• This report presents the findings of the profiling activities conducted from June to August 2018 in communities hosting internally displaced persons (IDPs) of the Marawi conflict and return communities in the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon. Data was collected through structured interviews with IDP households using the kobo™ tool. Primary respondents were heads of households and in their absence, any person of legal age in the family. A total of 34,785 heads of households were interviewed in the profiling activity, representing 97,126 IDPs in 56 municipalities and 3 cities. This report presents data on demographic makeup of the IDPs such as age, sex, number of households, and family size, as well as protection information relating to displacement location, place of origin, resettlement, integration; various vulnerabilities of persons with special needs; educational attainment; income livelihood and skills; access to assistance; access to information; civil documentation; property ownership; intent to return; access to information, assistance received, and sources of assistance. Special focus is given on children and women in separate sections of this report. A significant number of IDPs continue to experience gaps in assistance related to health, education, shelter and long-term livelihood support. Also, IDPs continue to experience protection risks due to lack of civil documentation due to loss or destruction of birth certificates. A more nuanced and targeted approach that will address specific protection needs of IDPs is needed.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 01, 2019-November 21, 2019
    A Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) survey was conducted in Ajuong Thok and Pamir Refugee Camps in October 2019 to determine the current Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) conditions as well as hygiene attitudes and practices within the households (HHs) surveyed. The assessment utilized a systematic random sampling method, and a total of 1,474 HHs (735 HHs in Ajuong Thok and 739 HHs in Pamir) were surveyed using mobile data collection (MDC) within a period of 21 days. Data was cleaned and analyzed in Excel. The summary of the results is presented in this report. The findings show that the overall average number of liters of water per person per day was 23.4, in both Ajuong Thok and Pamir Camps, which was slightly higher than the recommended United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) minimum standard of at least 20 liters of water available per person per day. This is a slight improvement from the 21 liters reported the previous year. The average HH size was six people. Women comprised 83% of the surveyed respondents and males 17%. Almost all the respondents were refugees, constituting 99.5% (n=1,466). The refugees were aware of the key health and hygiene practices, possibly as a result of routine health and hygiene messages delivered to them by Samaritan´s Purse (SP) and other health partners. Most refugees had knowledge about keeping the water containers clean, washing hands during critical times, safe excreta disposal and disease prevention.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • This sampling survey was designed to rapidly measure the protection and socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on the refugee population in Mbera camp the region of Hodh Echargui in Mauritania. The result shows that the socio-economic situation of all households across all vulnerability categories has degraded due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The top four fears of refugees are related to food shortages, price increases, disruption of basic service facilities and travel restrictions.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 25, 2019-December 04, 2019
    Maratane Refugee Camp is found in Northern Mozambique, Nampula Province, and is located around 35 kms from the capital city Nampula. The camp was established in February 2001, and since 2003, it has become the only reception center and official settlement in Mozambique, where asylum seekers and refugees can be registered and assisted. Currently, Maratane Refugee camp hosts approximately 9,242 refugees, which are mainly from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia and other nationalities. Maratane Camp is the only refugee camp in the country and is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). INAR is UNHCR's main government counterpart, and operates under the jurisdiction of the Ministry for Internal Affairs. INAR is divided into several units, including Protection/RSD, program, Registration and Logistics and is also UNHCR WASH partner for providing WASH service in the camp. In order to understand the current status and level of WASH service in the camp, UNHCR had conducted a WASH KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices) survey through coordination with INAR. Accordingly, a total of 433 households from different zones of the camp were interviewed using UNHCR's standard WASH KAP survey questionnaire which was pre-tested and adapted to local context.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000.1 The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average.2 As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessments (J-MSNA) was conducted in the host community to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi-sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
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    This dataset updates: Never
  • Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000. The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average. As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee communities to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
    50+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Data set covering the third round of the GIFMM joint multi-sector needs assessment, implemented in July 2020, with an objective to measure the living conditions of Venezuelan refugee and migrant households in Colombia, to inform the 2021 Refugee and Migrant Response Plan. 34 organizations undertook more than 3,100 phone interviews with households. The final report can be found here (in English) https://data2.unhcr.org/es/documents/details/79281 and here (in Spanish) https://r4v.info/es/documents/details/79280
    60+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Following an outbreak of violence on 25 August 2017 in Rakhine State, Myanmar, a new massive influx of Rohingya refugees to Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh started in late August 2017. Most of the Rohingya refugees settled in Ukhia and Teknaf Upazilas of Cox’s Bazar, a district bordering Myanmar identified as the main entry area for border crossings. The two datasets present the result of the NPM Round 16 Site Assessment exercise, which collected information related to the Rohingya refugee population distribution and multisectoral needs from female key informants and majhee key informants during the months of 21st August – 10th October. Rohingya refugee population distribution by para in Teknaf upazila. Please click here
    1700+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every three months
  • Updated 26 October 2020 | Dataset date: August 01, 2020-August 01, 2020
    The dataset contains roads accessible by vehicles and trucks across the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar Bangladesh, smaller routes and footpaths are not included, satellite imageries and ground verification was used in order to collect and consolidate this dataset. Source: Logistics Sector Contributor: WFP Date: August 2020 Expected Update Frequency: 2 times per year + as needed
    200+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • Updated 11 September 2020 | Dataset date: February 01, 2020-March 31, 2020
    The dataset has IDPs households and individuals with age and gender disaggregated data at sub national level. A site assessment is a sub-component of mobility tracking. It aims to collect data on population presence, living conditions and needs in a particular displacement site or community.
    700+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every year
  • The dataset contains number of displaced persons by gender and age dis-aggregated. Dataset contains data on Covid-19, WASH, Shelter and other needs.
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    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • The dataset contains number of IDPs, families and their needs at sub national level with site coordinates.
    500+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 25 March 2020 | Dataset date: February 02, 2017-March 03, 2017
    Community level assessment data for 130 communities in Côte d'Ivoire, covering information about demographics, basic infrastructure, livelihoods, women's empowerment, child protection and education.
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    This dataset updates: As needed
  • In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic, ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have fled into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season, and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a comprehensive Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted among the host community to support humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the 2019 Rohingya Crisis MSNA Strategy, with the specific objectives of (1) Providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi-sectoral needs for the 2020 Joint Response Plan; and (2) Providing the basis for a joint multi-stakeholder analysis process. The full terms of reference for the assessment can be found here: https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/sites/www.humanitarianresponse.info/files/2019/07/Rohingya-Crisis-Bangladesh-Joint-MSNA----In-Depth-Assessment-Concept-Note-%28July-2019%29.pdf. The J-MSNA was implemented and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group and comprised of the following members: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
    800+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 6 January 2020 | Dataset date: December 25, 2019-December 27, 2019
    Findings presented in this data set are based on data collected by REACH as part of a rapid camps and sites assessment to provide insight on: How many new IDP arrivals are arriving to camps, informal settlements, collective centres, or transit reception centres reported at the site level since Dec. 18th Movement intentions of the new IDP arrivals in the coming two weeks Identify priority needed items by sector of the new IDP arrivals. Data was collected in 150 communities across eight sub-districts in Northern Idleb and Western Aleppo from 25 to 27 December 2019 through REACH enumerators who surveyed one Key Informant (KI) per community on internally displaced persons' (IDPs) camps and sites nearest to their community. In order to qualify as camp or site, a site had to have 5 or more IDP households living on its premises. 1,253 camps and sites were assessed across 150 communities. IDP numbers solely represent newly arrived IDPs (5 or more HH) to planned camps, informal settlements, collective centres, and transit reception centres, and do not account for total camp or site IDP populations or IDPs within the host communities. The definition of IDPs used by enumerators for this assessment was ‘Individuals or groups of people who have been forced to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as a result of or in order to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalised violence, violations of human rights, or natural or man-made disasters, and who have not crossed an international border'. The definition of planned camp was 'A planned camp is a place where IPDs find accomodation on purpose-built sites, where service infrastructure is provided and distribution take place. The camp is established by an accountable humanitarian actor and to the extent possible, meet the minimum SPHERE standards'. The definition of informal settlements was 'Otherwise known as a self-settled camp or a spontaneous site, hosting 5 or more IDP households. IDPs may settle in a camp that is independent of assistance from the government or humanitarian community. They are a group of tented, or other types of housing units, or unfinished buildings established by IDPs themselves or by non-experienced actors, often erected on land that the occupants have no legal claim to. IDPs intend to stay in this location for an extended period of time. At the moment, most of the so-called IDP camps in Syria fall under this category. ' The definition of collective centres was 'A pre-existing building or other structure used to host 5 or more IDP households, e.g. public buildings, schools, mosques, private collective building' The definition of transit reception centres was 'Otherwise known as transit camps, they provide temporary accomodation for displaced persons pending transfer to a suitable, safe, longer term camp, or at the end of an operation as a staging point of return. Reception/transit centres are usually either intermediate or short-term installations. These sites are often established during extremely large displacements.' Information should be considered as reflective of the situation at the time of data collection, given the dynamic situation in the region. In addition, information should be considered as indicative, and not representative, of the situation.
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    This dataset updates: As needed
  • The assessment contains IDPs and Returnees data at village level. The data is gender and age disaggregated and also has number of vulnerable population and the needs assessment.
    200+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • NPM Bangladesh has produced a number of tools based on its regular data collection activities. The package of November 2019 is based on NPM Site Assessment 16 (during the months of 21st August – 10th October) and NPM most updated drone imagery (as of 23 January 2019). Here below, the complete package by camp: SW Map package KMZ file Drone image The full image and shapefiles are available at this link.
    3400+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every three months
  • Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: June 11, 2018-June 11, 2018
    Rapid needs assessment conducted across 255 communities in Idleb Governorate and surrounding opposition held areas in north western Hama, and western Aleppo. Dataset includes demographics, IDP movement intentions, and sectoral information for shelter, food security, livelihoods, electricity and NFIs, WASH, Health, Education, and Protection. Data was collected from May 24th to the 31st.
    200+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every three months
  • Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 01, 2018-September 26, 2018
    The overall objective of the Hard to Reach component of the Whole of Afghanistan Assessment was to supplement of the household data collection with an understanding of the multi-sectoral needs faced by those in Hard to Reach areas. This data ought to inform humanitarian programming in these districts and support the identification of nationwide inter-sectoral needs and how they inter-relate across different geographic locations and population groups outlined in the Humaniarian Needs Overview (HNO). The Hard to Reach component of the Whole of Afghanistan (WoA) Assessment utilised Mapping Focus Group Discussions for the mapping process and Key Informant Interviews with knowledgeable community members to identify needs and access constraints. This data complemented the household-level data collection component of the Whole of Afghanistan. The presented dataset here includes the key informant responses across the 70 Hard to Reach districts, conducted to capture inter-sectoral needs of displaced and host households in these areas of Afghanistan.
    400+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: February 26, 2019-February 26, 2019
    Since the end of January 2019, southern Idleb and northern Hama governorates have seen a significant escalation of conflict. Shelling and airstrikes intensified in the area, leading to a deterioration of the humanitarian situation. In response, REACH conducted a rapid needs assessment to provide actors with an update on the humanitarian situation. The latest conflict escalation affects an area that is home to an estimated 700,000 residents and internally displaced persons (IDPs), increasing vulnerability, and in some cases, leading to secondary and tertiary displacements. From late 2017, the region has witnessed a large-scale influx of IDPs, following escalations of conflict and displacements from formerly opposition-held areas in south-east Idleb, south-west Aleppo, Rural Damascus, Homs, Hama, Dar’a and Quneitra governorates. The increase in IDP population in Idleb governorate and surrounding areas has led to a growing strain on resources and an increase in inter-communal tensions in the region. Further complicating the situation, there has been increasing concern regarding a potential military offensive in the region since September 2018, with shelling and airstrikes occurring with increased frequency. While the mid-September 2018 announcement of a demilitarised zone put a pause on concerns over an imminent military offensive in the region, clashes have continued unabated. Data for this assessment was collected from 25-26 February 2019 in 85 opposition-controlled communities in 12 sub-districts via community-level key informant (KI) interviews. KIs were asked to report on the previous week (18 to 25 February). This dataset provides the findings for indicators on demographics, shelter, food, livelihoods, electricity & NFIs, WASH, health, education, protection, reported priority needs, and reported movement intentions.
    300+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: June 30, 2016-June 30, 2016
    In June 2016, a third round of the MSNA updates was initiated by REACH, supported by ECHO, following the February 2016 update to the MSNA baseline. This assessment draws on community level data, collected from “People with Knowledge” (PwK). Findings indicate that the situation of some population groups remains challenging, with prevalent threats to personal safety and security reported in certain locations in addition to unaffordable basic needs, weakened WASH infrastructure, and restricted access to livelihoods and liquidity in some areas.
    800+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 8 November 2019 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-January 01, 2019
    The file contains overall severity of needs analysis by woreda (admin level3) for 2019 HNO. It has severity of needs as of January 2019 and revised severity as of July 2019.
    100+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every year
  • The dataset contains number of people displaced and returnees at village level in Kasai Oriental province. The dataset also contains needs of the displaced and returned people, reason and time of displacement.
    300+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed