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  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 29, 2018-September 06, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 25 August 2017, human rights violations and targeted violence against the Rohingya community in Rakhine State, Myanmar, have forced over 728,0002 of them to seek sanctuary in Bangladesh. Half of the refugees (55%) are children. Within two months of the first arrivals, the number of refugee population in Cox’s Bazar district quadrupled, which made it the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world. The refugees continued to arrive by foot and boat in subsequent months. Most of them came with few belongings or cash. UNHCR was among the first humanitarian organisations to respond to the refugee influx with life-saving assistance. Packages of blankets, plastic sheets, sleeping mats, family tents, plastic rolls, kitchen sets, jerry cans and buckets were distributed initially to 250,000 refugees within weeks after their arrival. By end of August 2018, UNHCR distributed 93,803 Core Relief Item (CRI) packages to newly arrived refugee families, each containing tarpaulins, kitchen set, blanket, jerry can, bucket, sleeping mat and solar lamp. At the same time, 90,524 families received Upgrade Shelter Kit (USK) consisting of mulli and borak bamboos, rope, plastic tarpaulins, sandbags and toolkits, to reinforce their shelters for the monsoon season. UNHCR, in close collaboration with partner agencies and other humanitarian actors, continues to support the Government of Bangladesh in responding to the refugee crisis by ensuring relief items are prepositioned and delivered to the most vulnerable refugees and host communities in a timely manner. UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugee’s feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilisation and effectiveness of assistance received. It is conducted after the distribution of relief items is completed. A total of 2,298 households were interviewed in this PDM. The PDM survey confirmed that non-food packages distributed by UNHCR and partners met the household needs and minimum quality standard as agreed by the Shelter/NFI Sector in Cox’s Bazar. The overall satisfaction score has improved from the previous survey in March. The refugees reported high satisfaction for the items received, and rated above 4.1 on a 5-point Likert scale for the items quality and usefulness. They also reported general satisfaction with the organisation of NFI distribution, with an average score of 4.0 on the Likert scale. The finding shows that UNHCR and partners are fulfilling their commitment to provide relief items that meet the specific needs of refugees, and that they were distributed in a timely and efficient manner.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2018-July 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The closure of the so-called "Balkan route" and the EU-Turkey Statement in March 2016 changed Greece from a transit country to a country hosting a growing population of refugees and asylum seekers. To address the needs of this growing population staying on the Greek mainland, the Greek Government established Open Reception Facilities (ORFs) in Northern and Central Greece. In the beginning of 2016, UNHCR through its partners established urban accommodation schemes to host asylum seekers eligible for relocation as part of the European solidarity measures. The program evolved to focus on the most vulnerable asylum seekers for whom accommodation in the ORFs was unsuitable. The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) set up a similar accommodation program in late 2016 also focusing on the most vulnerable. Arrivals at the Greek-Turkish land border increased in late 2017 and as a result a higher number of people started arriving directly to Thessaloniki, without having presented themselves to the authorities at the border. Hence, they were not registered by the Greek authorities and as a consequence lacked access to a dignified shelter, or other forms of basic assistance available to asylum seekers and refugees. The Municipality of Thessaloniki and the humanitarian community jointly decided to conduct a profiling exercise of the refugees and asylum seekers hosted in Thessaloniki as well as Third Country Nationals not registered with the Asylum Service in Thessaloniki. The objective was to explore the extent to which refugees and asylum seekers were moving towards local integration. This was done by looking at their outlook for the future as well as the obstacles and possibilities towards greater economic and socio-cultural integration in Greece. The analysis of persons with no asylum service documentation focused on the key challenges faced by those groups, such as lack of a regularized status and homelessness. The collected data would form a baseline for future integration monitoring and would additionally be a useful tool for the implementation of integration activities as foreseen in national and local strategies for integration. The survey included a total of 861 households. The survey found out that the great majority of refugees and asylum seekers in the accommodation scheme and in the ORF had been in Thessaloniki less than one year. The majority of the households in the accommodation scheme (60%) reported that they intended to stay in Thessaloniki in the long term, and one of the main conditions for being able to integrate locally is finding employment. Amongst the households in the ORF, less than half intended to stay in Thessaloniki (45%) and more than a third (38%) intended to move to another EU country. For those intending to stay, being able to integrate locally was very much linked to finding a different accommodation solution. The households having found their own accommodation were on average living longer in Thessaloniki, as almost half of them had lived in the city for more than one year compared to other groups who have been living in their majority in their accommodation for less than one year. This group of refugees and asylum seekers also included the biggest group reporting that they intended to stay in Thessaloniki longer term (76%). For them the main condition for local integration was access to employment and getting the status of international protection. Accessing employment as a key condition for local integration was also highlighted and confirmed during community consultations with asylum seekers and refugees.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2019) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to provide a multi-sectoral update of the situation and to identify changes and trends. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). Survey teams visited 4,727 randomly selected Syrian refugee households, covering all districts across Lebanon. The result of the study demonstrates that while some improvements in specific indicators are noted, Syrian refugees in Lebanon continue to show heightened vulnerabilities. While rates of birth registration have seen an increase since previous years, other legal documentation issues (e.g. legal residency) remains to be an on-going challenge. About half of households are living in extreme poverty, despite large scale assistance programs to families. Additionally, while rent prices were not noted to increase dramatically, many families continue to live in substandard and over-crowded conditions across the country.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2016-December 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    A collaborative profiling exercise was conducted with the aim to provide a comprehensive analysis of the displacement situation in urban and peri-urban areas across 9 Governorates in South and Central Iraq. The study was a collaborative effort of a Technical Working Group consisting of staff from MoDM’s Department of Information and Research, UNHCR staff, and with the support of the Joint IDP Profiling Service (JIPS) and Statistics Norway. The methodology and tools were developed with the Steering Committee and the data was collected in 2016. 4094 households were included in the survey. The analysis of the data never resulted in a published report.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Arsaal, was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). VASyR Arsaal is an addition to the 2019 VASyR, containing a representative sample of Syrian Refugee households in Arsaal.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 09, 2017-May 24, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    The 2017 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses the situation of a representative sample of registered Syrian refugee households to identify situational changes and trends. With over one million registered refugees within its borders, Lebanon hosts the second-largest population of Syrian refugees in the region, and the highest per capita population of refugees in the world. Since the first assessment, the VASyR has been an essential tool for partnership and for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. A total of 4966 households were interviewed. The contents of this report, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrate that economic vulnerability has worsened, with more than half of refugees living in extreme poverty, and that food insecurity rates are stable, but remain high.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 23, 2016-June 04, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    The 2016 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) surveyed a representative sample of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their situation. The assessment to provided valuable insight into refugees living conditions, from the size of their families to the shelter they live in, to their economic vulnerability and food insecurity. Throughout this report, refugees own viewpoints offer a crucial glimpse into the strategies they deploy to survive and their own perceptions of their situation and the assistance they receive. A total of 4596 households were surveyed. Since its inception, the VASyR has been an essential process and partnership for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. As in previous years, humanitarian agencies have incorporated VASyR findings into their programming and recommendations. The assessment, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrates that economic vulnerability is, at best, as serious as previous year. Over one third of refugees are moderately to severely food insecure, an increase compared to 2015. Families have exhausted their limited resources, and are having to adapt to survive on the bare minimum. Refugees continue to rely on harmful coping mechanisms to get by.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2018-July 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Government of Sudan and the international community are working together to jointly support durable solutions for Darfurs internally displaced people. The commitment is rooted in the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) from 2011, signed by the Government of Sudan, other major parties to the conflict and the international community, and which sets out the framework for peace in Darfur. The peace agreement and the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS) that followed constitute political commitments to support durable peace and development in Darfur. This pledge has resulted in piloting a durable solutions process in El Fasher in North Darfur. To reach durable solutions and end displacement, long-term planning based on agreed and jointly-owned comprehensive data is needed. To establish an agreed evidence base, a collaborative profiling approach was adopted that brought actors together to ensure trust and ownership of the results of the profiling exercise. An important aspect of this durable solutions profiling is that it places IDPs centre-stage alongside the two other major stakeholdersthe Government of Sudan and the international communitypermitting the profiling results and recommendations to be owned and signed off by all parties. The durable solutions profiling exercise in El Fasher makes up step two: getting better informed about the displacement affected communities in the five-stage durable solutions process. The survey included 3002 households. It specifically aims to: provide a comprehensive profile of IDPs residing in Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps; develop a better understanding of IDPs vulnerabilities, coping mechanisms, capacities and provide insight into IDPs perceptions and their future settlement intentions; provide a jointly agreed upon data set to help inform durable solutions programming responses; pilot a profiling exercise of displacement and joint durable solutions planning that could be replicated in other Sudan contexts with displaced populations.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 22, 2018-January 17, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 470,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites, and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey was designed to address these shortcomings and support the settlement's development framework, as well as the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data were collected in November 2018 to January 2019, covering about 6004 households.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: September 17, 2019-October 20, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR standardized expanded nutrition surveys (SENS) were conducted in the three refugee camps located in Kigoma region, the western part of Tanzania. The region has been receiving waves of refugees usually fleeing their countries particularly Burundi and the Republic Democratic of Congo (DRC) for decades now. During the surveys, Kigoma region was mainly hosting 260,906 refugees including; 58,077 Congolese in Nyarugusu old camp, 84,028 Burundians in Nyarugusu new camp, 84,691 Burundians in Nduta and 34,110 Burundians in Mtendeli camp. The under-five population was 54,395 in total including; 11,118 in Nyarugusu old camp, 16,861 in Nyarugusu new camp, 18,649 in Nduta and 7,767 in Mtendeli. Camps are located closer to host communities and to some extent the ethnical characteristics resembles especially between Burundians and the ethnic group of “Waha”, the majority in Kasulu and Kibondo districts. Unlike in previous years, the upgraded UNHCR SENS from version 2 (2013) to version 3 (2019) was piloted for the first time in Kigoma region, Tanzania between September and October 2019. In this version, seven modules were considered namely; Demography, Anthropometry and Health, Anaemia, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF), Food Security, Mosquito Net Coverage and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 16, 2020-May 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The present PDM was conducted under time and resource constraints related to COVID-19 emergency. Due to the restrictions on public gathering and partial restrictions on movements, the survey findings could not have been triangulated with the FGDs or market assessment, which will be an integral part of all subsequent PDMs. The PDM household survey data collection took place over three days on 25 - 27 March 2020. ProGres V4 data of Kalobeyei persons of concern was used as a sampling frame, with a sample drawn using stratified random sampling based on random numbers generation. The original sample included over 400 households (adjusted for a non-response rate) aiming at a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of 5. However, the enumerators managed to conduct 457 interviews with respondents added through convenience sampling. Due to poor quality of some of the records, however, only 388 data entries were validated. This nevertheless allows us to remain within the same degree of precision in the inference, although affected by a bias linked to a non-probability sampling.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 21, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 13, 2018-February 20, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This study is the result of the socio-demographic and labor analysis of refugee residents in Brazil and represents a milestone in the production of knowledge about the integration of this population into the country. The study shows that most of the interviewees maintain close ties with family, friends and entities located in the countries of origin and, at the same time, demonstrate great knowledge of the Brazilian culture and want to become Brazilian citizens. Nevertheless, they pointed out obstacles to integration, including discriminatory acts. Several factors explain the vulnerability of the refugee population in Brazil: labor market, low wages or insufficient income, difficulty in recognizing diplomas and accessing public or banking services. All these factors, common to a large part of the Brazilian population, have a more striking impact on the quality of life of the refugee population.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 24, 2019-December 19, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR (Cox’s Bazar Field Office) conducted the second round of its WASH Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey from 24th November to 19th December 2019 in UNHCR’s area of operation in Kutupalong and Teknaf. Five WASH partners implemented the survey: NGO Forum, BRAC, OXFAM, Solidarité International and ACF. Preparation began in early November, as UNHCR discussed methodologies with participating agencies. Several meetings focussed on issues such as; staffing for the data collection and financial issues such as ‘per diem’ allowances. Several partner enumerators and their team leaders had no previous experience in KAP surveys, therefore, training modules were developed and implemented by UNHCR WASH staff. The objective of the survey was to better plan and guide future UNHCR WASH interventions implemented through NGO partners.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2017-November 10, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in November 2017 to determine the current Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitude and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 559 HHs (379 in Ajuong Thok and 180 in Pamir) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of ten (10) days. Data was cleaned and analysed in Excel. The findings showed that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 19.5 liters in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly lower than the recommended Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. The average HH size was six people. Refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP) and other health partners. It is recommended that proper water use measures be put in place to reduce water waste and that sanitation and hygiene messaging continue to be provided to improve sanitation and hygiene, with access to, and use of, latrines by refugees.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2018-November 11, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in November 2018 to determine the current Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitudes and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 1,040 HHs (520 HHs in each location) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of 10 days. Data was cleaned and analyzed in Excel. The summary of the results is presented in this report. The findings showed that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 21, in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly higher than the recommended Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. This is a slight improvement from the 19.5 liters reported the previous year. The average HH size was six people. Women comprised 83.2% of the surveyed respondents and males 16.8%. Almost all the respondents were refugees, constituting 99.6%. The refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP), Africa Humanitarian Action (AHA) and International Rescue Committee (IRC). Most refugees had knowledge about keeping water containers clean, washing hands during critical times, safe excreta disposal and disease prevention.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 04, 2018-June 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report presents the findings of the profiling activities conducted from June to August 2018 in communities hosting internally displaced persons (IDPs) of the Marawi conflict and return communities in the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon. Data was collected through structured interviews with IDP households using the kobo™ tool. Primary respondents were heads of households and in their absence, any person of legal age in the family. A total of 34,785 heads of households were interviewed in the profiling activity, representing 97,126 IDPs in 56 municipalities and 3 cities. This report presents data on demographic makeup of the IDPs such as age, sex, number of households, and family size, as well as protection information relating to displacement location, place of origin, resettlement, integration; various vulnerabilities of persons with special needs; educational attainment; income livelihood and skills; access to assistance; access to information; civil documentation; property ownership; intent to return; access to information, assistance received, and sources of assistance. Special focus is given on children and women in separate sections of this report. A significant number of IDPs continue to experience gaps in assistance related to health, education, shelter and long-term livelihood support. Also, IDPs continue to experience protection risks due to lack of civil documentation due to loss or destruction of birth certificates. A more nuanced and targeted approach that will address specific protection needs of IDPs is needed.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2019-November 21, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in October 2019 to determine the current Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitudes and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 1,474 HHs (735 HHs in Ajuong Thok and 739 HHs in Pamir) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of 21 days. Data was cleaned and analyzed in Excel. The summary of the results is presented in this report. The findings show that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 23.4, in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly higher than the recommended United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. This is a slight improvement from the 21 liters reported the previous year. The average HH size was six people. Women comprised 83% of the surveyed respondents and males 17%. Almost all the respondents were refugees, constituting 99.5% (n=1,466). The refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP) and other health partners. Most refugees had knowledge about keeping the water containers clean, washing hands during critical times, safe excreta disposal and disease prevention.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 22, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 08, 2020-July 09, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This sampling survey was designed to rapidly measure the protection and socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on the refugee population in Mbera camp the region of Hodh Echargui in Mauritania. The result shows that the socio-economic situation of all households across all vulnerability categories has degraded due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The top four fears of refugees are related to food shortages, price increases, disruption of basic service facilities and travel restrictions.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 25, 2019-December 04, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Maratane Refugee Camp is found in Northern Mozambique, Nampula Province, and is located around 35 kms from the capital city Nampula. The camp was established in February 2001, and since 2003, it has become the only reception center and official settlement in Mozambique, where asylum seekers and refugees can be registered and assisted. Currently, Maratane Refugee camp hosts approximately 9,242 refugees, which are mainly from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia and other nationalities. Maratane Camp is the only refugee camp in the country and is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). INAR is UNHCR's main government counterpart, and operates under the jurisdiction of the Ministry for Internal Affairs. INAR is divided into several units, including Protection/RSD, program, Registration and Logistics and is also UNHCR WASH partner for providing WASH service in the camp. In order to understand the current status and level of WASH service in the camp, UNHCR had conducted a WASH KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices) survey through coordination with INAR. Accordingly, a total of 433 households from different zones of the camp were interviewed using UNHCR's standard WASH KAP survey questionnaire which was pre-tested and adapted to local context.