UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency
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  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2021-September 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2021-September 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2021-September 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: June 07, 2021-July 07, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Ten years into the Syria conflict, Lebanon remains at the forefront of one of the worst humanitarian crises. The economic downturn, steep inflation, COVID-19 and finally the Beirut blast have pushed vulnerable communities in Lebanon - including Syrian refugees - to the brink, with thousands of families sinking further into poverty. The Government of Lebanon (GoL) estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.6 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011. The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains one of the largest concentration of refugees per capita in the world. The 2021 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) was the ninth annual survey assessing the situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their vulnerabilities. Considering the prolonged socio-economic status in Lebanon and COVID-19, it was crucial to provide needs-based estimates on Syrian refugees in the country. Since VASyR 2021 was one of the few assessments that were conducted face-to-face, the implementation was accompanied by a comprehensive protocol to ensure the safety of families and field workers. The criticality of conducting the VASyR 2021 was to provide insights about Syrian refugees impacted by the political and economic crisis that hit Lebanon in late 2019 and by the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: September 16, 2019-September 20, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Surveys (SENS) provide regular nutrition data that plays a key role in delivering effective and timely interventions to ensure good nutritional outcomes among populations affected by forced displacement. Gorom Refugee camp is located 24 km from Juba city. It has an estimated refugee population of 23471 who are mainly of Ethiopian nationality. The Anyuak refugees from Ethiopia have been in Gorom settlement since 2011. UNHCR and ACROSS carried out the nutrition survey in Gorom refugee camp from 16 to 20 September 2019. The overall aim of this survey was to assess the general nutrition and health status of refugee population and formulate workable recommendations for appropriate nutritional and public health interventions. UNHCR population figures from ProGres were used to determine the total population and that of children 6-59 months for survey planning purposes. At the end of August 2019, the Gorom refugee population was 2347 individuals. 395 (16.8%) of these were children under five years. An exhaustive survey was conducted in relation to children as the total population size of Gorom camp was below 2,500 people rendering sampling unnecessary following UNHCR SENS guideline. All children aged 6-59 months in the camp were surveyed. A total of six survey teams composed of four members each (one team leader, one haemoglobin measurer, one anthropometric measurer/translator and one anthropometric/haemoglobin measurement assistant were included in each survey. A standardized training lasting five days, which included a standardization test was provided. Data collection lasted five days. The survey teams were supported by a team of 2 supervisors and 1 coordinator who roved between the teams duration the data collection. Mobile phone questionnaires using Open Data Kit (ODK) android software was used for data collection for all the modules. Data validation was carried out daily by the survey coordinator, which allowed for daily feedback to the survey teams. Data analysis was carried out using ENA for SMART July 9th, 2015 version for anthropometric indices and Epi info version 7 for all the other data.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: December 05, 2020-December 22, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of CBI recipients. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. This CBI PDM took place in the Est (Kadeï and Lom & Djerem) and Nord (Mayo Rey) regions of Cameroon in December 2020 following the cash intervention in mid-November 2020. More than 5,000 households were provided with cash with the objective of supporting basic needs and self-reliance. 400 beneficiary households were randomly sampled for the PDM.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: December 08, 2020-December 14, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This dataset was collected as a complement to UN Global Pulse, UNHCR, Durham University, WHO and OCHA's study on simulation models to help with COVID-19 planning in world’s largest refugee settlement. The spread of infectious diseases such as COVID-19 presents many challenges to healthcare systems and infrastructures across the world, exacerbating inequalities and leaving the world’s most vulnerable populations most affected. Given their density and available infrastructure, refugee and internally displaced person (IDP) settlements can be particularly susceptible to disease spread. This survey collected data on individual's contact, interactions and time spent in public zones of refugees' camps in Cox's Bazar, in order to fill spreading matrices to inform this simulation of spread.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 03, 2019-April 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 433 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2019 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between October 2019 and April 2020, and were performed by teams composed of at least two members, one from the shelter team and one from the protection unit. The form has two main sections, one focusing on technical aspects, the other on protection. A few changes to the questionnaire were introduced in 2019, mainly to capture the feedback on cash based interventions; all changes, though, comply with the principle of preserving the comparability of data and findings across the implementation years. The monitored sample covers repairs completed in the geographic areas of four of the five UNHCR offices in eastern Ukraine: Mariupol, Sloviansk and Sievierodonetsk in governmentcontrolled areas (GCA); and Donetsk in non government-controlled areas (NGCA). Last year, Luhansk office in NGCA was not allowed to implement field visits and therefore could not contribute to the 20192 monitoring exercise. The 433 monitoring visits on which this report is based represent 33 per cent of the 1,316 repairs conducted in 2019 by UNHCR, in line with last year’s already satisfactory achievement.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 21, 2019-October 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Surveys (SENS) provide regular nutrition data that plays a key role in delivering effective and timely interventions to ensure good nutritional outcomes among populations affected by forced displacement. UNHCR in collaboration with AHA, IRC and WFP carried out the nutrition survey in Pamir and Ajoung Thok refugee camps from 21 to 31 October 2019. Pamir and Ajoung Thok are the official refugee camps in Pariang County, Unity State. No nutrition survey was carried out in Yida as comprehensive services were not provided in 2019 considering its exit strategy. Refugees from Yida continue to be relocated to Pamir and Ajoung Thok refugee camps. The overall aim of the survey was to assess the nutrition situation among the refugee population and to monitor ongoing programme interventions. In each of the camps a cross- sectional survey was conducted using the UNHCR Standardised Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) version 2, 2013 guidelines (http://sens.unhcr.org/) and the Standardised Monitoring and Assessments of Relief and Transitions (SMART) guidelines (https://smartmethodology.org/). Systematic random sampling was used to identify the survey respondents. The surveys had a total of 4 modules consisting of 3 individual level and 1 household level questionnaires following UNHCR SENS guidelines version 2, 2013. The modules included: 1. Anthropometry and health targeting all children aged 6 to 59 months in all the sampled households; 2. Anaemia targeting all children aged 6 to 59 months in all the sampled households and all non-pregnant women aged 15 to 49 years in every other sampled household, 3. Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) targeting all children aged 0 to 23 months in all the sampled households; 4. Food security targeting every other sampled household. The Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) and mosquito net coverage modules were not carried out. This is because there is a WASH monitoring system in place and WASH Knowledge Attitude and Practices (KAP) assessment was conducted within the same month as the nutrition survey. Information on mosquito net coverage was carried out within the year in Pamir and Ajoung Thok in a separate partner assessment. The Emergency Nutrition Assessment (ENA) software version July 9th, 2015 was used to calculate the sample sizes of children and households for participating in the survey. A total of six survey teams composed of four members each (one team leader, one hemoglobin measurer, one anthropometric measurer/translator and one hemoglobin/anthropometric measurement assistant) were included in each survey. A standardized training lasting five days, which included a standardization test was provided. Data collection lasted eight days from 21-31 October with a two days break on the 26 and 27 October 2019. The survey teams were supported by a team of 5 supervisors and 3 coordinators who roved between the teams during the data collection. Mobile phone questionnaires using Open Data Kit (ODK) android software was used for data collection for the four modules of SENS. Data validation was carried out daily by the survey coordinator and supervisors. This facilitated daily feedback to the survey teams. Data analysis used ENA for SMART July 9th, 2015 version for anthropometricindices and Epi info version 7 for the rest of the indicators.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: April 01, 2021-June 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. For this assessment of non-food items, 2292 individuals recepients of soap kits were interviewed, and were asked questions about quality, sufficiency of quantity and usefulness of such kits. The survey also includes questions on other preferred items and use of negative coping mechanisms for livelihoods.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 04, 2019-October 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Surveys (SENS) provide regular nutrition data that plays a key role in delivering effective and timely interventions to ensure good nutritional outcomes among populations affected by forced displacement. UNHCR in collaboration with its partners, coordinated a SENS survey in Maban County between November 16th and December 4th in 2019. Maban County is in Upper Nile State in the North East of the Republic of South Sudan (RoSS). The refugee caseload is composed of Sudanese fleeing from the conflict in Blue Nile State in Sudan, residing in four refugee camps; Doro, Yusuf Batil, Gendrassa and Kaya. The overall aim of the survey was to assess the nutrition situation among the refugee population and to monitor ongoing programme interventions. In each of the camps a cross- sectional survey was conducted using the UNHCR Standardised Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) version 2, 2013 guidelines http://sens.unhcr.org/ and the Standardised Monitoring and Assessments of Relief and Transitions (SMART) guidelines https://smartmethodology.org/ . Systematic random sampling was used to identify the survey respondents. Three population groups; children 6-59 months, infants 0-5 months and women of reproductive age 15-49 years were included in the survey. Household level indicators on food security were measured in households whether they included the target population groups or not. A total of six survey teams composed of four members each (one team leader, one haemoglobin measurer, one anthropometric measurer and one anthropometric/haemoglobin measurement assistant carried out data collection in Doro camp. Data collection in the rest of the three camps (Gendrassa, Kaya and Yusuf Batil) was carried out by ten teams of four members. Two standardised trainings lasting five and four days respectively were conducted for Doro and the rest of the camps. The training included a standardisation and pilot test. The survey teams were supported by a team of 5 supervisors and 2 coordinators who roved between the teams during the data collection. Mobile phone questionnaires using Open Data Kit (ODK) android software for all the modules was used for data collection. Data validation was carried out daily by the survey coordinator/supervisors which allowed for daily feedback to the survey teams. Data analysis is currently on-going using ENA for SMART July 9th, 2015 version for anthropometric indices and Epi info version 7.2.3.1 for all other data.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 07, 2019-October 10, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Surveys (SENS) provide regular nutrition data that plays a key role in delivering effective and timely interventions to ensure good nutritional outcomes among populations affected by forced displacement. UNHCR and WVI carried out a nutrition survey in Makpandu from 7 to 10 October 2019. Makpandu refugee settlement has an estimated refugee population of 50382 who are mainly from DRC and CAR, and a few from Sudan and Eritrea. The overall aim of this survey was to assess the general nutrition and health status of refugee population and formulate workable recommendations for appropriate nutritional and public health interventions. The survey was based on the UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) guidelines for refugee populations (version 2, 2013) http://sens.unhcr.org/. Four SENS modules including i. anthropometric and health, ii. Anaemia, iii. IYCF, and iv. Food Security were carried out. 2019 was the first-time modules ii, iii and iv were carried out thus the data from these modules will be used as the baseline. A total of six survey teams composed of four members each (one team leader, one haemoglobin measurer, one anthropometric measurer/translator and one anthropometric/haemoglobin measurement assistant) were included in each survey. A standardised training lasting four days was provided followed which included a standardisation test. Data collection lasted four days. The survey teams were supported by a team of 2 supervisors and 2 coordinators who roved between the teams during the data collection. Mobile phone questionnaires using Open Data Kit (ODK) android software for all the modules was used for data collection. Data validation was carried out on a daily by the survey coordinator which allowed for daily feedback to the survey teams
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2018-December 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2015-December 31, 2015
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2014-December 31, 2014
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2016-December 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2010-December 31, 2010
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2011-December 31, 2011
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2012-December 31, 2012
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2013-December 31, 2013
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
  • Updated 16 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-March 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. For this assessment, 1971 women recepients of menstrual hygiene management kits were interviewed, whom answered questions about sanitary pads and underwear. 235 men were interviewed, 182 of whom answered questions about sanitary pads and underwear. These responses were excluded from the analysis.
  • Updated 16 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 08, 2021-March 31, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. For this assessment of non-food items, 2517 individuals recepients of soap kits were interviewed, and were asked questions about quality, sufficiency of quantity and usefulness of such kits. The survey also includes questions on other preferred items and use of negative coping mechanisms for livelihoods.
  • 1100+ Downloads
    Updated 16 December 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2012-June 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    Data collated by UNHCR, containing information about forcibly displaced populations and stateless persons, spanning across more than 70 years of statistical activities. The data includes the countries / territories of asylum and origin. Specific resources are available for end-year population totals, demographics, asylum applications, decisions, and solutions availed by refugees and IDPs (resettlement, naturalisation or returns).