• Updated 8 September 2021 | Dataset date: June 14, 2021-July 31, 2021
    A total of 8871 household surveys were completed across 45 baladiyas (ADM3) in Libya. Due to ongoing COVID-19 restrictions and safety measures, all surveys took place over the phone. A non-probability, quota based sampling methodology was established, to ensure an accurate and robust cross-section of the Libyan population. Quotas were established for baladiyas (quota 1) and sub-groups within the population (non-displaced, IDPs, and returnees) (quota 2). Findings presented are not representative, and should be read only as indicative. Sampling of respondents was done primarily through Civil Society Organisation (CSO) networks, municipalities, International Non-Government Organisation (INGO) partners, and various local committees. 1000 of the total number of surveys were sampled through Random Digit Dialing (RDD) by a Libyan company specialized in this methodology. Additional sampling and data collection was done by international and national NGO partners and UN programmes. Quantitative data collection took place between 14 June and 31 July.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 September 2021 | Dataset date: September 02, 2020-September 24, 2021
    The Syrian IDP camps monitoring interactive study is issued by the IMU of the ACU on a monthly basis, to monitor the humanitarian situation of 231 IDp camps in Idleb and Aleppo governorates in Syria’s northwest, shedding light on the needs of the IDPs and the services provided in the camps in the following sectors: Population statistics, WASH, Health, Education, FSL, Shelter and NFI, in addition to the priority needs of IDPs. The study also includes statistics of those who arrive at and leave the camps and the important incidents which took place during the month of the data collection.
    4700+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every month
  • Updated 5 September 2021 | Dataset date: July 14, 2020-September 23, 2020
    The eighth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between July 14 and September 23, 2020, a total of 9,634 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 61 districts in Iraq (including 40 formal camps).
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 5 September 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2021-August 16, 2021
    The ninth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG) and partners for data collection, seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between June 09 and August 16, 2021, a total of 11645 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 64 districts in Iraq (including 27 formal camps). with thanks to Action Against Hunger, Al Khiamiat for Agricultural Development and Guidance, Ankawa Humanitarian Committee, Arbeiter-Samariter-Bund Deutschland e.V. , Caritas, Human Imprint Organisation, Humanity & Inclusion, International Rescue Committee, International Organization for Migration, Iraq Health Access Organisation, Jesuit Refugee Service, Kurdistan Save the Children, Mercy Corps, Mission East, Norwegian Refugee Council, Pekawa Organisation, Save the Children, Terre des Hommes, World Vision, and Youth Save Organisation for supporting REACH in household data collection.
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 16 August 2021 | Dataset date: June 14, 2021-July 31, 2021
    A total of 1,554 individual surveys were completed (post-data cleaning) across 11 Libyan Mantikas, namely Tripoli, Misrata, Azzawya, Al Jabal Al Gharbi, Aljfara, and Zwara in the West; Benghazi, Ejdabia and Alkufra in the East; Sebha and Murzuq in the South. A quota based non-probability sampling method was chosen for this assessment, covering only shortlisted locations where migrants and refugees are known to be based. This is because: i) migrants and refugees are difficult to locate in Libya; ii) data on the numbers and location of migrants and refugees are indicative only (thus preventing national-level stratification); and iii) migrants and refugees are not evenly dispersed throughout the Libyan territory but rather known to be clustered in certain (usually urban) areas. Quotas were designed to reflect a grouping of migrants and refugees from the following regions: West and Central Africa, East Africa, Middle East and North Africa, South and East Asia. An overall quota of 10% was set for female respondents, reflecting the estimated gender distribution of the refugee and migrant population, according to IOM-DTM. Given the sampling strategy, results are indicative and aggregation is only recommended at the national or regional level for both the total population and the region-of-origin sub_groups, or mantika level for the total population only. Aggregation by gender is only recommended at the national level. Due to the precarious health situation following the COVID-19 outbreak, surveys have been conducted over the phone as a precautionary measure. Phone numbers were sourced from a combination of CSO contact lists, UNHCR contact lists and INGO databases. This MSNA was conducted at the individual level, in contrast to the 2021 Libyan MSNA. For the purposes of this MSNA, the individual level unit of measurement was deemed more indicative as it has been recorded that the proportion of migrants and refugees travelling and living alone in Libya is much higher than those living in traditional households, therefore limiting the applicability of household level analysis in this context. However, the 2021 MSNA encompasses a separate component (forthcoming), aiming to gather information on education and child protection within the target population groups, by means of a household-level survey.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 16 August 2021 | Dataset date: May 05, 2019-June 30, 2021
    The dataset contains IDPs at site level.
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    This dataset updates: As needed
  • At the end of 2015, Herat Province was among the highest IDP hosting provinces in Afghanistan, accounting for approximately 10% of the country's IDP population. In order to obtain reliable information on the socio-economic conditions of IDPs and returnees in Herat Province, a comprehensive sample survey was carried out among 11,264 households in the 5 most populated IDP/returnee settlements (Shagofan, Jebraiel, Maslakh, Now Abad and Kahdistan) in 2017.
    10+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 11 July 2021 | Dataset date: September 22, 2020-September 28, 2020
    This Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) was initiated by UNHCR’s Sub-Office in Cox’s Bazar to monitor its distribution of cash to refugees as part of a pilot cash programme, as well as to collect the feedback of refugees on the cash distribution itself. It was designed with built-in COVID-19 prevention measures. UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 11 July 2021 | Dataset date: September 24, 2020-November 30, 2020
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. For this assessment, 1791 women recepients of menstrual hygiene management kits were interviewed, 1607 of whom answered questions about sanitary pads and underwear. 215 men were interviewed, 182 of whom answered questions about sanitary pads and underwear. These responses were excluded from the analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • UNHCR Serbia CBI project provides targeted financial assistance to UNHCR's Population of concern (PoC) with monthly cash grants, with a view to address the most acute material needs of refugees and asylum seekers in private accommodation. The overall objective of the project is to ensure that PoC have sufficient basic and domestic items, through the delivery of monthly cash assistance meant to cover expenses helping them to settle and stabilize their life upon displacement. This assistance aims to support a longer-term self-reliance with a view to reduce vulnerability, including prevention of high-risk behaviour (survival sex, child labour…). Besides the regular monthly payments, the project covers for emergency needs as one-time cash payment. UNHCR provides CBI to the most vulnerable asylum seekers and refugees, through direct implementation. Current CBI SOPs were endorsed at the beginning of 2019. The CBI Committee, consisting of representatives of Durable Solutions, Protection and Programme Units decides on allocation, extension or withdrawal of cash assistance to each beneficiary. CBI is meant to help PoCs address their basic needs, including alternatives to camps. The SCRM provides rental subsidy to persons granted international protection, during the first year upon recognition of their status. After that period, and if there are gaps in allocation, UNHCR provides CBI. As opposed to SCRM, UNHCR can also provide CBI to asylum seekers in private accommodation. In July, UNHCR 47 HH/89 persons received CBI. Half of these households started receiving CBI due to loss of jobs during the COVID-19 crisis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Located in rural northern Uganda, Rhino Camp is home to more than 80,000 refugees3 – mostly South Sudanese who fled since July 2016. Other Rhino Camp residents come from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sudan, as well as the host Ugandan community. 74% of all heads of household are women,4 and Rhino Camp is one of a growing number of refugee settlements across nine UNHCR operations where solar street lamps are in use. Between April and June 2015 UNHCR installed some three dozen community lights in 50% of Rhino Camp’s 14 villages. As demand for community lighting far exceeded available funds, UNHCR worked with the refugee community and its partner the Danish Refugee Council to prioritize the strategic placement of lights within villages. The partners jointly selected locations where (1) refugees were prone to nighttime violence, theft or other safety risks, and (2) lights would promote constructive night-time activity. Using a 72-question survey, researchers asked respondents what day- and night-time6 activities they and their children do, and whether they do these activities in lit or unlit locations. Researchers then asked respondents if they feared or had been victims of something bad while doing these activities. The phrase something bad is the English translation for the most commonly used expressions – in Nuer, Dinka, Bari, and Kiswahili – of being a victim of an aggressive act or encountering danger. Survey responses reveal that the bad experiences that respondents most commonly fear are sexual and physical violence, theft, verbal harassment, injury, and encounters with animals
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest’s demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2020-November 30, 2020
    To allow for a proper understanding of the extent of the impact of COVID-19 on refugees in Uganda, the need was identified to carry out a Rapid Gender Assessment (RGA) to assess the impact of the pandemic on women, men, girls and boys of diverse backgrounds, including persons with disabilities, older persons and those with serious medical conditions. This assessment was conducted both in Kampala and across refugee settlements. A mixed methods approach was used to address the central objectives of the study, including a review of secondary sources, a household survey and a key informants interview. The household survey targeted 1535 individuals, including vulnerable groups such as child heads of household, persons living with disabilities, and persons with serious medical conditions. The final locations included within the sample were Kampala, Kyaka II, Nakivale, Oruchinga, Adjumani, Bidibidi, Imvepi, Kiryandongo, Lobule and Rhino Camp. Those locations were selected to ensure that all regions and population groups were represented in the final sample of respondents.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Sri Lanka from March, to April, 2021. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Pakistan in November, 2020. UNCHR Pakistan has always been at the front line of dealing with the Afghan refugee crisis. In the wake of Covid-19 pandemic and its far lasting financial impacts, UNHCR Pakistan has rolled out an Emergency Cash Assistance Program to help refugees meet their basic needs and to mitigate harsh socio-economic impacts in the time of crises and countrywide lockdowns. UNHCR implemented a one-off emergency cash assistance to vulnerable refugee and asylum seeker families to help meet their basic needs including food, rent, and access to essential supplies and services. This large-scale cash distribution required an independent third-party post distribution monitoring (PDM) to confirm whether the beneficiaries have received their entitled cash payment and also to clarify the mode of utilization of cash, whether it has been shared, spent, or saved. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: November 24, 2020-February 09, 2021
    THE CBI Covid PDM Household Survey was conducted in Nepal from November, 2020 to February, 2021. In Nepal, UNHCR has supported the Covid-19 response in multiple sectors in 2020, such as Cash-Based Interventions. One of the main findings of the survey was that almost a third of the households answered that they were currently not able to meet basic needs of the households, even though alll of them had benefitted from interventions earlier. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Malaysia between December, to January, 2021. In Malaysia, refugees live in a very challenging environment with limited rights to health, education and work. As the Malaysian government does not provide refugees with any monetary support, refugees depend on low-income work to provide for their families and for themselves. As there are approximately 150,000 refugees in Malaysia, the CBI program is targeted to the most vulnerable groups, with a household income below the national poverty line, women and girls at risk, children and adolescents at risk and persons with serious medical conditions. Assistance to refugees who have been detained and have not managed to earn sufficient funds during their sentence is also provided. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • The assistance dataset includes the assistance history of the households that have taken the 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) assessment. The dataset is extracted from Refugees Assistance Information System (RAIS) which is an online Inter-Agency web application used by Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (LCRP) partners in Lebanon for tracking and reporting assistance provided to persons of concern to UNHCR.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • The socio-economic desk score dataset includes the socio-economic scores of the households that have taken the 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) assessment. The desk score is a Proxy Means Test (PMT) score, available for all population, that predicts the economic vulnerability of households. The dataset includes the desk scores of the case numbers since 2016. In Lebanon, the desk score is revised annually and used by Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (LCRP) cash actors for the identification and selection of beneficiaries for multi-purpose cash assistance.
    This dataset updates: Never