• Information Package for Fiji Evacuation Tracking & Monitoring Cycle 2
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 15 April 2021 | Dataset date: July 14, 2020-September 23, 2020
    The eighth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between July 14 and September 23, 2020, a total of 9,634 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 61 districts in Iraq (including 40 formal camps).
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    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Updated 7 April 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-January 11, 2021
    A village assessment survey (VAS) is a sub-component of mobility tracking. It collects data on returning IDPs, IDPs, returned migrants and host community members. VAS evaluates the absorption capacity of villages to receive returning IDPs with a focus on accessibility of services, livelihoods and reintegration.
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    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • Updated 18 March 2021 | Dataset date: September 01, 2019-September 01, 2019
    MCNA conducted at household level nationwide in Iraq. The MCNA covered all conflict-affected populations: in-camp IDP, out-of-camp IDP, returnee and select host populations, in all accessible districts where target population were present. Sampled on district (ADM 2) level and data collected June - August 2019.
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 18 March 2021 | Dataset date: September 01, 2019-September 01, 2019
    MCNA conducted at household level nationwide in Iraq. The MCNA covered all conflict-affected populations: in-camp IDP, out-of-camp IDP, returnee and select host populations, in all accessible districts where target population were present. Sampled on district (ADM 2) level and data collected June - August 2019.
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    This dataset updates: Every year
  • The dataset contains IDPS and Returnees at sub national level.
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    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Tropical Cyclone Idai made landfall in central Mozambique the night of 14 March 2019. On 27 March 2019, IOM in coordination with the Government of Mozambique carried out site assessments in 32 evacuation sites in the Beira district in the Sofala province of Mozambique one of the provinces affected by the storm.
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    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • Updated 28 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 23, 2018-September 03, 2019
    Since the onset of the Syrian crisis, the humanitarian community has increasingly relied on cash-based assistance provided from donor contributions and implemented by aid partners under the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan to support the affected population. In November 2017, the World Food Programme (WFP) joined the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and non-governmental organisations (NGO) in the delivery of multi-purpose cash (MPC) to assist the most economically vulnerable Syrian refugee households to meet their basic needs. This study aims to measure the short-term (12 months or less) and long-term (more than 12 months) causal impact of the $173.50 and $175 MPC assistance provided by WFP and UNHCR respectively, over and above the $27 per person per month assistance, as well as the impact of discontinuation from MPC on the well-being of Syrian refugees. This report presents the causal impact on multiple dimensions of well-being, namely household expenditures, food security, housing, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), education, employment, health and decision-making. The key take-away messages from the study are: 1. The impact of MPC materialised across most dimensions of well-being in the long-term, indicating the importance of households' access to a longer duration of MPC. 2. The benefits of MPC fade for many indicators within 4 to 10 months after discontinuation, and households' well-being returned to pre-assistance levels for most indicators, and dropped slightly below the pre-assistance baseline for others. 3. The findings would suggest that there are benefits to instituting longer cash cycles and/or linking MPC to other services through a 'cash plus' approach to expand and extend the positive impact of cash on beneficiary households and ensure sustainable impact. A total of 11,457 households were visited and used in this analysis, which constitutes one of the largest samples among impact evaluations conducted in Lebanon to date.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 24 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 16, 2020-November 26, 2020
    This inaugural round of Sudan's Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), conducted by REACH and OCHA in close collaboration with the Inter-Sectoral Coordination Group (ISCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority humanitarian needs of populations across the whole of Sudan. The findings from this assessment are presented in this document and are intended to provide timely updates on key sectoral needs and priorities in order to inform humanitarian response and strategic programming for non-displaced, IDP and refugee households across the country.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 21 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 21 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 19, 2020-September 15, 2020
    Nine years into the Syria conflict, Lebanon remains at the forefront of one of the worst humanitarian crises. The economic downturn, steep inflation, COVID-19 and finally the Beirut blast have pushed vulnerable communities in Lebanon - including Syrian refugees - to the brink, with thousands of families sinking further into poverty. The Government of Lebanon (GoL) estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million1 of the 6.6 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including 879,529 registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2020 ). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains one of the largest concentration of refugees per capita in the world. The 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) was the eighth annual survey assessing the situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their vulnerabilities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic in Lebanon, most assessments and other activities requiring in person visits were either cancelled or postponed. Considering the prolonged socio-economic status in Lebanon and COVID-19, it was crucial to provide needs-based estimates on Syrian refugees in the country. Thus, the VASyR 2020 was one of the few assessments that were conducted face-to-face; the implementation was accompanied by a comprehensive protocol to ensure the safety of families and field workers. The criticality of conducting the VASyR 2020 was to provide insights about Syrian refugees impacted by the political and economic crisis that hit Lebanon in late 2019 and by the COVID-19 outbreak.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • An estimated 723,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the newly-arrived refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources during the journey. The monsoon season began in May and continues into September, threatening the vast majority of refugees living in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the priority needs of the refugees, a Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), comissioned by UNHCR and with technical support from REACH, was conducted at the household level in 31 refugee sites (3,171 households were surveyed). Translators Without Borders supported in questionnaire translation and enumerator training. This survey identified a number of areas where the basic needs of Rohingya refugees are being met. At the same time, this assessment has identified continuing service gaps in the Rohingya response. For example, the majority of households do not believe there is enough light at night to safely access latrines, and WASH facilities are generally perceived as dangerous areas for girls under age 18. In terms of access to protection services, only a small number of households report members making use of children and women friendly spaces. Despite widespread distribution coverage of key non-food items such as kitchen sets, demand for these items remains high, and refugees are spending the greatest portion of their limited financial resources on basic items including food, clothing and fuel. Findings suggest that there are uncertainties around actions to prepare for cyclones. The mahjis remain almost the sole focal point for communication and complaints with refugees, reflecting their continued prominent position within refugee communities. Finally, the median household debt is twice the median household income for the 30 days prior to data collection, with only two-fifths of households reporting any source of income at all.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • An estimated 738,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources on the journey. The cyclone and monsoon seasons, stretching from May to October, further threatened the living conditions of the vast majority of refugees living who are in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the evolving priority needs of the refugees, and to understand change over time, this Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), coordinated by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and with technical support from REACH, was conducted in 33 refugee sites using a household survey methodology (3,165 households were surveyed). It is a follow up assessment to MSNA I in July 2018. Results of this MSNA are generalizable to the camp level with 95% confidence level and 10% margin of error. Support for questionnaire translation and enumerator language training was provided by Translators Without Borders.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2018-May 04, 2018
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2018) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its sixth year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million Syrian refugees who have fled their country’s conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2018). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains the largest concentration of refugees per capita and the fourth largest refugee population in the world. VASyR includes a sample of 4,446 Syrian refugee households from 26 districts across Lebanon. The assessment demonstrates that despite the large scale assistance and the efforts of Lebanon and its partners that have resulted in improvements in economic vulnerability and stabilization in education, food security and some improvements in the situation for women, girls and female-headed households, Syrian refugees still remain very vulnerable. The economic context remains precarious and the protection needs to persist.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee populations to support humanitarian planning and enhance operational and strategic decision-making. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the mid-term review of the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP), with the specific objective of enabling the tracking of JRP 2019 indicators for monitoring and review purposes. A total of 876 households were surveyed across 33 refugee sites. This J-MSNA was funded by UNHCR and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) and comprised of: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 29, 2018-September 06, 2018
    Since 25 August 2017, human rights violations and targeted violence against the Rohingya community in Rakhine State, Myanmar, have forced over 728,0002 of them to seek sanctuary in Bangladesh. Half of the refugees (55%) are children. Within two months of the first arrivals, the number of refugee population in Cox’s Bazar district quadrupled, which made it the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world. The refugees continued to arrive by foot and boat in subsequent months. Most of them came with few belongings or cash. UNHCR was among the first humanitarian organisations to respond to the refugee influx with life-saving assistance. Packages of blankets, plastic sheets, sleeping mats, family tents, plastic rolls, kitchen sets, jerry cans and buckets were distributed initially to 250,000 refugees within weeks after their arrival. By end of August 2018, UNHCR distributed 93,803 Core Relief Item (CRI) packages to newly arrived refugee families, each containing tarpaulins, kitchen set, blanket, jerry can, bucket, sleeping mat and solar lamp. At the same time, 90,524 families received Upgrade Shelter Kit (USK) consisting of mulli and borak bamboos, rope, plastic tarpaulins, sandbags and toolkits, to reinforce their shelters for the monsoon season. UNHCR, in close collaboration with partner agencies and other humanitarian actors, continues to support the Government of Bangladesh in responding to the refugee crisis by ensuring relief items are prepositioned and delivered to the most vulnerable refugees and host communities in a timely manner. UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugee’s feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilisation and effectiveness of assistance received. It is conducted after the distribution of relief items is completed. A total of 2,298 households were interviewed in this PDM. The PDM survey confirmed that non-food packages distributed by UNHCR and partners met the household needs and minimum quality standard as agreed by the Shelter/NFI Sector in Cox’s Bazar. The overall satisfaction score has improved from the previous survey in March. The refugees reported high satisfaction for the items received, and rated above 4.1 on a 5-point Likert scale for the items quality and usefulness. They also reported general satisfaction with the organisation of NFI distribution, with an average score of 4.0 on the Likert scale. The finding shows that UNHCR and partners are fulfilling their commitment to provide relief items that meet the specific needs of refugees, and that they were distributed in a timely and efficient manner.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • The closure of the so-called "Balkan route" and the EU-Turkey Statement in March 2016 changed Greece from a transit country to a country hosting a growing population of refugees and asylum seekers. To address the needs of this growing population staying on the Greek mainland, the Greek Government established Open Reception Facilities (ORFs) in Northern and Central Greece. In the beginning of 2016, UNHCR through its partners established urban accommodation schemes to host asylum seekers eligible for relocation as part of the European solidarity measures. The program evolved to focus on the most vulnerable asylum seekers for whom accommodation in the ORFs was unsuitable. The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) set up a similar accommodation program in late 2016 also focusing on the most vulnerable. Arrivals at the Greek-Turkish land border increased in late 2017 and as a result a higher number of people started arriving directly to Thessaloniki, without having presented themselves to the authorities at the border. Hence, they were not registered by the Greek authorities and as a consequence lacked access to a dignified shelter, or other forms of basic assistance available to asylum seekers and refugees. The Municipality of Thessaloniki and the humanitarian community jointly decided to conduct a profiling exercise of the refugees and asylum seekers hosted in Thessaloniki as well as Third Country Nationals not registered with the Asylum Service in Thessaloniki. The objective was to explore the extent to which refugees and asylum seekers were moving towards local integration. This was done by looking at their outlook for the future as well as the obstacles and possibilities towards greater economic and socio-cultural integration in Greece. The analysis of persons with no asylum service documentation focused on the key challenges faced by those groups, such as lack of a regularized status and homelessness. The collected data would form a baseline for future integration monitoring and would additionally be a useful tool for the implementation of integration activities as foreseen in national and local strategies for integration. The survey included a total of 861 households. The survey found out that the great majority of refugees and asylum seekers in the accommodation scheme and in the ORF had been in Thessaloniki less than one year. The majority of the households in the accommodation scheme (60%) reported that they intended to stay in Thessaloniki in the long term, and one of the main conditions for being able to integrate locally is finding employment. Amongst the households in the ORF, less than half intended to stay in Thessaloniki (45%) and more than a third (38%) intended to move to another EU country. For those intending to stay, being able to integrate locally was very much linked to finding a different accommodation solution. The households having found their own accommodation were on average living longer in Thessaloniki, as almost half of them had lived in the city for more than one year compared to other groups who have been living in their majority in their accommodation for less than one year. This group of refugees and asylum seekers also included the biggest group reporting that they intended to stay in Thessaloniki longer term (76%). For them the main condition for local integration was access to employment and getting the status of international protection. Accessing employment as a key condition for local integration was also highlighted and confirmed during community consultations with asylum seekers and refugees.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2019) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to provide a multi-sectoral update of the situation and to identify changes and trends. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). Survey teams visited 4,727 randomly selected Syrian refugee households, covering all districts across Lebanon. The result of the study demonstrates that while some improvements in specific indicators are noted, Syrian refugees in Lebanon continue to show heightened vulnerabilities. While rates of birth registration have seen an increase since previous years, other legal documentation issues (e.g. legal residency) remains to be an on-going challenge. About half of households are living in extreme poverty, despite large scale assistance programs to families. Additionally, while rent prices were not noted to increase dramatically, many families continue to live in substandard and over-crowded conditions across the country.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2016-December 31, 2016
    A collaborative profiling exercise was conducted with the aim to provide a comprehensive analysis of the displacement situation in urban and peri-urban areas across 9 Governorates in South and Central Iraq. The study was a collaborative effort of a Technical Working Group consisting of staff from MoDM’s Department of Information and Research, UNHCR staff, and with the support of the Joint IDP Profiling Service (JIPS) and Statistics Norway. The methodology and tools were developed with the Steering Committee and the data was collected in 2016. 4094 households were included in the survey. The analysis of the data never resulted in a published report.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Arsaal, was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). VASyR Arsaal is an addition to the 2019 VASyR, containing a representative sample of Syrian Refugee households in Arsaal.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 09, 2017-May 24, 2017
    The 2017 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses the situation of a representative sample of registered Syrian refugee households to identify situational changes and trends. With over one million registered refugees within its borders, Lebanon hosts the second-largest population of Syrian refugees in the region, and the highest per capita population of refugees in the world. Since the first assessment, the VASyR has been an essential tool for partnership and for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. A total of 4966 households were interviewed. The contents of this report, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrate that economic vulnerability has worsened, with more than half of refugees living in extreme poverty, and that food insecurity rates are stable, but remain high.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 23, 2016-June 04, 2017
    The 2016 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) surveyed a representative sample of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their situation. The assessment to provided valuable insight into refugees living conditions, from the size of their families to the shelter they live in, to their economic vulnerability and food insecurity. Throughout this report, refugees own viewpoints offer a crucial glimpse into the strategies they deploy to survive and their own perceptions of their situation and the assistance they receive. A total of 4596 households were surveyed. Since its inception, the VASyR has been an essential process and partnership for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. As in previous years, humanitarian agencies have incorporated VASyR findings into their programming and recommendations. The assessment, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrates that economic vulnerability is, at best, as serious as previous year. Over one third of refugees are moderately to severely food insecure, an increase compared to 2015. Families have exhausted their limited resources, and are having to adapt to survive on the bare minimum. Refugees continue to rely on harmful coping mechanisms to get by.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • The Government of Sudan and the international community are working together to jointly support durable solutions for Darfurs internally displaced people. The commitment is rooted in the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) from 2011, signed by the Government of Sudan, other major parties to the conflict and the international community, and which sets out the framework for peace in Darfur. The peace agreement and the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS) that followed constitute political commitments to support durable peace and development in Darfur. This pledge has resulted in piloting a durable solutions process in El Fasher in North Darfur. To reach durable solutions and end displacement, long-term planning based on agreed and jointly-owned comprehensive data is needed. To establish an agreed evidence base, a collaborative profiling approach was adopted that brought actors together to ensure trust and ownership of the results of the profiling exercise. An important aspect of this durable solutions profiling is that it places IDPs centre-stage alongside the two other major stakeholdersthe Government of Sudan and the international communitypermitting the profiling results and recommendations to be owned and signed off by all parties. The durable solutions profiling exercise in El Fasher makes up step two: getting better informed about the displacement affected communities in the five-stage durable solutions process. The survey included 3002 households. It specifically aims to: provide a comprehensive profile of IDPs residing in Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps; develop a better understanding of IDPs vulnerabilities, coping mechanisms, capacities and provide insight into IDPs perceptions and their future settlement intentions; provide a jointly agreed upon data set to help inform durable solutions programming responses; pilot a profiling exercise of displacement and joint durable solutions planning that could be replicated in other Sudan contexts with displaced populations.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 22, 2018-January 17, 2019
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 470,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites, and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey was designed to address these shortcomings and support the settlement's development framework, as well as the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data were collected in November 2018 to January 2019, covering about 6004 households.
    This dataset updates: Never