• Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    Kenya hosts over half a million refugees, who, along with their hosts in urban and camp areas, face difficult living conditions and limited socioeconomic opportunities. Most refugees in Kenya live in camps located in the impoverished counties of Turkana (40 percent) and Garissa (44 percent), while 16 percent inhabit urban areas—mainly in Nairobi but also in Mombasa and Nakuru. Refugees in Kenya are not systematically included in national surveys, creating a lack of comparable socioeconomic data on camp-based and urban refugees, and their hosts. As the third of a series of surveys focusing on closing this gap, this Socioeconomic Survey of Urban Refugees's aim is to understand the socioeconomic needs of urban refugees in Kenya, especially in the face of ongoing conflicts, environmental hazards, and others shocks, as well as the recent government announcement to close Kenya’s refugee camps, which highlights the potential move of refugees from camps into urban settings The SESs are representative of urban refugees and camp-based refugees in Turkana County. For the Kalobeyei 2018 and Urban 2020–21 SESs, households were randomly selected from the UNHCR registration database (proGres), while a complete list of dwellings, obtained from UNHCR’s dwelling mapping exercise, was used to draw the sample for the Kakuma 2019 SES. The Kalobeyei SES and Kakuma SES were done via Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI). Due to COVID-19 social distancing measures, the Urban SES was collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). The Kalobeyei SES covers 6,004 households; the Kakuma SES covers 2,127 households; and the Urban SES covers 2,438 households in Nairobi, Nakuru, and Mombasa. Questionnaires are aligned with national household survey instruments, while additional modules are added to explore refugee-specific dynamics. The SES includes modules on demographics, household characteristics, assets, employment, education, consumption, and expenditure, which are aligned with the Kenya Integrated Household Budget Survey (KIHBS) 2015–16 and the recent Kenya Continuous Household Survey (KCHS) 2019. Additional modules on access to services, vulnerabilities, social cohesion, mechanisms for coping with lack of food, displacement trajectories, and durable solutions are administered to capture refugee-specific challenges.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Registration in Uganda is carried out by the Government of Uganda through the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) with support from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). In October 2021, OPM and UNHCR commenced a joint verification and individual profiling exercise (IPE) targeting 1,549,181 refugees and asylum seekers consisting of 388,989 households residing in all settlements and urban areas in Uganda. The main population groups are the South Sudanese (61%), Congolese (29%), Burundi (3%), Somali (3%) and the remaining 3% being refugees and asylum seekers from 27 different countries. The exercise is expected to be completed by end of October 2022. The exercise aims to verify the refugee population in Uganda, issue new generation refugee documents (QR compatible) and assess the social economic profiles of refugee households through Individual profiling. Verification will be combined with individual profiling using a desk bound assessment questionnaire, with validation of profiling data through sampling by making home visits. 10% of the verified households will be sampled based on strata covering settlement, country of origin, ethnicity, household with persons with special needs, family composition and year of arrival. By mid July 2022, verification/individual profiling was complete in 6 priority settlements (Imvepi, Kyaka II, Kyangwali, Nakivale, Oruchinga and Rwamwanja) with 9,480 home visits undertaken.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Following the influx of refugee-returnees from Pakistan and Iran in 2016, UNHCR has been supporting the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan's (GoIRA) Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MoRR) through a series of programmes aimed at providing durable solutions for returnees and long-term displaced populations in Afghanistan. 20 locations were identified by UNHCR and GoIRA as Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR locations). In these locations, large populations of refugee-returnees, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and host communities live together. Within these PARR locations, UNHCR implemented its short and medium-term Community-based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (CO-PROSPER) programmes to promote long-term development initiatives. UNHCR aimed to develop an area-based, humanitarian-development-peace triple nexus response to support durable solutions and create conducive conditions for the sustainable reintegration of displaced persons. To understand the impact of these programmes on the PARR locations, IMPACT Initiatives (IMPACT) conducted an evaluation of the impact of the programmes in PARR locations across four different dimensions: 1) community leadership inclusivity, 2) strengthening public services and equitable access, 3) income generation and economic empowerment, and 4) peacebuilding, and created indices to measure progress over these four key objectives that can be compared against the programme goals. In order to conduct this assessment, a mixed-method approach was used with two structured tools with separate methodologies to assess each site as follows. A HH level tool was used to interview a representative sample of HHs in each of the 20 PARR locations, with a 95% confidence level and a 10% margin of error. While aggregated (to the overall HH level) results are representative by population group (IDPs, refugee-returnees, and host communities) and by location, findings per population group in the locations are indicative only. Household data collection took place from 20 February to 4 March 2021. A total of 2,039 households in representing a total population of 1,347,207 people (approximately 192,458 households) across 20 PARR locations were interviewed.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 07, 2021-November 19, 2021
    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugess (UNHCR) and World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a joint assessment mission (JAM) of Nigerian refugees in the Far North of Cameroon between October 7 and 19, 2021. The objective of the assessment was to collect updated information on basic needs, shelter, food security, nutrition, water and sanitation, education, protection, security, common services, and livelihoods of Nigerian refugees to inform improved humanitarian assistance. Assessment data was collected at three levels: household, children under five and women of child-bearing age. Stratified random sampling was used to collect the data, with two main strata: 1) Nigerian refugees in the Minawao camp and 2) Nigerian refugees outside of camps. The second strata was further divided into strata by department: Diamaré, Logone-et-Chari, Mayo-Sava, Mayo-Tsanaga. Raw survey weights were calculated by dividing the size of the sample frame by the sample size per strata. The published data on the MDL are an anonymous version of the original data.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 22, 2021-December 05, 2021
    Since 2017, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting durable solutions aimed at returns and reintegration through its Community based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (Co-PROSPER) in Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR). Initially supporting 1,347,207 individuals in 20 PARR locations in 11 provinces, in 2021, the programme was then further expanded in December 2021 to an additional 1,423,775 individuals in another 20 PARR locations in 19 provinces. In order to establish a baseline for the population prior to intervention, IMPACT conducted a Socio-Economic Vulnerability Assessment (SEVA) of the 20 locations. Between 22 November and 5 December 2021, IMPACT interviewed 2,031 households in each of the 20 new PARR locations on household vulnerabilities, community leadership inclusivity, service quality and access, livelihoods and economic outlook, and community relations and stability. The following preliminary findings note shares the key findings from the assessment, to provide an understanding of the overall level of integration of households living in the new PARRs
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: August 04, 2021-September 28, 2021
    Violent extremism carried out by the Boko Haram group in Nigeria and government measures to contain it have led to intense population movement and human suffering in the Lake Chad basin. Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad are particularly affected. Since 2014, the number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Far North region of Cameroon has steadily increased due to attacks by armed groups, in particular Boko Haram and rival groups. The situation of IDPs is worrying for the authorities. In 2019, new waves of conflict and violence, associated with flooding, triggered more internal displacement. As of October 2021, the Far North region had 341,535 IDPs and 124,310 returnees (IOM DTM Round 22). In order to ensure the protection of IDPs in the three departments most affected in the Far North (Mayo-Sava, Mayo-Tsanaga et Logone-Et-Chari), a need was expressed by the different actors in the region and the authorities for credible detailed statistics on the IDP households and individuals that could be used for planning purposes. In this light, UNHCR supported the authorities in undertaking an IDP pilot profiling exercise between July and September 2021 in Mayo-Tsanaga. The profiling collected data on a number of topics that could be used to assess the needs of the IDP population and identify solutions, namely living conditions, food security, essential items and legal protection. The profiling was carried out by UNHCR and the Comité Mixte de Protection which composed mainly of public service agents in the department of Mayo-Tsanaga. The profiling covered 85,908 IDPs in 17,572 households in 201 sites and villages. These data are an anonymized sample of the original data, and include two tables from two questionnaires: one at the household level and one at the individuals household member level.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: September 07, 2021-September 20, 2021
    Until May 2021 all registered refugees in Rwanda received food assistance. Against the background of ever-limited resources and recognizing that the refugee population is not homogeneously vulnerable, in mid-2021 WFP and UNHCR initiated the shift to the targeted provision of food assistance based on needs. A targeting strategy – developed by UNHCR and WFP with support from the Joint UNHCR-WFP Programme Excellence and Targeting Hub - was formulated with the following objectives: - Identify vulnerable refugee households in need of humanitarian assistance and less vulnerable refugees with higher livelihood resilience who would benefit from livelihoods support; - Ensure the greatest protection outcomes through strong community participation, communications with refugee communities and risk analysis to inform the approach. This second JPDM has served to ensure that the corporate practice of post-distribution monitoring is fulfilled. Additionally, it assessed the extent to which the targeting approach has – over a period of five months between May and September 2021 – achieved the above objectives. Overall vulnerability among refugee households – defined by livelihood resilience, economic capacity and food access - reduced over a period of nine months between December 2020 and September 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 21, 2021-December 13, 2021
    Since 2017, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting durable solutions aimed at returns and reintegration through its Community based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (Co-PROSPER) in Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR). Initially supporting 1,347,207 individuals in 20 PARR locations in 11 provinces, in 2021, the programme was then further expanded in December 2021 to an additional 1,423,775 individuals in another 20 PARR locations in 19 provinces. In order to establish a baseline for the population prior to intervention, IMPACT conducted a Socio-Economic Vulnerability Assessment (SEVA) of the 20 locations. Between 22 November and 5 December 2021, IMPACT interviewed 2,031 households in each of the 20 new PARR locations on household vulnerabilities, community leadership inclusivity, service quality and access, livelihoods and economic outlook, and community relations and stability. Key Informant (KIs) interviews were conducted to assess community leadership in each of the 20 new PARR locations to provide indicative information on infrastructure, service presence, stakeholder presence, and conditions faced by specific displacement groups in each site. The KI survey also aimed to provide additional information on each site and location to complement HH survey findings. Nine KIs were interviewed in each location (except for two locations where certain population groups were absent).
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 7 July 2022 | Dataset date: June 01, 2017-August 15, 2022
    This dashboard highlights the living situation in Syria by showing the prices of basic market items. How to use this product: The first three pages track price change chronologically on governorate level, with ability to compare between them by choosing one or more. The subsequent pages show the prices of market items on the governorate and sub-district level with an item availability heat map of any selected item on any selected level and period. You can select one of the listed items in one sub-district or more. When you choose a governorate its subdistrict(s) will be highlighted according to the availability of the selected item in the selected governorate(s).
    5800+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every month
  • The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has developed a monitoring system in 25 food crisis countries to better understand the impacts of various shocks on agricultural livelihoods, food security and local value chains. The Monitoring System consists of primary data collected from households and key informants (including agricultural inputs vendors, food traders and agriculture extension officers) on a periodic basis (more or less every four months, depending on seasonality). Data are mainly collected through Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI). In-person surveys are conducted where the circumstances allow for field access. As the system is developed, the information collected and analyzed is being used to guide strategic decisions, to design programmes and to inform analytical processes such as the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) and the Humanitarian Needs Overview (HNO). At the core of the system is a standardized household questionnaire administered to around 100,000 households across the 25 countries. Standardization permits comparisons across time and space, considerably enhancing the utility of the data for decision makers. At minimum the household data are representative at Admin 1 level (e.g. province, or region) and in some cases at Admin 2 level (e.g. district). Core funding for this initiative comes from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The initiative also benefits from support from the European Union and FAO’s Special Fund for Emergency and Rehabilitation (SFERA). The contents of the work are the sole responsibility of FAO and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID, the United States Government or the European Union. On the Hub Homepage ( https://data-in-emergencies.fao.org/ ) it is possible to create an account and explore/download aggregated data related to the following thematic areas: 1) Incomes and shocks 2) Crop Production 3) Livestock Production 4) Food Security 5) Needs Aggregated datasets are generated from household interviews performed after August 2021. At every new survey data release, after cleaning and validation phases, aggregated data is appended to the present datasets. In each aggregated field, the values indicate the frequencies of the different responses, expressed as a weighted percentage of the total sample.
    This data is by request only
  • Updated 29 May 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-December 31, 2021
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 29 May 2022 | Dataset date: April 27, 2021-June 16, 2021
    For decades, Mauritania has maintained a generous open door policy towards Malians fleeing conflict. The most recent large-scale influx of Malians occurred in 2012, and resulted in the creation of the Mbera camp, which today hosts around 75,000 refugees. Because the large-scale return of Malians is not yet a viable option, Mauritania has committed itself to a policy of inclusion. It thus requested support from the UNHCR-WFP Targeting Hub to facilitate the inclusion of Malian refugees in the national social registry. Accordingly, the two UN agencies assisted Mauritania’s National Social Registry to conduct a socio-economic census to identify the most vulnerable households to target for prioritized assistance. Around 14,000 households were interviewed. The purpose of the census was to: - Collect socio-economic information on all refugees in Bassikounou to understand needs at household level - Categorize refugee households based on their degree of vulnerability to inform programmatic decisions and joint targeting approaches - Include all refugees in the national Social Registry - Identify and include the most vulnerable refugees in the national social protection scheme, Tekavoul
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 22 May 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2017
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 26 April 2022 | Dataset date: July 10, 2019-April 27, 2021
    This dataset contains the results of a household survey to evaluate the impact of an unconditional cash transfer on child labour and other child and household outcomes amongst cocoa farmers in Ghana. Baseline (2019) and follow-up (2021) data was collected from a sample of 644 cocoa growing households in Ahafo and Eastern regions. All recipient households were members of certified cooperative. The study was set up as a Randomized Control Trial - a randomly selected sub-set of these farmers received 6 months of unconditional cash payments between the baseline and follow-up survey.
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Updated 10 April 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-June 30, 2021
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 April 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2021-September 30, 2021
    The data was collected using the High Frequency Survey (HFS), the new regional data collection tool & methodology launched in the Americas. The survey allowed for better reaching populations of interest with new remote modalities (phone interviews and self-administered surveys online) and improved sampling guidance and strategies. It includes a set of standardized regional core questions while allowing for operation-specific customizations. The core questions revolve around populations of interest's demographic profile, difficulties during their journey, specific protection needs, access to documentation & regularization, health access, coverage of basic needs, coping capacity & negative mechanisms used, and well-being & local integration. The data collected has been used by countries in their protection monitoring analysis and vulnerability analysis.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 April 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2019-July 30, 2019
    This one-off data collection exercise had the purpose of facilitating decision-making processes. The exercize took place within the month of July 2019 and no further frequency is expected. A total of 308 households were surveyed. The population currently living in shelters was classified in three categories for further intervention, namely: 1) Population willing to relocate and/or already registered in the Interiorization programme; 2) Population not willing to relocate to another part of the country; 3) Vulnerable population classified by evident Specific Needs. These categories are not mutually exclusive.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • As of July 2019, it is estimated that over 4,054,000 Venezuelans have left the country and approximately 168,357 have either requested asylum or temporary residency in Brazil, mainly in Roraima state and progressively in the city of Manaus in Amazonas state. Utilising an Area-Based Approach, REACH collected localised information on the situation of Venezuelan asylum seekers and migrants living in host communities and abrigos managed by humanitarian actors in city neighbourhoods across Boa Vista, Pacaraima and Manaus. The aim was to increase the understanding of humanitarian actors of the living conditions, primary needs, vulnerabilities and coping strategies of the asylum seekers and migrants. This study aims to provide a representative overview of the profiles of Venezuelan asylum seekers and migrants living in different geographic locations and shelter settings in Brazil, for the purpose of increasing the understanding of humanitarian actors as to the extent to which the living conditions, needs, and vulnerabilities of Venezuelan households vary between households living in abrigos and those living in host communities, across three cities that are relevant nodes in the Brazilian refugee response: Pacaraima, Boa Vista, and Manaus. The findings indicate that challenges related to accessing services are relatively similar across different locations and shelter settings. The findings indicate that challenges related to accessing services are relatively similar across different locations and shelter settings. Of all services, Venezuelans seem to face the most challenges regarding access to education; findings suggest that a lack of required documents and a limited local capacity are constraining the enrolment of Venezuelan children into local schools. These two factors were also the most likely to pose barriers to accessing social services and healthcare facilities. Difficulties in speaking the local language and long distances to facilities were found to further constrain households' access to services, albeit to a lesser extent.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 April 2022 | Dataset date: May 02, 2019-July 05, 2019
    The Federal Government Interiorization strategy implemented by Operation Welcome voluntarily relocates Venezuelan refugees and migrants from the states of Roraima and Amazonas to other cities in the country. This study had the purpose to analysise a cohort of households before and after interiorization. 366 households were interviewed in Boa Vista before departure. 148 follow up telephone interviews took place 6-8 weeks following their departure. 145 households that relocated more than 4 months prior ro the research action were interviewed as control group.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 April 2022 | Dataset date: November 11, 2016-December 31, 2016
    In September 2014, the Government of El Salvador created the Consejo Nacional de Seguridad Ciudadana y Convivencia (CNSCC), whose main objective is to promote and facilitate dialogue and agreement around public policies on justice, citizen security and coexistence. Through this space, the Plan El Salvador Seguro (PESS) was discussed and approved in 2015, which consists of five axes and hundreds of actions to confront violence and crime, guarantee access to justice and protection for victims of all types of crime. In the framework of the implementation of Axis 4 of the PESS (attention and protection of victims), and given the State's concern to determine the characteristics and impact of internal mobility due to violence in El Salvador, the Ministry of Justice and Public Security (MJSP), in coordination with the Secretariat of Governance and Communications (SEGOB), promoted the realization of a profiling study on the dimension, tendencies and profiles of the people and families forced to diplace internally due to violence in recent years. For this effort, the support of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) was requested. The study shows that in El Salvador internal mobility is a multi-causal phenomenon, with the economic and family reasons being predominant. With a significantly lower incidence, it is confirmed that acts of violence or crimes committed against the population are located as the third cause of internal mobility of the population in recent years. According to the information collected, in 1.1% of resident families at least one of its members was forced to change their usual place of residence within El Salvador as to avoid the effects of facts of violence.
    This dataset updates: Never