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  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2020-May 17, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Tahoua, 6,955 households were registered between May and October 2020. They originated from Tahoua, Tillia and other departments in the Tahoua region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: March 07, 2020-October 06, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Maradi, 2'169 households were registered between April and September 2020. They originated from 9 communes in Guidan Roumji, Madarounfa and other departments in the Maradi region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: March 07, 2020-October 06, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Tillaberi, 4,859 households were registered between May and October 2020. They originated from 16 communes in Abala, Ayerou, Balleyara, Bankilare, Gotheye, Ouallam, Tera, Tillaberi and Torodi departments in the Tillaberi region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: August 17, 2016-September 06, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    Located in rural northern Uganda, Rhino Camp is home to more than 80,000 refugees3 – mostly South Sudanese who fled since July 2016. Other Rhino Camp residents come from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sudan, as well as the host Ugandan community. 74% of all heads of household are women,4 and Rhino Camp is one of a growing number of refugee settlements across nine UNHCR operations where solar street lamps are in use. Between April and June 2015 UNHCR installed some three dozen community lights in 50% of Rhino Camp’s 14 villages. As demand for community lighting far exceeded available funds, UNHCR worked with the refugee community and its partner the Danish Refugee Council to prioritize the strategic placement of lights within villages. The partners jointly selected locations where (1) refugees were prone to nighttime violence, theft or other safety risks, and (2) lights would promote constructive night-time activity. Using a 72-question survey, researchers asked respondents what day- and night-time6 activities they and their children do, and whether they do these activities in lit or unlit locations. Researchers then asked respondents if they feared or had been victims of something bad while doing these activities. The phrase something bad is the English translation for the most commonly used expressions – in Nuer, Dinka, Bari, and Kiswahili – of being a victim of an aggressive act or encountering danger. Survey responses reveal that the bad experiences that respondents most commonly fear are sexual and physical violence, theft, verbal harassment, injury, and encounters with animals
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-March 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    The assistance dataset includes the assistance history of the households that have taken the 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) assessment. The dataset is extracted from Refugees Assistance Information System (RAIS) which is an online Inter-Agency web application used by Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (LCRP) partners in Lebanon for tracking and reporting assistance provided to persons of concern to UNHCR.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 28 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-June 17, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    This contains data on assessment and rehabilitation of war-damaged shelter by both shelter cluster partners (humanitarian) and development/durable solution actors in Iraq.
  • Updated 16 June 2021 | Dataset date: June 01, 2019-August 31, 2019
    This data is by request only
    Primary data will be collected by means of a household-level survey designed with the participation of the humanitarian clusters in Somalia. Cluster leads are asked to outline information gaps and the type of data required to inform their strategic plans. Key indicators are developed by REACH with the substantive input of participating partners, and subsequently validated by the clusters. REACH will draft the household survey tool through an iterative consultation process with cluster partners and OCHA and is aligned, as much as possible, with the Joint Inter-Sectoral Analysis Framework (JIAF) which will serve as a common and structured method for assessing the severity of needs across different clusters. The assessment will use stratified cluster sampling at the district level using settlements as the clusters and households as the unit of measurement. For some districts, 2-stage stratified random sampling will be used instead of stratified cluster sampling for large urban centres, if it proves to be more efficient and logistically feasible for data collection. The sample will be stratified by population group, disaggregated by non-displaced communities, and IDP settlements; the sample will be further stratified by district to ensure coverage and comparison across the entire country (with the exception of inaccessible areas). In the case of cluster sampling, the minimum cluster size will be set to 6 households. The sample size will be adjusted for the design effect and will enable generalisation of the results to each of the two population strata in each district, with a 90% confidence level and a 10% margin of error.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: July 29, 2021-August 11, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. Four PDMs on Non-Food Items (NFI) have been conducted since 2018. One in March 2018 covering the period from the beginning of the refugee influx in August/September 2017, and the second one in August 2018 covering distributions made during the monsoon season that year. A third PDM exercise covered the period from September 2018 up to March 2019. And a fourth one in November 2019 covered the period from April to November 2019. The current PDM survey and recommendations cover the period from November 2019 up to July 2020. This PDM exercise was initially planned in April 2020, however, it was delayed due to the lockdown imposed at the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 1,166 households that had received NFIs from UNHCR took part in this PDM exercise. The findings from this report will be used in improving further upcoming distributions in 2020 and take into consideration lessons learned from COVID-19's impact on the distribution process. This fifth PDM survey and exercise covers the distribution of six types of NFI assistance provided through UNHCR and its partners in 2020. It includes Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)5, Core Relief Item kits (CRI)6, WASH Hygiene kits7, Compressed Rice Husks (CRH)8 and shelter repair and replacement assistance9
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 22 April 2021 | Dataset date: December 08, 2020-February 15, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Shelter Cluster 4W report (Who does What, Where, and When) for typhoon Goni (Rolly) and Vamco (Ulysses) in the Philippines
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 12 April 2021 | Dataset date: April 11, 2021-September 18, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Kutupalong Rohingya Refugee Camp, Bangladesh. The structure footprint covers the camps directly affected by the fire of the 22nd March 2021 (Camp 8E, Camp 8W and Camp 9). The footprint is based on high resolution drone imagery from March 2020 (IOM) and has been processed by REACH/UNOSAT. The footprint includes all digitised structures and so includes bridges, shelters and smaller structures, such as latrines etc. This footprint is an early release of the full structure/shelter footprint for all camps and has not been QCed. Users should use accordingly. The full, QCed, post-processed structure/shelter footprint for all camps will be released in mid-April.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 23 February 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-February 02, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Who is doing What in Azerbaijan: Response activities of Azerbaijan civil society organizations in support of internally displaced persons and other populations affected by the armed conflict of 2020.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 02, 2018-July 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    An estimated 723,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the newly-arrived refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources during the journey. The monsoon season began in May and continues into September, threatening the vast majority of refugees living in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the priority needs of the refugees, a Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), comissioned by UNHCR and with technical support from REACH, was conducted at the household level in 31 refugee sites (3,171 households were surveyed). Translators Without Borders supported in questionnaire translation and enumerator training. This survey identified a number of areas where the basic needs of Rohingya refugees are being met. At the same time, this assessment has identified continuing service gaps in the Rohingya response. For example, the majority of households do not believe there is enough light at night to safely access latrines, and WASH facilities are generally perceived as dangerous areas for girls under age 18. In terms of access to protection services, only a small number of households report members making use of children and women friendly spaces. Despite widespread distribution coverage of key non-food items such as kitchen sets, demand for these items remains high, and refugees are spending the greatest portion of their limited financial resources on basic items including food, clothing and fuel. Findings suggest that there are uncertainties around actions to prepare for cyclones. The mahjis remain almost the sole focal point for communication and complaints with refugees, reflecting their continued prominent position within refugee communities. Finally, the median household debt is twice the median household income for the 30 days prior to data collection, with only two-fifths of households reporting any source of income at all.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 08, 2019-January 26, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    An estimated 738,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources on the journey. The cyclone and monsoon seasons, stretching from May to October, further threatened the living conditions of the vast majority of refugees living who are in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the evolving priority needs of the refugees, and to understand change over time, this Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), coordinated by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and with technical support from REACH, was conducted in 33 refugee sites using a household survey methodology (3,165 households were surveyed). It is a follow up assessment to MSNA I in July 2018. Results of this MSNA are generalizable to the camp level with 95% confidence level and 10% margin of error. Support for questionnaire translation and enumerator language training was provided by Translators Without Borders.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2019-June 24, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee populations to support humanitarian planning and enhance operational and strategic decision-making. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the mid-term review of the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP), with the specific objective of enabling the tracking of JRP 2019 indicators for monitoring and review purposes. A total of 876 households were surveyed across 33 refugee sites. This J-MSNA was funded by UNHCR and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) and comprised of: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 05, 2019-September 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Ensuring adequate and safe shelter for the refugees has been the core part of UNHCR's response in the Rohingya Refugee Crisis Operation from the beginning of influx. Moving forward from emergency shelter kits (ESK) distribution to upgrade shelter kits (USK) distribution, in 2019 UNHCR has initiated a need based targeted shelter repair and replacement assistance to maintain adequate shelter conditions. In line with this approach, condition of the shelters have been assessed in order to identify the individual shelter needs and specific needs of vulnerable families by the technical staff of shelter partners according to criteria and information have been collected through GIS tool. A total of 59,920 shelters were assessed. Based on the outcome of the assessment, most vulnerable shelters have been provided shelter support for Repair and Replacement and less vulnerable shelters are also receiving support for repair and replacement.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: October 02, 2018-November 18, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    From 2 October to 18 November 2018, UNHCR carried out a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sweep assessment on water points, latrines and bathing facilities in 14 refugee camps. These include Kutupalong and Nayapara registered camps, and the Transit Centre. The assessment cover basic information on location, status, quality, the privacy of facilities and issues such as the management of menstrual hygiene and facilities for persons with specific needs. The dataset contains 3 modules: bathing (12,259 obervations), latrine (11,490 observations) and water points (6,767 observations).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 21, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 24, 2019-December 19, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR (Cox’s Bazar Field Office) conducted the second round of its WASH Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey from 24th November to 19th December 2019 in UNHCR’s area of operation in Kutupalong and Teknaf. Five WASH partners implemented the survey: NGO Forum, BRAC, OXFAM, Solidarité International and ACF. Preparation began in early November, as UNHCR discussed methodologies with participating agencies. Several meetings focussed on issues such as; staffing for the data collection and financial issues such as ‘per diem’ allowances. Several partner enumerators and their team leaders had no previous experience in KAP surveys, therefore, training modules were developed and implemented by UNHCR WASH staff. The objective of the survey was to better plan and guide future UNHCR WASH interventions implemented through NGO partners.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 25, 2019-December 04, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Maratane Refugee Camp is found in Northern Mozambique, Nampula Province, and is located around 35 kms from the capital city Nampula. The camp was established in February 2001, and since 2003, it has become the only reception center and official settlement in Mozambique, where asylum seekers and refugees can be registered and assisted. Currently, Maratane Refugee camp hosts approximately 9,242 refugees, which are mainly from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia and other nationalities. Maratane Camp is the only refugee camp in the country and is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). INAR is UNHCR's main government counterpart, and operates under the jurisdiction of the Ministry for Internal Affairs. INAR is divided into several units, including Protection/RSD, program, Registration and Logistics and is also UNHCR WASH partner for providing WASH service in the camp. In order to understand the current status and level of WASH service in the camp, UNHCR had conducted a WASH KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices) survey through coordination with INAR. Accordingly, a total of 433 households from different zones of the camp were interviewed using UNHCR's standard WASH KAP survey questionnaire which was pre-tested and adapted to local context.
  • 70+ Downloads
    Updated 14 December 2020 | Dataset date: December 08, 2020-December 08, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Shelter Cluster 4W report (Who does What, Where, and When) for typhoon Goni (Rolly) and Vamco (Ulysses) in the Philippines