UN Operational Satellite Applications Programme (UNOSAT)
Last updated on 23 September 2021
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  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 26 April 2019 | Dataset date: April 23, 2019-April 23, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Just over a month after the tropical cyclone IDAI-19 a new tropical storm is heading toward Comoros, Tanzania and the north of Mozambique called 'twentyfour-19'. The category 2 tropical storm is expected to make landfall between the 27th and the 28th of April 2018 south of Mocimboa da Praia town located in the province of Cabo Delgado in the extreme northern part of Mozambique. Based on data of the expected tropical cyclone path Twentyfour-19, wind speeds zones from Joint Research Centre (Issued on 23 April 2019 06:00 UTC), and population data from WorldPop 2015, UNITAR-UNOSAT conducted a population exposure analysis for Mozambique. About 750,000 people in Mozambique, mainly in Cabo Delgado province are living inside the wind speed zones of 120 km/h, 90 km/h and 60 km/h accordingly. Cyclone track: Joint Research Centre (JRC) as of 23/04/2019 Wind speed zones: Joint Research Centre (JRC) as of 23/04/2019, 06:00 UTC Administrative Levels: OCHA ROSEA Spatial Demographic Data: WorldPop (2015), 100m spatial resolution Analysis: UNITAR-UNOSAT (23/04/2019)
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 10 April 2019 | Dataset date: March 29, 2019-March 29, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This map illustrates the satellite detected surface waters in Masvingo Province, Zimbabwe, as observed from the Sentinel-1 data imageries acquired on 12 and 24 March 2019. Within the analysis extent, over Manicaland Province, 84,500 ha of surface waters were observed the 12 March 2019. and about of 288,500 ha of surface waters were observed the 24 March 2019. It represents an icrease of 29 %. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT. Satellite data (pre-event) : Sentinel-1 Imagery date: 12 March 2019 Resolution: 10 m Copyright: Copernicus 2019 / ESA Source: ESA Satellite data (post-event) : Sentinel-1 Imagery date: 24 March 2019 Resolution: 10 m Copyright: Copernicus 2019 / ESA Source: ESA Boundary data: OCHA ROSEA Water body & waterway: COD Analysis : UNITAR-UNOSAT Production: UNITAR - UNOSAT
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 10 April 2019 | Dataset date: March 29, 2019-March 29, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This map illustrates the satellite detected surface waters in Mashonaland East Province, Zimbabwe, as observed from the Sentinel-1 data imageries acquired on 12 and 24 March 2019. Within the analysis extent, over Manicaland Province, 108,780 ha of surface waters were observed the 12 March 2019. and about of 469,680 ha of surface waters were observed the 24 March 2019. It represents an icrease of 23 %. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT. Satellite data (pre-event) : Sentinel-1 Imagery date: 12 March 2019 Resolution: 10 m Copyright: Copernicus 2019 / ESA Source: ESA Satellite data (post-event) : Sentinel-1 Imagery date: 24 March 2019 Resolution: 10 m Copyright: Copernicus 2019 / ESA Source: ESA Boundary data: OCHA ROSEA Water body & waterway: COD Analysis : UNITAR-UNOSAT Production: UNITAR - UNOSAT
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 10 April 2019 | Dataset date: April 09, 2019-April 09, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This map illustrates satellite-detected surface waters in Tete and Zambezia province, Mozambique as observed from Sentinel-1 imagery acquired on 7 April 2019. Within the analysed extent of about 7,800 sq km, a total about 100 sq km of lands appear to be flooded as of 7 April 2019. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT. Satellite Data (Post): Sentinel-1 Imagery Date (1): 7 April 2019 Imagery Date (2): 20 March 2019 Resolution: 10 m Copyright: Copernicus 2019 / ESA Source: ESA
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 20 March 2018 | Dataset date: March 31, 2017-March 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every year
    .A large scale landslide inventory was carried out by a team from the University of Twente, use of 5 scenes of Pléiades satellite imageries with resolution of 0.5m, which were obtained in September 23 and October 5 after the hurricane, made available through UNITAR-UNOSAT. Apart from these also a series of Digital Globe Images were used that were collected for the Google Crisis Response through a KML layer. The images were visually interpreted by image interpretation experts, and landslides were mapped as polygons, separating scarp, transport and accumulation areas, and classifying the landslides in types. A total of 9,960 landslides were identified, which include 8,576 debris slides, 1,010 debris flows and 374 rock falls, with area of 7.30km2, 2.50km2, and 0.50 km2 respectively. The whole area of landslide is 10.30 km2, which covers 1.37 percent of the island. The source of landslides is 3.30km2, and the other 7.0 km2 is transportation and deposition area. Almost all of the rivers flooded due to intensive precipitation. The flooded area is 13.03km2, which covers 1.74% of the island. Dominica will face some new problems for mountain hazards in the coming years, as many of the fresh scarps may produce more debris, and many tree trunks are still on the slopes or in the river channels. With so many fresh landslides in the upper catchments, it is likely that debris flows will be triggered with rainfall thresholds that are substantially lower than before the hurricane. Hurricane Maria damaged the forest cover dramatically, which changed the conditions for hazard initiation. Without the protection of vegetation, more new shallow landslides could happen in the near future. A series of cascading hazards may happen, for example landslides or debris flow blocking rivers and resulting in outburst floods. Therefore more detailed evaluation of the post-Maria hazard and risk situation is very important.