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  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 11 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: August 17, 2016-September 06, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    Located in rural northern Uganda, Rhino Camp is home to more than 80,000 refugees3 – mostly South Sudanese who fled since July 2016. Other Rhino Camp residents come from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sudan, as well as the host Ugandan community. 74% of all heads of household are women,4 and Rhino Camp is one of a growing number of refugee settlements across nine UNHCR operations where solar street lamps are in use. Between April and June 2015 UNHCR installed some three dozen community lights in 50% of Rhino Camp’s 14 villages. As demand for community lighting far exceeded available funds, UNHCR worked with the refugee community and its partner the Danish Refugee Council to prioritize the strategic placement of lights within villages. The partners jointly selected locations where (1) refugees were prone to nighttime violence, theft or other safety risks, and (2) lights would promote constructive night-time activity. Using a 72-question survey, researchers asked respondents what day- and night-time6 activities they and their children do, and whether they do these activities in lit or unlit locations. Researchers then asked respondents if they feared or had been victims of something bad while doing these activities. The phrase something bad is the English translation for the most commonly used expressions – in Nuer, Dinka, Bari, and Kiswahili – of being a victim of an aggressive act or encountering danger. Survey responses reveal that the bad experiences that respondents most commonly fear are sexual and physical violence, theft, verbal harassment, injury, and encounters with animals
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: July 29, 2021-August 11, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. Four PDMs on Non-Food Items (NFI) have been conducted since 2018. One in March 2018 covering the period from the beginning of the refugee influx in August/September 2017, and the second one in August 2018 covering distributions made during the monsoon season that year. A third PDM exercise covered the period from September 2018 up to March 2019. And a fourth one in November 2019 covered the period from April to November 2019. The current PDM survey and recommendations cover the period from November 2019 up to July 2020. This PDM exercise was initially planned in April 2020, however, it was delayed due to the lockdown imposed at the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 1,166 households that had received NFIs from UNHCR took part in this PDM exercise. The findings from this report will be used in improving further upcoming distributions in 2020 and take into consideration lessons learned from COVID-19's impact on the distribution process. This fifth PDM survey and exercise covers the distribution of six types of NFI assistance provided through UNHCR and its partners in 2020. It includes Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)5, Core Relief Item kits (CRI)6, WASH Hygiene kits7, Compressed Rice Husks (CRH)8 and shelter repair and replacement assistance9
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: October 21, 2019-December 18, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 500,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites (about 40% of the total refugees in Kenya), and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey replicates the preceding Kalobeyei SES (2018), designed to address these shortcomings and support the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data was collected in October 2019 to December 2019, covering about 2,122 households.
  • Updated 21 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2018-July 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Government of Sudan and the international community are working together to jointly support durable solutions for Darfurs internally displaced people. The commitment is rooted in the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) from 2011, signed by the Government of Sudan, other major parties to the conflict and the international community, and which sets out the framework for peace in Darfur. The peace agreement and the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS) that followed constitute political commitments to support durable peace and development in Darfur. This pledge has resulted in piloting a durable solutions process in El Fasher in North Darfur. To reach durable solutions and end displacement, long-term planning based on agreed and jointly-owned comprehensive data is needed. To establish an agreed evidence base, a collaborative profiling approach was adopted that brought actors together to ensure trust and ownership of the results of the profiling exercise. An important aspect of this durable solutions profiling is that it places IDPs centre-stage alongside the two other major stakeholdersthe Government of Sudan and the international communitypermitting the profiling results and recommendations to be owned and signed off by all parties. The durable solutions profiling exercise in El Fasher makes up step two: getting better informed about the displacement affected communities in the five-stage durable solutions process. The survey included 3002 households. It specifically aims to: provide a comprehensive profile of IDPs residing in Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps; develop a better understanding of IDPs vulnerabilities, coping mechanisms, capacities and provide insight into IDPs perceptions and their future settlement intentions; provide a jointly agreed upon data set to help inform durable solutions programming responses; pilot a profiling exercise of displacement and joint durable solutions planning that could be replicated in other Sudan contexts with displaced populations.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 22, 2018-January 17, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 470,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites, and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey was designed to address these shortcomings and support the settlement's development framework, as well as the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data were collected in November 2018 to January 2019, covering about 6004 households.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 22, 2016-August 27, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    The survey of the Pemba was an attempt to reach all households in Kenya with links to Pemba in Tanzania. It was conducted in the two counties of Kilifi and Kwale on the coast, north and south of Mombasa, respectively. According to information from village elders familiar with the Pemba community in Kenya, most of the Pemba population resides in these two counties. While there are some Pemba residents in Lamu, the security situation prevented data collection there. Further, a few Pemba are believed to live in the city of Mombasa and elsewhere in the country. But due to lack of further information, no data were collected in Mombasa or elsewhere. The objectives of the full survey, conducted in August 2016, were: 1. To establish the number and characteristics of the Pemba living in Kenya, including their arrival period in Kenya, nationality and their problems; 2. To make recommendations for the issuance of the documentation that is required for those who apply for citizenshiop by registration
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 04, 2018-June 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report presents the findings of the profiling activities conducted from June to August 2018 in communities hosting internally displaced persons (IDPs) of the Marawi conflict and return communities in the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon. Data was collected through structured interviews with IDP households using the kobo™ tool. Primary respondents were heads of households and in their absence, any person of legal age in the family. A total of 34,785 heads of households were interviewed in the profiling activity, representing 97,126 IDPs in 56 municipalities and 3 cities. This report presents data on demographic makeup of the IDPs such as age, sex, number of households, and family size, as well as protection information relating to displacement location, place of origin, resettlement, integration; various vulnerabilities of persons with special needs; educational attainment; income livelihood and skills; access to assistance; access to information; civil documentation; property ownership; intent to return; access to information, assistance received, and sources of assistance. Special focus is given on children and women in separate sections of this report. A significant number of IDPs continue to experience gaps in assistance related to health, education, shelter and long-term livelihood support. Also, IDPs continue to experience protection risks due to lack of civil documentation due to loss or destruction of birth certificates. A more nuanced and targeted approach that will address specific protection needs of IDPs is needed.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 25, 2019-December 04, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Maratane Refugee Camp is found in Northern Mozambique, Nampula Province, and is located around 35 kms from the capital city Nampula. The camp was established in February 2001, and since 2003, it has become the only reception center and official settlement in Mozambique, where asylum seekers and refugees can be registered and assisted. Currently, Maratane Refugee camp hosts approximately 9,242 refugees, which are mainly from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia and other nationalities. Maratane Camp is the only refugee camp in the country and is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). INAR is UNHCR's main government counterpart, and operates under the jurisdiction of the Ministry for Internal Affairs. INAR is divided into several units, including Protection/RSD, program, Registration and Logistics and is also UNHCR WASH partner for providing WASH service in the camp. In order to understand the current status and level of WASH service in the camp, UNHCR had conducted a WASH KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices) survey through coordination with INAR. Accordingly, a total of 433 households from different zones of the camp were interviewed using UNHCR's standard WASH KAP survey questionnaire which was pre-tested and adapted to local context.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 27, 2019-July 05, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    In 2016, UNHCR became aware of a group of stateless persons living in or near Nairobi, Kenya. Most of them were Shona, descendants of missionaries who arrived from Zimbabwe and Zambia in the 1960s and remained in Kenya. The total number of Shona living in Kenya is estimated to be between 3,000 and 3,500 people. On their first arrival, the Shona were issued certificates of registration, but a change in the Registration of Persons Act of 1978 did not make provision for people of non-Kenyan descent, consequently denying the Shona citizenship. Zimbabwe and Zambia did not consider them nationals either, rendering them stateless. Besides the Shona, there are other groups of stateless persons of different origins and ethnicities, with the total number of stateless persons in Kenya estimated at 18,500. UNHCR and the Government of Kenya are taking steps to address statelessness in the country, among them is the registration of selected groups for nationalization. In April 2019, the Government of Kenya pledged to recognize qualifying members of the Shona community as Kenyan citizens. However, the lack of detailed information on the stateless population in Kenya hinders advocacy for the regularization of their nationality status. Together with the Kenyan Government through the Department of Immigration Services (DIS) and the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS), UNHCR Kenya conducted registration and socioeconomic survey for the Shona community from May to July 2019. While the primary objective of the registration was to document migration, residence and family history with the aim of preparing their registration as citizens, this survey was conducted to provide a baseline on the socio-economic situation of the stateless Shona population for comparison with non-stateless populations of Kenya.
  • Updated 4 December 2020 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-January 01, 2019
    This data is by request only
    Percentage of household by wall and roof type 1993-2019 in Indonesia. Poor people are assumed to live in a house with a non-bamboo wall (brick and wood) and non-sugar palm fiber roof (concrete, tiles, wood, zinc, and asbestos). This data, derived from the National Socio-Economic Survey (SUSENAS) data published by BPS every six months (March and September). The data is available in MS. Excel (XLS) format, wall type: https://www.bps.go.id/statictable/2009/03/12/1545/persentase-rumah-tangga-yang-menempati-rumah-dengan-dinding-terluas-bukan-bambu-lainnya-1993-2017.html; roof type: https://www.bps.go.id/statictable/2009/03/12/1543/persentase-rumah-tangga-yang-menempati-rumah-dengan-atap-terluas-bukan-ijuk-lainnya-1993-2017.html
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 01, 2004-August 01, 2004
    This dataset updates: Never
    A series of spreadsheets with data by municipality from 1993 on the following sectors: Demographics Potable water services Education services Healthcare services * Services provided by housing unit The data is p-coded with the DIVIPOLA system.
  • Updated 14 October 2019 | Dataset date: May 01, 2016-October 31, 2016
    This data is by request only
    Iraq (South and Central) profiling of urban/out of camp IDPs and host populations with data collected between May and October 2016. The exercise covered 9 Governorates with a total sample of 4,094 households (2,126 IDP households and 1,970 local households).