UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency
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  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 16, 2020-May 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The present PDM was conducted under time and resource constraints related to COVID-19 emergency. Due to the restrictions on public gathering and partial restrictions on movements, the survey findings could not have been triangulated with the FGDs or market assessment, which will be an integral part of all subsequent PDMs. The PDM household survey data collection took place over three days on 25 - 27 March 2020. ProGres V4 data of Kalobeyei persons of concern was used as a sampling frame, with a sample drawn using stratified random sampling based on random numbers generation. The original sample included over 400 households (adjusted for a non-response rate) aiming at a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of 5. However, the enumerators managed to conduct 457 interviews with respondents added through convenience sampling. Due to poor quality of some of the records, however, only 388 data entries were validated. This nevertheless allows us to remain within the same degree of precision in the inference, although affected by a bias linked to a non-probability sampling.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 21, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 14, 2020-July 17, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The participants of this phone interview were identified using mixed methods. Stratified random sampling were adopted for PoCs based in Kakuma, Kalobeyei, Dadaab and Urban areas. While a census were used for all PoCs who were 18+ years amongst the Shona community; this cohort forms 48.6% of the enumerated population of the Shona people. The survey was conducted at two levels; household and individual. 1,332 households were reached. The survey consent rate was 51 percent. From these households, 3,529 individuals were selected and interviewed.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 13, 2018-February 20, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This study is the result of the socio-demographic and labor analysis of refugee residents in Brazil and represents a milestone in the production of knowledge about the integration of this population into the country. The study shows that most of the interviewees maintain close ties with family, friends and entities located in the countries of origin and, at the same time, demonstrate great knowledge of the Brazilian culture and want to become Brazilian citizens. Nevertheless, they pointed out obstacles to integration, including discriminatory acts. Several factors explain the vulnerability of the refugee population in Brazil: labor market, low wages or insufficient income, difficulty in recognizing diplomas and accessing public or banking services. All these factors, common to a large part of the Brazilian population, have a more striking impact on the quality of life of the refugee population.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 24, 2019-December 19, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR (Cox’s Bazar Field Office) conducted the second round of its WASH Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey from 24th November to 19th December 2019 in UNHCR’s area of operation in Kutupalong and Teknaf. Five WASH partners implemented the survey: NGO Forum, BRAC, OXFAM, Solidarité International and ACF. Preparation began in early November, as UNHCR discussed methodologies with participating agencies. Several meetings focussed on issues such as; staffing for the data collection and financial issues such as ‘per diem’ allowances. Several partner enumerators and their team leaders had no previous experience in KAP surveys, therefore, training modules were developed and implemented by UNHCR WASH staff. The objective of the survey was to better plan and guide future UNHCR WASH interventions implemented through NGO partners.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2017-November 10, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in November 2017 to determine the current Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitude and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 559 HHs (379 in Ajuong Thok and 180 in Pamir) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of ten (10) days. Data was cleaned and analysed in Excel. The findings showed that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 19.5 liters in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly lower than the recommended Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. The average HH size was six people. Refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP) and other health partners. It is recommended that proper water use measures be put in place to reduce water waste and that sanitation and hygiene messaging continue to be provided to improve sanitation and hygiene, with access to, and use of, latrines by refugees.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 08, 2020-June 19, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The COVID- 19 pandemic is having an unprecedented impact on people's lives. The pandemic is no doubt evolving into an economic and labor market downturn affecting all communities. In Zambia, daily status updates by the Ministry of Health indicate that, the cumulative number of cases are nearing 2,000 (as of 10th July 2020). The pandemic has further compounded the already distressed macroeconomic outlook. Cognisant of the resultant effect on economic systems, including trade restrictions, limited mobility of people and goods, and restricted movement in and out of the refugee settlements, a multi- stakeholder rapid assessment was conducted (2,796 respondents) during the period 8th to 19th June to quantify /determine measurable impact on refugees and hosting community livelihoods. The rapid survey was conducted in Lusaka and in the three refugee settlements and hosting villages of Zambia based on stratified random sampling.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: September 01, 2019-September 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The purpose of the WASH KAP survey was to collect primary data on several indicators related to the WASH Program implemented in the refugee and host communities of Palabek Settlement, Uganda. The survey aimed at assessing the level of improvement on the accessibility of WASH facilities after a 2 year intervention project. The survey used cross-sectional design used and both qualitative and quantitative techniques such as use of UNHCR standard WASH questionnaires, field visits and observations were employed during the study. In the 2019/20, the LWF provided WASH services to both refugee settlements and host community living in and around Palabek settlement. In order to gauge the coverage, the LWF conducted this KAP survey. The respondents were drawn from the host community (238 households) and the refugee settlement (446 households).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2018-November 11, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in November 2018 to determine the current Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitudes and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 1,040 HHs (520 HHs in each location) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of 10 days. Data was cleaned and analyzed in Excel. The summary of the results is presented in this report. The findings showed that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 21, in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly higher than the recommended Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. This is a slight improvement from the 19.5 liters reported the previous year. The average HH size was six people. Women comprised 83.2% of the surveyed respondents and males 16.8%. Almost all the respondents were refugees, constituting 99.6%. The refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP), Africa Humanitarian Action (AHA) and International Rescue Committee (IRC). Most refugees had knowledge about keeping water containers clean, washing hands during critical times, safe excreta disposal and disease prevention.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 01, 2018-October 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2019-April 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 01, 2018-April 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 01, 2019-March 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2018-March 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 01, 2019-January 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2019-March 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2018-March 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 01, 2019-March 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The size of the outflows from Venezuela sharply increased from some 700,000 in 2015 to over 4 million by June 2019, largely driven by a substantial deterioration of the situation in the country. Given the disruption of the functioning of some democratic institutions and rule of law, and its impact on the preservation of security, economic stability, health, public peace and the general welfare system, the crisis continues to worsen and serious human rights violations are widely reported. The displacement outside Venezuela has mostly affected countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, particularly Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and the southern Caribbean islands. Most governments in the region have made efforts to facilitate access to territory, documentation and access to services, but the capacity of host countries has become overstretched to address the increasing protection and integration needs, resulting in tighter border controls being put in place. Protection monitoring is a core UNHCR activity which aims at ensuring an adequate and timely understanding of the protection situation of persons affected by forced displacement. The action-oriented nature of protection monitoring allows UNHCR to adapt to the needs and protection risks faced by persons displaced outside Venezuela and informs a broad range of responses.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 04, 2018-June 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report presents the findings of the profiling activities conducted from June to August 2018 in communities hosting internally displaced persons (IDPs) of the Marawi conflict and return communities in the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon. Data was collected through structured interviews with IDP households using the kobo™ tool. Primary respondents were heads of households and in their absence, any person of legal age in the family. A total of 34,785 heads of households were interviewed in the profiling activity, representing 97,126 IDPs in 56 municipalities and 3 cities. This report presents data on demographic makeup of the IDPs such as age, sex, number of households, and family size, as well as protection information relating to displacement location, place of origin, resettlement, integration; various vulnerabilities of persons with special needs; educational attainment; income livelihood and skills; access to assistance; access to information; civil documentation; property ownership; intent to return; access to information, assistance received, and sources of assistance. Special focus is given on children and women in separate sections of this report. A significant number of IDPs continue to experience gaps in assistance related to health, education, shelter and long-term livelihood support. Also, IDPs continue to experience protection risks due to lack of civil documentation due to loss or destruction of birth certificates. A more nuanced and targeted approach that will address specific protection needs of IDPs is needed.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2019-November 21, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    A Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in October 2019 to determine the current Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitudes and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 1,474 HHs (735 HHs in Ajuong Thok and 739 HHs in Pamir) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of 21 days. Data was cleaned and analyzed in Excel. The summary of the results is presented in this report. The findings show that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 23.4, in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly higher than the recommended United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. This is a slight improvement from the 21 liters reported the previous year. The average HH size was six people. Women comprised 83% of the surveyed respondents and males 17%. Almost all the respondents were refugees, constituting 99.5% (n=1,466). The refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP) and other health partners. Most refugees had knowledge about keeping the water containers clean, washing hands during critical times, safe excreta disposal and disease prevention.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 22, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: December 02, 2019-December 09, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report presents findings, discussions, conclusions and recommendations made following a survey of the Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) among refugees in Kakuma refugee camps and Kalobeyei settlement in Turkana West in Turkana County, Kenya. Two principle methods were used to collect primary data: household questionnaire and documents review in a summative evaluation approach. The survey adopted a summative evaluation approach and a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods were used to obtain answers to the survey questions. The mixed approach was adopted for purposes of complementary, triangulation, and validation of responses. Primary data was collected with the use of household questionnaires, Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) and review of existing literatures and reports. The inclusive criteria of the survey allowed the enumerators to collect data from household heads or any household member of age 18 years and above who consented to participate in the survey. Qualitative methods mainly KIIs were also adopted in order to gather an in-depth understanding of the perspectives of the various primary targets of the programme. These included households, members of WASH Committees, NRC staff and staff from the implementing partner agencies. Observation method was also used during the survey to assess WASH infrastructure and human habits. The infrastructure included; water points, sanitation and hygiene facilities. The stratified random sampling survey was carried out in in the 4 camps of Kakuma and the 3 villages of Kalobeyei. In Kakuma, all the 13 zones were included in the study for significant representation. The study population comprised all the households for the 192,352 refugees and asylum seekers registered in Kakuma camp (153,593) and Kalobeyei settlement (36,099) as per UNHCR population statistics of August 2019. The respondents were sampled household heads or family members aged 18 years and above. Although teachers who are patrons of school health clubs where institutional latrines had been done were targeted for interview, they were not reached due to school vacation.