UNHCR - The UN Refugee Agency
Last updated on 28 February 2021
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  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Malawi. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (87 observations) and endline data (78 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 06, 2017-March 29, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    This survey was conducted to help UNHCR's Malawi office in its multi-year, multi-partnership planning and programming. The main objective was to provide an overview of the livelihood and vulnerability situation of refugees and host families in Malawi. The survey covered Dzaleka and Luwani refugee camps as well as households living in villages surrounding the two camps. Dzaleka camp is well established and has been in existence since 1994 and hosts households from a number of neighboring countries, including Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burundi and others. Luwani camp is relatively new and much smaller camp that hosts exclusively Mozambican asylum seekers whose status was not yet determined at the time of the survey. The survey covered 1,026 refugee households (802 in Dzaleka and 224 in Luwani) during March 2017.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 05, 2016-May 25, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    There is a growing interest in the consequences of hosting refugees for local populations. Such consequences need not to be unfavorable and in many instances the presence of refugees results in direct and indirect benefits for host communities. This survey was conducted to examine the influence of Congolese refugees on host communities in Rwanda, with a focus on labor market activity and economic welfare. The survey covered three refugee camps as well as their surrounding host communities. Data was collected in May 2016 and covers 427 refugee households and 953 host households.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 11, 2017-May 29, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Afghanistan hosts a protracted population of Pakistani refugees, who fled North Waziristan Agency in 2014 as a result of a joint military offensive by Pakistani government forces against non-state armed groups. As of May 2017, UNHCR has biometrically registered over 50,000 refugees in Khost province and 36,000 refugees in Paktika province, where access remains a challenge. Over 16,000 of these refugees receive shelter and essential services in the Gulan camp in Khost province, while most of the others live among the host population in various urban and rural locations. To better understand the needs of the refugees and the host communities, UNHCR and WFP agreed to conduct a joint assessment of Pakistani refugees in Khost and Paktika. The data collection commenced in May 2017 and covered 2,638 refugee households (2,198 in Khost and 440 in Paktika).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Mozambique. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (42 observations) and endline data (25 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2018-May 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2018) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its sixth year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million Syrian refugees who have fled their country’s conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2018). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains the largest concentration of refugees per capita and the fourth largest refugee population in the world. VASyR includes a sample of 4,446 Syrian refugee households from 26 districts across Lebanon. The assessment demonstrates that despite the large scale assistance and the efforts of Lebanon and its partners that have resulted in improvements in economic vulnerability and stabilization in education, food security and some improvements in the situation for women, girls and female-headed households, Syrian refugees still remain very vulnerable. The economic context remains precarious and the protection needs to persist.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Jordan. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. The data includes 91 baseline observations, and 84 endline observations.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Guinea. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (211 observations) and endline data (139 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. Empty values can occur for several reasons (e.g. no occurrence of agricultural interventions among the beneficiaries will result in empty variables for the agricultural module).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Ghana. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (142 observations) and endline data (130 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Burkina Faso. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of endline (100 observations) data, empty variables might refer to questions which were not relevant for this survey (e.g. baseline questions).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Somalia. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (236 observations) and endline data (201 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Kenya. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (115 observations) and endline data (105 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Chad. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (331 observations) and endline data (308 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Argentina. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline (21 observations) and endline data (6 observations) from the same sample beneficiaries.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2014, UNHCR has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the framework for monitoring UNHCR Livelihoods and Economic Inclusion programs. Since 2017, mobile data collection (survey) tools have been rolled out globally, including in Ethiopia. The participating operations conducted a household survey to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of endline (147 observations) data.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2015-March 31, 2015
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health (MINSANTE) and all of its partners decided to carry out a SENS survey in all the sites developed for Central African refugees in the East and Adamawa regions in the period from January to March 2015. This is an extensive nutritional survey that includes six modules: anthropometry and health, anemia, Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF), Food security, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, and Mosquito net coverage. This edition is the first of this kind of investigation into the operation to assist Central African refugees in Cameroon. Its interest is linked to the fact that it is a scientific work which provides basic information in several sensitive areas. Also it will serve as a basis for decision-making and orientation of ongoing projects, and then make advocacy for fundraising. This assessment is also part of a continuous monitoring of the nutritional situation of these refugee populations over time.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: October 23, 2017-October 27, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    This assessment was carried out in Zimbabwe's Tongogara Refugee Camp. Its aim was to help UNHCR better understand refugees' and asylum seekers' living conditions and needs, which in turn will inform priority setting, programming and advocacy. The assessment was underpinned by the objectives of the "Graduation Approach" which targets support to the ultra-poor amongst the refugee population. A quantitative survey was conducted among 386 households during October 2017.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2018-October 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    In late December 2017, the northeaster Ituri province of DRC experienced inter-ethnic violence which resulted in displacement of tens of thousands of civilians crossing the border to Uganda. Close to 60,000 refugees arrived in the Kyangwali settlement in a few months’ time, creating a humanitarian emergency which was aggravated by the outbreak of cholera. This called for a number of WASH agencies to begin operating in the settlement in response to the emergency with the objective to improve access to potable water supply and improved hygiene and sanitation facilities. The WASH forum decided to conduct a KAP survey to gauge the level of WASH services against acceptable standards and assess existing gaps to facilitate evidence based planning of future programs. The survey includes 384 refugee households in the Kyangwali refugee settlement.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2018-November 01, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The WASH KAP Uganda Palorinya survey 2018 was implemented by NRC to provide a benchmark on the status of the WASH situation of Refugees in Zone 3 of the settlement. This part had an estimated 69000 people, and for this part, NRC was selected as UNHCR's implementing partner for WASH activities. The sample includes 402 households, randomly selected from the west and east of Zone 3.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2019-June 24, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee populations to support humanitarian planning and enhance operational and strategic decision-making. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the mid-term review of the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP), with the specific objective of enabling the tracking of JRP 2019 indicators for monitoring and review purposes. A total of 876 households were surveyed across 33 refugee sites. This J-MSNA was funded by UNHCR and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) and comprised of: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 05, 2019-September 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Ensuring adequate and safe shelter for the refugees has been the core part of UNHCR's response in the Rohingya Refugee Crisis Operation from the beginning of influx. Moving forward from emergency shelter kits (ESK) distribution to upgrade shelter kits (USK) distribution, in 2019 UNHCR has initiated a need based targeted shelter repair and replacement assistance to maintain adequate shelter conditions. In line with this approach, condition of the shelters have been assessed in order to identify the individual shelter needs and specific needs of vulnerable families by the technical staff of shelter partners according to criteria and information have been collected through GIS tool. A total of 59,920 shelters were assessed. Based on the outcome of the assessment, most vulnerable shelters have been provided shelter support for Repair and Replacement and less vulnerable shelters are also receiving support for repair and replacement.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 14, 2018-May 20, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Rohingya refugee population living in settlements in Cox’s Bazar is dependent on international assistance. Presently, there are limits on how self-sufficient refugees can be, as they have restricted freedom of movement beyond the areas where the settlements are and also have no right to work. In addition, there is insufficient land within their settlements to support subsistence farming. As a result, many refugees are unable to access cash independently to support themselves, and many struggle for the basic necessities not already covered by humanitarian assistance. All current assistance in the form of in-kind distributions and services are free of charge. This includes, for example, food, shelter materials, household items and health services. A number of cash-for-work schemes were designed to support and manage some of the basic services and works in the camps; however, to date, they have not created sufficient income opportunities for refugees or host communities. Likewise, our teams have confirmed that some humanitarian aid items are being sold at local markets. This shows refugees are adopting other, and potentially harmful, coping mechanisms to generate cash for their needs that are not, or not fully, covered by current humanitarian assistance. Negative coping strategies such as food borrowing, reduction in the number of meals and reduced consumption of preferred foods are witnessed across the entire Rohingya refugee population. Between April and May 2018, UNHCR piloted the delivery of unconditional and unrestricted Multipurpose Cash Grants (MPGs) to cover unmet basic needs. This extended to all residents of Camp 5 and Camp 6 in the Kutupalong refugee settlement and was equivalent to approximately half of the monthly Minimum Expenditure Basket (MEB) for a family of five. After completing the delivery of the grants, UNHCR conducted a detailed Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) survey (320 households were interviewed). A Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) survey is a mechanism to collect and understand refugees’ feedback on the assistance provided by humanitarian agencies like UNHCR. PDMs are widely used by UNHCR and help to evaluate the effectiveness of the assistance provided directly by UNHCR or through its partners. A PDM is conducted independently from the distribution exercise itself, but closely following it in time. This PDM was intended to evaluate the adequacy of the cash grant provided as well as patterns in its use. It also sought to identify challenges and constraints experienced, and seek refugees’ feedback on any improvements required to implement similar assistance again in the future. The PDM supports a hypothesis that the current basic in-kind assistance packages provided to refugees are not sufficient to meet all demonstrated needs, with the result that potentially harmful coping mechanisms like selling assistance are employed. The adoption of this cash programme by UNHCR, therefore, seeks to ensure that refugees can address their multiple needs in accordance with their household and personal priorities, including benefits such as greater access to a more diversified diet, better hygiene or shelter improvements.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 29, 2018-September 06, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 25 August 2017, human rights violations and targeted violence against the Rohingya community in Rakhine State, Myanmar, have forced over 728,0002 of them to seek sanctuary in Bangladesh. Half of the refugees (55%) are children. Within two months of the first arrivals, the number of refugee population in Cox’s Bazar district quadrupled, which made it the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world. The refugees continued to arrive by foot and boat in subsequent months. Most of them came with few belongings or cash. UNHCR was among the first humanitarian organisations to respond to the refugee influx with life-saving assistance. Packages of blankets, plastic sheets, sleeping mats, family tents, plastic rolls, kitchen sets, jerry cans and buckets were distributed initially to 250,000 refugees within weeks after their arrival. By end of August 2018, UNHCR distributed 93,803 Core Relief Item (CRI) packages to newly arrived refugee families, each containing tarpaulins, kitchen set, blanket, jerry can, bucket, sleeping mat and solar lamp. At the same time, 90,524 families received Upgrade Shelter Kit (USK) consisting of mulli and borak bamboos, rope, plastic tarpaulins, sandbags and toolkits, to reinforce their shelters for the monsoon season. UNHCR, in close collaboration with partner agencies and other humanitarian actors, continues to support the Government of Bangladesh in responding to the refugee crisis by ensuring relief items are prepositioned and delivered to the most vulnerable refugees and host communities in a timely manner. UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugee’s feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilisation and effectiveness of assistance received. It is conducted after the distribution of relief items is completed. A total of 2,298 households were interviewed in this PDM. The PDM survey confirmed that non-food packages distributed by UNHCR and partners met the household needs and minimum quality standard as agreed by the Shelter/NFI Sector in Cox’s Bazar. The overall satisfaction score has improved from the previous survey in March. The refugees reported high satisfaction for the items received, and rated above 4.1 on a 5-point Likert scale for the items quality and usefulness. They also reported general satisfaction with the organisation of NFI distribution, with an average score of 4.0 on the Likert scale. The finding shows that UNHCR and partners are fulfilling their commitment to provide relief items that meet the specific needs of refugees, and that they were distributed in a timely and efficient manner.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2019-November 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Uganda is hosting over 1 million refugees with about 114,716 (OPM Nov 2019) of them settled in Kyangwali refugee settlement. This rapid influx of refugees has put pressure on basic social services including education, food, shelter and WASH infrastructure. In order to efficiently and effectively improve WASH service delivery in the settlement, there is need for accurate and reliable information on which to base programmatic decisions. Kyangwali settlement has had a number of interventions by different partners, and in as much as there were access indicators obtained regularly by the partners that provide extremely useful average figures at settlement level, there has been a gap in the in-depth understanding of the situation at household level and to account for disparities within the settlement so as to measure the impact of the interventions. The survey mainly utilized 2 methods: Household questionnaire survey and documentary review. The survey covered all the five zones of the settlement, with samples drawn from all the villages in the different zones. Sample sizes for each zone were calculated using the UNHCR sample size determination tool. A sample of 403 (only refugees) was interviewed using household questionnaire survey administered through Kobo collect and Open Data Kit (ODK) tool. Reviewed documents included: partners periodic updates, minutes of WASH meetings.