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  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 08, 2021-March 31, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. For this assessment of non-food items, 2517 individuals recepients of soap kits were interviewed, and were asked questions about quality, sufficiency of quantity and usefulness of such kits. The survey also includes questions on other preferred items and use of negative coping mechanisms for livelihoods.
  • 4300+ Downloads
    Updated 29 June 2021 | Dataset date: September 02, 2020-August 02, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The Syrian IDP camps monitoring interactive study is issued by the IMU of the ACU on a monthly basis, to monitor the humanitarian situation of 231 IDp camps in Idleb and Aleppo governorates in Syria’s northwest, shedding light on the needs of the IDPs and the services provided in the camps in the following sectors: Population statistics, WASH, Health, Education, FSL, Shelter and NFI, in addition to the priority needs of IDPs. The study also includes statistics of those who arrive at and leave the camps and the important incidents which took place during the month of the data collection.
  • 3000+ Downloads
    Updated 24 June 2021 | Dataset date: December 12, 2016-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    This data has been produced by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) on behalf of the Humanitarian Country Team and partners. The data provides the Humanitarian Country Team’s shared understanding of the crisis, including the most pressing humanitarian need and the estimated number of people who need assistance. It represents a consolidated evidence base and helps inform joint strategic response planning.
  • Updated 16 June 2021 | Dataset date: June 01, 2019-August 31, 2019
    This data is by request only
    Primary data will be collected by means of a household-level survey designed with the participation of the humanitarian clusters in Somalia. Cluster leads are asked to outline information gaps and the type of data required to inform their strategic plans. Key indicators are developed by REACH with the substantive input of participating partners, and subsequently validated by the clusters. REACH will draft the household survey tool through an iterative consultation process with cluster partners and OCHA and is aligned, as much as possible, with the Joint Inter-Sectoral Analysis Framework (JIAF) which will serve as a common and structured method for assessing the severity of needs across different clusters. The assessment will use stratified cluster sampling at the district level using settlements as the clusters and households as the unit of measurement. For some districts, 2-stage stratified random sampling will be used instead of stratified cluster sampling for large urban centres, if it proves to be more efficient and logistically feasible for data collection. The sample will be stratified by population group, disaggregated by non-displaced communities, and IDP settlements; the sample will be further stratified by district to ensure coverage and comparison across the entire country (with the exception of inaccessible areas). In the case of cluster sampling, the minimum cluster size will be set to 6 households. The sample size will be adjusted for the design effect and will enable generalisation of the results to each of the two population strata in each district, with a 90% confidence level and a 10% margin of error.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 10 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 30, 2021-August 02, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Humanitarian needs overview for Zimbabwe
  • Updated 27 May 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2018-May 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2018) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its sixth year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million Syrian refugees who have fled their country’s conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2018). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains the largest concentration of refugees per capita and the fourth largest refugee population in the world. VASyR includes a sample of 4,446 Syrian refugee households from 26 districts across Lebanon. The assessment demonstrates that despite the large scale assistance and the efforts of Lebanon and its partners that have resulted in improvements in economic vulnerability and stabilization in education, food security and some improvements in the situation for women, girls and female-headed households, Syrian refugees still remain very vulnerable. The economic context remains precarious and the protection needs to persist.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 27 May 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2019-March 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Multiple causes for displacement, all too often underpinned by violence and persecution, has led to over 800,000 Central Americans fleeing their homes, beginning in 2013. Year after year, there has been an increase in individuals fleeing. This was marked initially by especially large numbers of unaccompanied children, then joined in around 2018 with dramatic increases in families units fleeing Central America. Families are forced to flee together as violent threats and persecution by criminal groups in communities extend beyond individuals to entire family units. Given these shifting dynamics in human mobility in these countries, UNHCR and UNICEF, through the Interdisciplinary Development Consultants, CID Gallup, decided to undertake this study with the aim of understanding and giving visibility to the forced displacement of families that flee northern Central America. In addition, the study also seeks to shed light on the current trends, protection risks and factors associated to the forced displacement and migration of unaccompanied and separated children. For this purpose, Gallup conducted 3,104 surveys, complemented by focus group sessions segmented according to the geography of displacement in the region: country of origin, of transit and of asylum. Additionally, interviews were undertaken with families who were part of large mixed movement "caravans" that left Honduras at the beginning of 2020.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: March 16, 2020-May 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The present PDM was conducted under time and resource constraints related to COVID-19 emergency. Due to the restrictions on public gathering and partial restrictions on movements, the survey findings could not have been triangulated with the FGDs or market assessment, which will be an integral part of all subsequent PDMs. The PDM household survey data collection took place over three days on 25 - 27 March 2020. ProGres V4 data of Kalobeyei persons of concern was used as a sampling frame, with a sample drawn using stratified random sampling based on random numbers generation. The original sample included over 400 households (adjusted for a non-response rate) aiming at a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of 5. However, the enumerators managed to conduct 457 interviews with respondents added through convenience sampling. Due to poor quality of some of the records, however, only 388 data entries were validated. This nevertheless allows us to remain within the same degree of precision in the inference, although affected by a bias linked to a non-probability sampling.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: April 22, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    It is increasingly recognised that the majority of the world's refugees reside not in camps, but dispersed amongst the community in the countries where they have sought asylum. This is the case for Syrian refugees in Jordan, of which 84% live outside official refugee camps in urban and rural areas across the country. Understanding the needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of this dispersed refugee population is vital to ensuring their protection and access to services. The purpose of this dataset is to examine the situation of Syrian refugees living outside camps in Jordan, based on data collected through UNHCR's Home Visits programme. Under this programme, interviews are conducted with every refugee household registering with UNHCR outside camps. This provides an unparalleled source of information about the situation of Syrian refugees in non-camp settings.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    It is increasingly recognised that the majority of the world's refugees reside not in camps, but dispersed amongst the community in the countries where they have sought asylum. This is the case for Syrian refugees in Jordan, of which 84% live outside official refugee camps in urban and rural areas across the country. Understanding the needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of this dispersed refugee population is vital to ensuring their protection and access to services. The purpose of this dataset is to examine the situation of Syrian refugees living outside camps in Jordan, based on data collected through UNHCR's Home Visits programme. Under this programme, interviews are conducted with every refugee household registering with UNHCR outside camps. This provides an unparalleled source of information about the situation of Syrian refugees in non-camp settings.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2018-December 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    It is increasingly recognised that the majority of the world's refugees reside not in camps, but dispersed amongst the community in the countries where they have sought asylum. This is the case for Syrian refugees in Jordan, of which 84% live outside official refugee camps in urban and rural areas across the country. Understanding the needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of this dispersed refugee population is vital to ensuring their protection and access to services. The purpose of this dataset is to examine the situation of Syrian refugees living outside camps in Jordan, based on data collected through UNHCR's Home Visits programme. Under this programme, interviews are conducted with every refugee household registering with UNHCR outside camps. This provides an unparalleled source of information about the situation of Syrian refugees in non-camp settings.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    It is increasingly recognised that the majority of the world's refugees reside not in camps, but dispersed amongst the community in the countries where they have sought asylum. This is the case for Syrian refugees in Jordan, of which 84% live outside official refugee camps in urban and rural areas across the country. Understanding the needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of this dispersed refugee population is vital to ensuring their protection and access to services. The purpose of this dataset is to examine the situation of Syrian refugees living outside camps in Jordan, based on data collected through UNHCR's Home Visits programme. Under this programme, interviews are conducted with every refugee household registering with UNHCR outside camps. This provides an unparalleled source of information about the situation of Syrian refugees in non-camp settings.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    It is increasingly recognised that the majority of the world's refugees reside not in camps, but dispersed amongst the community in the countries where they have sought asylum. This is the case for Syrian refugees in Jordan, of which 84% live outside official refugee camps in urban and rural areas across the country. Understanding the needs, vulnerabilities and capacities of this dispersed refugee population is vital to ensuring their protection and access to services. The purpose of this dataset is to examine the situation of Syrian refugees living outside camps in Jordan, based on data collected through UNHCR's Home Visits programme. Under this programme, interviews are conducted with every refugee household registering with UNHCR outside camps. This provides an unparalleled source of information about the situation of Syrian refugees in non-camp settings.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: July 29, 2021-August 11, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. Four PDMs on Non-Food Items (NFI) have been conducted since 2018. One in March 2018 covering the period from the beginning of the refugee influx in August/September 2017, and the second one in August 2018 covering distributions made during the monsoon season that year. A third PDM exercise covered the period from September 2018 up to March 2019. And a fourth one in November 2019 covered the period from April to November 2019. The current PDM survey and recommendations cover the period from November 2019 up to July 2020. This PDM exercise was initially planned in April 2020, however, it was delayed due to the lockdown imposed at the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 1,166 households that had received NFIs from UNHCR took part in this PDM exercise. The findings from this report will be used in improving further upcoming distributions in 2020 and take into consideration lessons learned from COVID-19's impact on the distribution process. This fifth PDM survey and exercise covers the distribution of six types of NFI assistance provided through UNHCR and its partners in 2020. It includes Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)5, Core Relief Item kits (CRI)6, WASH Hygiene kits7, Compressed Rice Husks (CRH)8 and shelter repair and replacement assistance9
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: July 15, 2020-September 29, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Assessment of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on food security, livelihoods and local markets for refugees in urban areas.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: October 26, 2020-November 16, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    These data were produced from a household survey that was part of the post-distribtion monitoring exercise for a cash-based intervention (CBI) in Dzaleka Refugee Camp, Dowa district of Malawi. The CBI was intended to provide consumption support to extremely poor households who graduated from the livelihoods programme. A cohort graduates from the programme after 18 months of active participation. Participants are selected from extremely poor households who live below the poverty line and often times engaged in negative coping mechanisms to meet their basic needs. The consumption support is meant as a cushion for their basic needs as they continue participating in various livelihoods activities. Consumption support has a time frame of 12 months for each participating cohort. The target groups involve persons of concern (POCs) and host communities. After 12 months, it is assumed that participants have started generating enough income to cushion for their basic needs including further investments through diversification into additional livelihoods activities. Out of the 449 households that received the CBI, 264 were randomly sampled for this post-distrubtion monitoring exercise. The total population in Dzaleka camp is 48,557.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: October 21, 2019-December 18, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 500,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites (about 40% of the total refugees in Kenya), and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey replicates the preceding Kalobeyei SES (2018), designed to address these shortcomings and support the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data was collected in October 2019 to December 2019, covering about 2,122 households.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • 700+ Downloads
    Updated 20 April 2021 | Dataset date: May 31, 2016-June 21, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    Information Package for Fiji Evacuation Tracking & Monitoring Cycle 2
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 15 April 2021 | Dataset date: July 14, 2020-September 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The eighth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between July 14 and September 23, 2020, a total of 9,634 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 61 districts in Iraq (including 40 formal camps).
  • 1000+ Downloads
    Updated 7 April 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-January 11, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    A village assessment survey (VAS) is a sub-component of mobility tracking. It collects data on returning IDPs, IDPs, returned migrants and host community members. VAS evaluates the absorption capacity of villages to receive returning IDPs with a focus on accessibility of services, livelihoods and reintegration.
  • Updated 18 March 2021 | Dataset date: September 01, 2019-September 01, 2019
    This data is by request only
    MCNA conducted at household level nationwide in Iraq. The MCNA covered all conflict-affected populations: in-camp IDP, out-of-camp IDP, returnee and select host populations, in all accessible districts where target population were present. Sampled on district (ADM 2) level and data collected June - August 2019.
  • Updated 18 March 2021 | Dataset date: July 14, 2020-September 23, 2020
    This data is by request only
    The eighth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between July 14 and September 23, 2020, a total of 9,634 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 61 districts in Iraq (including 40 formal camps).