• Updated 5 October 2022 | Dataset date: June 05, 2022-August 17, 2022
    In close coordination with the Assessment Information Management Working Group (AIM WG), UN OCHA, and the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG), the tenth round of the Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) seeks to understand multi-sectoral household conditions and priority needs of conflict-affected populations living in Iraq. Between June 3rd and August 18th 2022, REACH Iraq and partners collected multi-sectoral household data on vulnerabilities across Iraq, reaching 13,000 households comprising 70,000 individuals, focusing on Returnee households, IDP households living in and out-of-camp, and host community households. This anonymized dataset contains household and individual-level data collected from these households. REACH Iraq is grateful for its partners for committing resources to ensure the completion of the 2022 MCNA in Iraq: Danish Refugee Council (DRC), Arbeiter-Samariter Bund (ASB), Cooperazione Internazionale (COOPI), CARE, Youth Save Organization, People in Need (PIN), INTERSOS. For any additional questions or information queries concerning MCNA X, please contact Ted Jaspers (theodore.jaspers@reach-initiative.org).
    This data is by request only
  • This is the 2022 multisector needs assessment (MSNA) data set - a comprehensive household-level analysis covering all 18 states in Sudan.
    This data is by request only
  • This is the 2022 multisector needs analysis data (MSNA) - a comprehensive household-level analysis covering all states in Sudan.
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    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Updated 8 September 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2022-December 31, 2022
    The data set contains the overall and sectors' people in need, people targeted and people reached by humanitarian assistance in Sudan during the period January-June 2022 broken down by admin 1 and admin 2 levels.
    30+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every three months
  • This survey is intended to generate an understanding of the communities' level of knowledge, attitudes and practices gained through WASH interventions in the camps and project performance indicators measurements.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • This survey is intended to generate an understanding of the communities' level of knowledge, attitudes and practices gained through WASH interventions in the camps and project performance indicators measurements. As of the survey period, Kigeme camp was accommodating 17,662 refugees living in 2,628 households structured into 7 quartiers having 22 villages.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • This survey is intended to generate an understanding of the communities' level of knowledge, attitudes and practices gained through WASH interventions in the camps and project performance indicators measurements. Kiziba refugee camp is located in Karongi district in the Western Province of Rwanda. The camp opened in December 1996 is hosting Congolese refugees and constituted by 10 quartiers, composed by 54 villages. The current population is 16,774 refugees.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • This survey is intended to generate an understanding of the communities' level of knowledge, attitudes and practices gained through WASH interventions in the camps and project performance indicators measurements. As of the survey period, Mugombwa camp was accommodating 10,940 refugees living in 2,268 households structured into 8 quartiers and 28 villages.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • This survey is intended to generate an understanding of the communities' level of knowledge, attitudes and practices gained through WASH interventions in the camps and project performance indicators measurements. As of the survey period, Nyabiheke camp was accommodating 14,484 refugees living in 2,662 households structured into 8 quartiers having 29 villages.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 07, 2021-November 19, 2021
    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugess (UNHCR) and World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a joint assessment mission (JAM) of Nigerian refugees in the Far North of Cameroon between October 7 and 19, 2021. The objective of the assessment was to collect updated information on basic needs, shelter, food security, nutrition, water and sanitation, education, protection, security, common services, and livelihoods of Nigerian refugees to inform improved humanitarian assistance. Assessment data was collected at three levels: household, children under five and women of child-bearing age. Stratified random sampling was used to collect the data, with two main strata: 1) Nigerian refugees in the Minawao camp and 2) Nigerian refugees outside of camps. The second strata was further divided into strata by department: Diamaré, Logone-et-Chari, Mayo-Sava, Mayo-Tsanaga. Raw survey weights were calculated by dividing the size of the sample frame by the sample size per strata. The published data on the MDL are an anonymous version of the original data.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 29 May 2022 | Dataset date: April 27, 2021-June 16, 2021
    For decades, Mauritania has maintained a generous open door policy towards Malians fleeing conflict. The most recent large-scale influx of Malians occurred in 2012, and resulted in the creation of the Mbera camp, which today hosts around 75,000 refugees. Because the large-scale return of Malians is not yet a viable option, Mauritania has committed itself to a policy of inclusion. It thus requested support from the UNHCR-WFP Targeting Hub to facilitate the inclusion of Malian refugees in the national social registry. Accordingly, the two UN agencies assisted Mauritania’s National Social Registry to conduct a socio-economic census to identify the most vulnerable households to target for prioritized assistance. Around 14,000 households were interviewed. The purpose of the census was to: - Collect socio-economic information on all refugees in Bassikounou to understand needs at household level - Categorize refugee households based on their degree of vulnerability to inform programmatic decisions and joint targeting approaches - Include all refugees in the national Social Registry - Identify and include the most vulnerable refugees in the national social protection scheme, Tekavoul
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 12 April 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-November 16, 2021
    War-Damaged Shelter Rehabilitation data as submitted by humanitarian and development actors undertaking assessment and rehabilitation of war-damaged shelter for returnees across the country.
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    This dataset updates: Every six months
  • Cash-based Interventions (CBIs) are a dignified form of assistance, giving recipients the ability to immediately prioritise and address their needs for food, shelter/accommodation, and other necessities. CBIs also directly complement community protection measures and support the local economy and can contribute to peaceful coexistence within and across communities. UNHCR Afghanistan has used cash-based interventions for several years for a wide range of purposes, including voluntary repatriation, basic needs, community-based protection, and livelihoods among others. UNHCR seeks to improve cash programming by regularly and systematically collecting information through post-distribution monitoring (PDM) on several aspects related to UNHCR’s CBIs including efficiency of cash delivery, access to markets, use of cash, unmet needs and coping strategies. Findings are expected to help UNHCR to improve the way the CBIs are designed and delivered. This PDM covers two CBI programmes delivered by UNHCR in in the Eastern Region of Afghanistan in 2020, cash for protection and cash for shelter. Cash for protection was designed to support households with specific protection profiles to cope with the socio-economic consequences of COVID-19 and avoid harmful coping strategies. Cash for shelter was designed to support vulnerable households with conditional cash grants to construct safe and dignified shelter. While the programmes were carried out countrywide, supporting 13,792 households with cash for protection and 506 with cash for shelter, the Eastern Region supported the largest number of CBI recipients. As such, this region was prioritized for the PDM data collection which took place in Kunar, Laghman, Nangarhar, and Nuristan provinces.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: September 03, 2018-March 31, 2019
    This report covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 464 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2018 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between September 2018 and March 2019, and were performed by teams composed of at least two members, one from the shelter team and one from the protection unit. The monitored sample covers repairs completed in the geographic areas of all five UNHCR offices in eastern Ukraine (Mariupol, Sloviansk and Sievierodonetsk in government-controlled areas [GCA]; Donetsk and Luhansk in non-government-controlled areas [NGCA]). The 464 monitoring visits on which this report is based represent 34% of the 1,374 repairs conducted in 2018 by UNHCR: a significant improvement compared to the 13% covered in the 2017 shelter monitoring exercise (232 visits out of 1,732 repairs conducted). The monitoring of 2018 shelter activities confirms the main findings of the 2017 campaign: the repair of houses damaged by conflict-related incidents is still highly appreciated by recipients (95% of respondents, compared to 97% in 2017) and is executed with good quality (99% of cases, compared to 100% in 2017).
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 03, 2019-April 30, 2020
    This report covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 433 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2019 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between October 2019 and April 2020, and were performed by teams composed of at least two members, one from the shelter team and one from the protection unit. The form has two main sections, one focusing on technical aspects, the other on protection. A few changes to the questionnaire were introduced in 2019, mainly to capture the feedback on cash based interventions; all changes, though, comply with the principle of preserving the comparability of data and findings across the implementation years. The monitored sample covers repairs completed in the geographic areas of four of the five UNHCR offices in eastern Ukraine: Mariupol, Sloviansk and Sievierodonetsk in governmentcontrolled areas (GCA); and Donetsk in non government-controlled areas (NGCA). Last year, Luhansk office in NGCA was not allowed to implement field visits and therefore could not contribute to the 20192 monitoring exercise. The 433 monitoring visits on which this report is based represent 33 per cent of the 1,316 repairs conducted in 2019 by UNHCR, in line with last year’s already satisfactory achievement.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 17 January 2022 | Dataset date: March 01, 2020-March 01, 2020
    Indicadores de privaciones y deficiencias en el acceso a servicios públicos por parte de población refugiada, migrante y retornados procedentes de Venezuela y comunidades anfitrionas en Colombia. Variables desagregadas por sexo, rango etario (mayor y menor de edad) y zona urbano/rural: Hacinamiento Sin acueducto Sin alcantarillado Sin combustible adecuado para cocinar Sin espacio exclusivo para la cocina Sin internet Sin recogida de basuras Sin refrigerador Sin sanitario Sin suministro continuo de agua
    600+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 2 November 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 01, 2021
    The IMU of the ACU, issues its fourth edition of the “Winter Needs in the Northern Syrian Camps” report, addressing 680 camps in the governorates of Aleppo and Idleb. The report brings to light the most important items that IDPs are in need for in terms of type and quantities, according to international standards for humanitarian response. It furthermore, brings emphasis to bear on the course of action that IDPs, as well as the camp management teams, should follow to drive down the effects of natural disasters that may put their lives at risk. Noting that the number of families that ACU enumerators were able to assess their needs reached 156,873 families, making up an overall individual number of 872,082 IDPs
    40+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 24 October 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2021-August 16, 2021
    The ninth round of Iraq's Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment (MCNA) conducted by REACH Initiative in close coordination with the Assessment Working Group (AWG), UN OCHA, Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG) and partners for data collection, seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority needs of conflict-affected populations living across the whole of Iraq. Between June 09 and August 16, 2021, a total of 11,645 in-camp IDP, out of camp IDP, and returnee households were assessed in a total of 64 districts in Iraq (including 27 formal camps).
    300+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Updated 5 October 2021 | Dataset date: June 16, 2021-August 04, 2021
    REACH initiative, in coordination with the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) Cluster, conducted the XV round of Camp Profiling and the eighth round of Movement Intentions in IDP camps. Both assessments seek to understand the multi-sectoral needs of IDPs in camps, their movement intentions in the short and long term, and the barriers that IDPs face to return to their area of origin (AoO).
    100+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every year
  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2020-May 17, 2020
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Tahoua, 6,955 households were registered between May and October 2020. They originated from Tahoua, Tillia and other departments in the Tahoua region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
    10+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: March 07, 2020-October 06, 2020
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Maradi, 2'169 households were registered between April and September 2020. They originated from 9 communes in Guidan Roumji, Madarounfa and other departments in the Maradi region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: March 07, 2020-October 06, 2020
    The enrolment of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) was conduced in Maradi, Tahoua and Tillaberi in Niger by the Government through the National Committee for Data Collection and Information Management on Internally Displaced Persons in Niger established in October 2019. The Committee acts in these regions with the technical support of UNHCR. Its aim is to ensure an adequate protection response for IDPs following the attacks perpetrated by non-state armed groups in their villages. The enrolment helped to identify the socio-economic profile of IDPs and their needs, detect potential cases of statelessness, and ease the aid of the humanitarian community. The enrolment data contain information on heads of households, family composition, specific needs of household members, documents held by family members, reasons for displacement, places of origin and current location. In Tillaberi, 4,859 households were registered between May and October 2020. They originated from 16 communes in Abala, Ayerou, Balleyara, Bankilare, Gotheye, Ouallam, Tera, Tillaberi and Torodi departments in the Tillaberi region of Niger. The data provided here is a sample of the original data.
    10+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Located in rural northern Uganda, Rhino Camp is home to more than 80,000 refugees3 – mostly South Sudanese who fled since July 2016. Other Rhino Camp residents come from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sudan, as well as the host Ugandan community. 74% of all heads of household are women,4 and Rhino Camp is one of a growing number of refugee settlements across nine UNHCR operations where solar street lamps are in use. Between April and June 2015 UNHCR installed some three dozen community lights in 50% of Rhino Camp’s 14 villages. As demand for community lighting far exceeded available funds, UNHCR worked with the refugee community and its partner the Danish Refugee Council to prioritize the strategic placement of lights within villages. The partners jointly selected locations where (1) refugees were prone to nighttime violence, theft or other safety risks, and (2) lights would promote constructive night-time activity. Using a 72-question survey, researchers asked respondents what day- and night-time6 activities they and their children do, and whether they do these activities in lit or unlit locations. Researchers then asked respondents if they feared or had been victims of something bad while doing these activities. The phrase something bad is the English translation for the most commonly used expressions – in Nuer, Dinka, Bari, and Kiswahili – of being a victim of an aggressive act or encountering danger. Survey responses reveal that the bad experiences that respondents most commonly fear are sexual and physical violence, theft, verbal harassment, injury, and encounters with animals
    This dataset updates: Never
  • The assistance dataset includes the assistance history of the households that have taken the 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) assessment. The dataset is extracted from Refugees Assistance Information System (RAIS) which is an online Inter-Agency web application used by Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (LCRP) partners in Lebanon for tracking and reporting assistance provided to persons of concern to UNHCR.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 16 June 2021 | Dataset date: June 01, 2019-August 31, 2019
    Primary data will be collected by means of a household-level survey designed with the participation of the humanitarian clusters in Somalia. Cluster leads are asked to outline information gaps and the type of data required to inform their strategic plans. Key indicators are developed by REACH with the substantive input of participating partners, and subsequently validated by the clusters. REACH will draft the household survey tool through an iterative consultation process with cluster partners and OCHA and is aligned, as much as possible, with the Joint Inter-Sectoral Analysis Framework (JIAF) which will serve as a common and structured method for assessing the severity of needs across different clusters. The assessment will use stratified cluster sampling at the district level using settlements as the clusters and households as the unit of measurement. For some districts, 2-stage stratified random sampling will be used instead of stratified cluster sampling for large urban centres, if it proves to be more efficient and logistically feasible for data collection. The sample will be stratified by population group, disaggregated by non-displaced communities, and IDP settlements; the sample will be further stratified by district to ensure coverage and comparison across the entire country (with the exception of inaccessible areas). In the case of cluster sampling, the minimum cluster size will be set to 6 households. The sample size will be adjusted for the design effect and will enable generalisation of the results to each of the two population strata in each district, with a 90% confidence level and a 10% margin of error.
    This data is by request only