• Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: August 17, 2021-September 17, 2021
    Between August and September 2021, UNHCR and WFP undertook an assessment of refugees from the Central African Republic in North and South Ubangui provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The main objective of the of the assessment of needs and livelihoods is to understand the basic needs and vulnerabilities, particularly related to livelihoods, of refugees. The assessment was a joint effort between the UNHCR and WFP country offices and the UNHCR-WFP Joint Targetting Hub. Data collection took place from August 17 to September 17, 2021 in the four refugee camps of Bili and Inke (North Ubangi) and Boyabu and Mole (South Ubangi). 1,450 households were selected using stratified random sampling, with 1,328 were retained. See more details in the report. This dataset represents an anonymous version of the original dataset.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: February 14, 2021-March 19, 2021
    Between February and March 2021, UNHCR and WFP undertook an assessment of refugees from South Sudan in the sites of Biringi (Ituri province), Bele and Meri (Haut Uélé province) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The objective of the assessment was to update the basic knowledge on the humanitarian needs of the whole South Sudanese refugee population in these sites to inform programmatic decisions and assess the relevance of a harmonized humanitarian targetting strategy based on level of vulnerability. The assessment was carried out jointly by UNHCR and WFP. All refugee households in all sites were interviewed, consisting of 8,630 households. This dataset represents an anonymous version of the original dataset. A 20% random sample of the original dataset was drawn as part of the anonymization. The sample was stratified by site (Mele, Beri and Biringi). The variable survey_weight provide the final weights.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-January 31, 2021
    In January 2021, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme (WFP) undertook an assessment of refugees from Burundi in the Lusenda and Mulongwe refugee camps in South Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The objective of the assessment was to assess the relevance of UNHCR and WFP's targeting in the context of Burundian refugees and possibly develop a targeting strategy harmonized as much as possible with other refugee populations in DRC. A secondary objective was to introduce barcodes linked to unique identifiers used in registration. This vulnerability assessment was conducted through an exhaustive inventory of all refugee households living in the Lusenda and Mulongwe camps (South Kivu) as well as those living outside the camps and who went to the interview locations in the camps. The survey targeted Burundian refugee households assisted by WFP and UNHCR. The data collected during the survey are quantitative and were supplemented by qualitative data collected in February 2021 in the camps of Lusenda and Mulongwe through four focus group discussions per camp for a total of eight focus groups. All refugee households in Lusenda and Mulongwe camps as well as those living outside the camp, were interviewed with a core set of questions (see variable TypeEnquete, response Ciblage). In addition, 7% of households, randomly selected, participated in a more detailed interview (see variable TypeEnquete, response Exhaustive). A total of 7,873 households were selected. This dataset represents an anonymous version of the original dataset. A sample of the original dataset was drawn as part of the anonymization. The sample was stratified by camp (Lusenda or Muolongwe) and the type of survey (Ciblage or Exhaustive). All respondents that were part of the Exhaustive survey were preserved, while a random sample of the respondents that were part of the Ciblage survey was taken. The variable strata defines which records correspond with which group, and survey_weight provide the final weights.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: October 03, 2021-October 17, 2021
    In October 2021, UNHCR and WFP undertook an assessment of refugees from the Central African Republic living with host families in Zongo (South Ubangi) and Yakoma (North Ubangi) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The main objective of the of the assessment was to refine a targeting strategy that identifies the most vulnerable and supports them through assistance tailored to their needs and priorities, with a view to facilitating and achieving self-reliance. The assessment was a joint effort between the UNHCR and WFP country offices and the UNHCR-WFP Joint Hub. Data collection took place from 3 to 17 October, 2021, in four settlements. 770 households were selected using systematic random sampling. See more details in the report. This dataset represents an anonymous version of the original dataset.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    Following the change in authority in Afghanistan on 15 August 2021, UNHCR introduced a rapid assessment methodology to quickly assess humanitarian and protection needs throughout the country as part of scale-up by UNHCR to respond to the unfolding crisis. The assessments were carried out between October - December 2021. The primary focus of the assessments were IDPs and IDP returnees who account for the majority of the households interviewed in these assessments. Nonetheless, as UNHCR takes a whole-of-community approach in its assistance programme, vulnerable host community members were also assessed, alongside a small number of refugee returnees, asylum seekers and refugees, as well as deported and spontaneous returnees under an area-based approach. The majority of the assessments were conducted in the Southern Region due to the fact that conflict increased over JuneJuly 2021 in the South and people were displaced into urban areas and could not be reached. When the fighting subsided following the change in authority on 15 August 2021, many families immediately returned to their places of origin. As their needs were assumed to be high, they were prioritized for assessment.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: March 01, 2022-April 30, 2022
    This data was collected as part of a post-distribution monitoring (PDM) exercise that had the aim of evaluating the key outcomes of the “Emergency And Protection Cash Assistance For Vulnerable Afghans In Pakistan” project. As part of the project, UNHCR provided 30,000 PKR emergency cash assistance to households with specific vulnerabilities with the aim of mitigating protection incidents / situations. Ninety four households across the country were provided with the one-off cash assistance. The PDM survey was conducted between March and April 2022 simultaneously across offices in Peshawar, Quetta and Islamabad. All interviews were done by telephone interview. Given the limited number of the total recipients of the cash assistance, the PDM attempted a full enumeration, however, only reached 62 recipients (65% response rate).
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 14 November 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2021-July 01, 2022
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees’ feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses cash based interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to Persons of Concern (PoCs) in line with UNHCR’s core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample of refugee recipients residing across the country. This study monitors the following type of Cash Assitance: Basic Needs (MPCA), Education, Energy, cash for persons with specific needs, cash for protection and covid-19, rent, shelter repair, voluntary return and winterization.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 November 2022 | Dataset date: September 19, 2020-September 28, 2020
    Against the recent COVID-19 pandemic and its secondary socio-economic impact, the objective of theJoint Needs Assessment (JNA) was to provide an update on the level of vulnerability and livelihoodresilience among refugee households in Mantapala settlement. Livelihood challenges and opportunities had to be identified and socio-economic profiles developed for those most vulnerable and affected bythe pandemic. Lastly, the JNA was to inform programmatic decisions and suggest the most appropriate and feasible targeting approach for future interventions by WFP and UNHCR. An extensive literature review and technical discussions took place to identify the knowledge gap during the assessment design phase. The data collection for the assessment took place in Mantapala settlement between the 19 - 28 September 2020. A total of 1,128 randomly selected households were interviewed based on a structured questionnaire. Additionally, five focus group discussions and two key informant interviews were conducted. Findings are statistically representative at the settlement level. This dataset is an anonymous version of the household data collected through the structured questionnaire. It was processed by UNHCR and WFP. Data users should be aware that the data includesa number of households that are composed of only minors (under the age of 18). This is a known vulnerability in the settlement, and not an error in the dataset.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 November 2022 | Dataset date: July 18, 2022-August 10, 2022
    Starting in February 2022, an increasing number of refugees and third-country nationals (TCNs) entering Slovakia was registered as a result of the war in Ukraine. As of 25 May 2022, Slovak authorities reported over 450,000 arrivals from Ukraine out of whom close to 420,000 were Ukrainian refugees and close to 14,000 TCNs. Data collected by REACH between March and June 2022 also indicated that 38% of respondents crossing the border into Slovakia considered it as their final destination and that 65% of those intended to stay in the country as long as the conflict in Ukraine continued. To respond to their needs, collective centers (CCs) were to host the refugees. While these centers play a key role in the humanitarian response, the overwhelming majority of refugees reside in the host community; however, little to no information is currently available (May 2022) to response actors regarding their demographic profile, household composition, geographical presence, vulnerabilities, humanitarian needs, movement intentions, or coping capacities. In this context, REACH with the support of UNHCR undertook a multi-sector needs assessment (MSNA) light with the global objective of supporting an evidence-based humanitarian response in Slovakia through the provision of multi-sectoral data about the needs and coping capacities of Ukrainian refugee households in the country. Data collection took place between 18 July and 12 August2022. This dataset is the anonymous version of the original dataset. Note that the variable nationality was removed from the dataset to protect data subjects, however all but one respondent was of Ukrainian nationality.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 November 2022 | Dataset date: June 01, 2021-June 30, 2021
    The objectives of the UNHCR-WFP Joint Assessment Mission (JAM) 2021 were to: collect updated information on refugees’ and host communities’ capacities to meet their basic needs, their livelihood opportunities and challenges, and any related protection concerns, including the level of integration and social cohesion between the two groups; understand the current food security and nutrition situation of the refugees and host community; and describe the vulnerability characteristics of refugee households in the camp and those in the host community to inform programmatic decision-making. The survey was designed to generate statistically representative findings for the refugee population residing in Maratane settlement and the Mozambican host community living east of the river Ruvuma within a 6 km radius from the centre of the settlement. In addition to the household survey, 16 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 7 key informant interviews were conducted both in-settlement refugees and the host community. Data collection of household survey took place between 20th August and 11th September, and FGDs and key informant interviews between 20th September and 15th October 2021. The sample frame of the refugee household survey for Maratane settlement was UNHCR’s proGres database and was verified by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). The sample was drawn each in Maratane settlement and the host community at the 95 per cent of confidence level and 5 per cent considering non-response rates. In the settlement, the sample was stratified by sex of household heads. In total, 951 households completed interviews, 579 in the settlements and 372 in the host community. This dataset is an anonymous version of the original data collected and processed by UNHCR and WFP.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 November 2022 | Dataset date: April 12, 2022-June 10, 2022
    The UNHCR Results Monitoring Survey (RMS) is a household-level survey on persons of concern (PoC) to UNHCR directly or indirectly assisted by UNHCR, including refugees and asylum seekers, internally displaced persons, returnees, stateless and others of concern. The objective of the survey is to monitor impact and outcome level indicators on education, healthcare, livelihoods, protection concerns, shelter, and water and sanitation. The results contribute to an evidence base for reporting against UNHCR’s multi-year strategies to key stakeholders. The RMS can be implemented in any operational context. A standard structured questionnaire has been developed for the RMS, which can be conducted as a stand-alone survey or flexibly integrated with other data collection exercises. The data includes indicators collected at both the household and individual (household-member) level, and results are statistically representative. This RMS took place in South Africa between April and June 2022. The population of interest included all PoCs to UNHCR in South Africa, and the sample frame was taken from UNHCR's registration datasase (ProGres). Data subjects were intereviewed over the phone. This dataset is the anonymous version of the original data.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 21 October 2022 | Dataset date: May 30, 2022-July 07, 2022
    The 2022 Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), conducted by the REACH Initiative in close collaboration with the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), aims to understand the multi-sectoral and sector-specific needs, circumstances, and vulnerabilities of households across the entirety of the oPt. The 2022 MSNA was conducted through a statistically representative household survey across the entirety of the oPt. In consultation with key humanitarian partners and actors, a joint set of indicators, questions, and answer choices were developed for the assessment of needs in the Palestinian context. All surveys were conducted through face-to-face interviews, using the tablet-based Kobo Collect Open Data Kit (ODK) app where possible and paper surveys in other instances (primarily in East Jerusalem and households in Area C in close proximity to Israeli settlements or army bases) Household data collection took place from May 30 to July 06, 2022. Data collection activities were conducted by the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS). A total of 8,331 households were assessed across 57 geographic strata. These strata included all localities and refugee camps in the Gaza Strip, and all governorates in the West Bank with individual strata within each governorate by Oslo Area (Areas A & B combined, Area C separate), in addition to H2 and East Jerusalem. Data is statistically representative at a 95% confidence level and a +/- 9% margin of error for all strata with a buffer of 15%. At the national level and regional level (e.g., West Bank and Gaza Strip), findings will be statistically representative at a higher level.
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 9 October 2022 | Dataset date: November 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Uganda is home to over 1.5 million refugees, mostly from South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi. With over 4,000 GBV incidents in the first 10 months of 2021, prevention and response activities remain a priority for the operation. Over 1,500 survivors of gender-based violence (GBV) received cash assistance from UNHCR, to help the recovery from traumatic experiences and cover the basic needs of her family. This intervention is part of a broader programme financed by the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) in 2021 to strengthen GVB prevention and response in five refugee settlements in Uganda, namely Rhino Camp, Bidibidi, Adjumani, Palorinya and Kyangwali. Following an in-depth needs assessment, UNHCR provided the cash assistance via mobile money to over 1,500 women at risk and GBV survivors. Each woman received approximately US $46 a month for eight months, in addition to a cellular phone and financial literacy training. This data is the result of a household survey used to measure the results of the programme. Data was collected via telephone interviews using a structured individual-level questionnaire.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 9 October 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    While no segregated studies of the impact of COVID-19 on livelihoods on forcibly displaced people in Indonesia amongst UNHCR's persons of concern exist, UNHCR observed since May 2021 increasing case numbers amongst refugees and asylum seekers, especially as refugees are currently not included in the national vaccination scheme and are not able to receive COVID-19 treatment through the State's budget, though few local governments recently started vaccinating refugees as well. As of June 2021, there were 10,082 refugees and 3,334 asylum-seekers registered with UNHCR, of whom 7,490 are from Afghanistan (UNHCR 2021). The aim of the survey is to assess refugee's welfare, vulnerabilities, and coping strategies with regards to the socioeconomic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the impact of ongoing restrictions and the lockdown on refugees' socioeconomic status at a critical time of the pandemic in Indonesia. This has been conducted via a phone survey to test effectiveness and feasibility of using Interactive Voice Response (IVR) as an alternative data collection mode to CAPI and CATI interviews, in times where access to face- to- face data collection can become difficult. The pilot survey measures livelihoods and the socioeconomic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on forcibly displaced people in Indonesia. The survey will contribute to the understanding of the living conditions and the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on refugees and forcefully displaced persons.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 5 October 2022 | Dataset date: June 05, 2022-August 17, 2022
    In close coordination with the Assessment Information Management Working Group (AIM WG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), the tenth round of the Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) seeks to understand multi-sectoral household conditions and priority needs of conflict-affected populations living in Iraq. Between June 3rd and August 18th 2022, REACH Iraq and partners collected multi-sectoral household data on vulnerabilities across Iraq, reaching 13,000 households comprising 70,000 individuals, focusing on Returnee households, IDP households living in and out-of-camp, and host community households. This anonymized dataset contains household and individual-level data collected from these households. REACH Iraq is grateful for its partners for committing resources to ensure the completion of the 2022 MCNA in Iraq: Danish Refugee Council (DRC), Arbeiter-Samariter Bund (ASB), Cooperazione Internazionale (COOPI), CARE, Youth Save Organization, People in Need (PIN), INTERSOS. For any additional questions or information queries concerning MCNA X, please contact Ted Jaspers (theodore.jaspers@reach-initiative.org).
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 3 October 2022 | Dataset date: June 01, 2017-November 27, 2022
    This dashboard highlights the living situation in Syria by showing the prices of basic market items. How to use this product: The first three pages track price change chronologically on governorate level, with the ability to compare between them by choosing one or more. The subsequent pages show the prices of market items on the governorate and sub-district level with an item availability heat map of any selected item on any selected level and period. You can select one of the listed items in one sub-district or more. When you choose a governorate its subdistrict(s) will be highlighted according to the availability of the selected item in the selected governorate(s). This product is funded by the CDCS-MEAE. Disclaimer: The content, designations, and presentation of material in this report do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the ACU or contributory organizations/donors, nor does it imply any endorsement. Information is obtained from the ACU’s field network of enumerators by conducting Key Informant Interviews (KIIs) with sources believed to be reliable but are in no way guaranteed. No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are attempted.
    6400+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every month
  • Updated 2 October 2022 | Dataset date: June 05, 2022-August 17, 2022
    In close coordination with the Assessment Information Management Working Group (AIM WG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), the tenth round of the Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) seeks to understand multi-sectoral household conditions and priority needs of conflict-affected populations living in Iraq. Between June 3rd and August 18th 2022, REACH Iraq and partners collected multi-sectoral household data on vulnerabilities across Iraq, reaching 13,000 households and 70,000 individuals, focusing on Returnee households, IDP households living in and out-of-camp, and host community households. This data has been analyzed, and the 2022 Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA X) Preliminary Analysis and Summary Tables (with Arabic translation) is available for download. REACH Iraq is grateful for its partners for committing resources to ensure the completion of the 2022 MCNA in Iraq: Danish Refugee Council (DRC), Arbeiter-Samariter Bund (ASB), Cooperazione Internazionale (COOPI), CARE, Youth Save Organization, People in Need (PIN), INTERSOS. For any additional questions or information queries concerning MCNA X, please contact Ted Jaspers (theodore.jaspers@reach-initiative.org).
    20+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 27 September 2022 | Dataset date: April 01, 2020-November 27, 2022
    This dataset come from a special round of Twaweza’s Sauti za Wananchi mobile phone panel survey. The dataset was creating through random sampling from a database of contacts from previous surveys to establish a national representative panel of the country’s population. The data was collected from 3,000 respondents in the first round of the special Sauti za Wananchi panel, conducted in June 2020. The dataset contain information related to citizens’ knowledge, attitudes and practices on matters relating to CoVID-19.
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: July 05, 2021-October 09, 2021
    The Vulnerability Assessment Framework (VAF) is a key tool used by humanitarian and development organizations in Jordan. It contributes to coherent vulnerability identification and programme delivery across sectors. It was designed in 2014 with a focus on Syrian refugees residing outside of camps. For the fifth bi-annual VAF population study in 2022, 6,427 refugee households residing in host communities were randomly sampled across all governorates to explore thematic and sectoral vulnerabilities for refugee populations of all nationalities within Jordan. This data was collected in person between July 2021 and October 2021.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: October 07, 2021-December 19, 2021
    The Vulnerability Assessment Framework (VAF) is a key tool used by humanitarian and development organizations in Jordan. It contributes to coherent vulnerability identification and programme delivery across sectors. . It was designed in 2014 with a focus on Syrian refugees residing outside of camps. This dataset collected between November and December 2021 presents the first efforts in expanding the scopes to the Zaatari and Azraq refugee camps. Residents of both Azraq and Zaatari camps were randomly sampled to explore trends and vulnerabilities specific to the camp context. As the questionnaire was first used to collect the data in the urban setting, it was tailored for the refugee camps context to account for the camp residents’ living circumstances, allowing for a deeper understanding of this specific group. A total of 10,141 individuals, representing 2,208 families living in 1,620 households, were interviewed in person.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never