• Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a winterization distribution.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a winterization distribution.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a distribution of education grants
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a distribution of grants given to support the Covid-19 response.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: August 03, 2021-August 25, 2021
    In the last quarter of 2021, a full-fledged participatory assessment exercise was successfully organized by UNHCR and conducted through 17 UNHCR protection partners in all the 14 Syrian governorates. With the participation of almost 9,000 internally displaced people, returnees and host communities. The dataset is a consolidation of approximately 870 focus group discussions conducted.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 17, 2021-January 19, 2022
    In July-August 2021, a participatory assessment was conducted to map the protection gaps and challenges faced by refugees and asylum-seekers in Syria. The assessment was conducted mainly through 80 focus group discussions (FGDs) that were conducted in 11 Governorates with the participation of 712 PoCs. The FDGs were conducted in areas with the largest refugee and asylum-seeker populations. The main areas included Damascus / Rural Damascus (26 FGDs), Hassakeh (18 FDGs) and Aleppo (12 FDGs). During the discussions, refugees and asylum seekers identified various protection challenges and made recommendations to UNHCR.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: September 07, 2021-September 20, 2021
    Until May 2021 all registered refugees in Rwanda received food assistance. Against the background of ever-limited resources and recognizing that the refugee population is not homogeneously vulnerable, in mid-2021 WFP and UNHCR initiated the shift to the targeted provision of food assistance based on needs. A targeting strategy – developed by UNHCR and WFP with support from the Joint UNHCR-WFP Programme Excellence and Targeting Hub - was formulated with the following objectives: - Identify vulnerable refugee households in need of humanitarian assistance and less vulnerable refugees with higher livelihood resilience who would benefit from livelihoods support; - Ensure the greatest protection outcomes through strong community participation, communications with refugee communities and risk analysis to inform the approach. This second JPDM has served to ensure that the corporate practice of post-distribution monitoring is fulfilled. Additionally, it assessed the extent to which the targeting approach has – over a period of five months between May and September 2021 – achieved the above objectives. Overall vulnerability among refugee households – defined by livelihood resilience, economic capacity and food access - reduced over a period of nine months between December 2020 and September 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 24 May 2022 | Dataset date: September 30, 2020-December 31, 2021
    Cash Based Programming in Somalia. Data are aggregated at admin level 2
    8200+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Every three months
  • UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. To ensure the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. This CBI PDM took place in Anderambouane in the Ménaka region of Mali in April 2020. It includes 251 returnee and host community households out of 1,161 who received cash from UNHCR. Most returnees were refugees returning from Chinagodrare (Niger), with a small portion returning from internal displacement within the Ménaka region. The objective of the cash intervention was to support shelter, non-food items and basic needs. Each household received 150,000 FCFA.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 26 April 2022 | Dataset date: July 10, 2019-April 27, 2021
    This dataset contains the results of a household survey to evaluate the impact of an unconditional cash transfer on child labour and other child and household outcomes amongst cocoa farmers in Ghana. Baseline (2019) and follow-up (2021) data was collected from a sample of 644 cocoa growing households in Ahafo and Eastern regions. All recipient households were members of certified cooperative. The study was set up as a Randomized Control Trial - a randomly selected sub-set of these farmers received 6 months of unconditional cash payments between the baseline and follow-up survey.
    This dataset updates: As needed
  • Cash-based Interventions (CBIs) are a dignified form of assistance, giving recipients the ability to immediately prioritise and address their needs for food, shelter/accommodation, and other necessities. CBIs also directly complement community protection measures and support the local economy and can contribute to peaceful coexistence within and across communities. UNHCR Afghanistan has used cash-based interventions for several years for a wide range of purposes, including voluntary repatriation, basic needs, community-based protection, and livelihoods among others. UNHCR seeks to improve cash programming by regularly and systematically collecting information through post-distribution monitoring (PDM) on several aspects related to UNHCR’s CBIs including efficiency of cash delivery, access to markets, use of cash, unmet needs and coping strategies. Findings are expected to help UNHCR to improve the way the CBIs are designed and delivered. This PDM covers two CBI programmes delivered by UNHCR in in the Eastern Region of Afghanistan in 2020, cash for protection and cash for shelter. Cash for protection was designed to support households with specific protection profiles to cope with the socio-economic consequences of COVID-19 and avoid harmful coping strategies. Cash for shelter was designed to support vulnerable households with conditional cash grants to construct safe and dignified shelter. While the programmes were carried out countrywide, supporting 13,792 households with cash for protection and 506 with cash for shelter, the Eastern Region supported the largest number of CBI recipients. As such, this region was prioritized for the PDM data collection which took place in Kunar, Laghman, Nangarhar, and Nuristan provinces.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2020-November 30, 2020
    UNHCR conducts post-distribution monitoring (PDM) on a regular basis for assistance activities in order to deepen its understanding of the impact these activities have on the persons the organization assists and provides protection to. In Ukraine, UNHCR provides individual protection assistance in the following regions: Kyiv, Odesa, Zakarpattya (also covers Lviv) and Kharkiv regions. The UNHCR Cash-Based Interventions (CBI) support only vulnerable refugees and asylum-seekers. The type of assistance vary depending on the needs and vulnerability of persons of concern. the following types of CBI assistance that were provided to refugees and asylum-seekers by UNHCR and its Partners in Ukraine in 2020: 1. Supplementary assistance and newcomers assistance - Modality: voucher (Metro cards, a supermarket chain that partners with UNHCR) - Available only in Kyiv and Odesa - Description: Distribution of vouchers (Metro cards) for food and non-food items to refugees and asylum-seekers who meet established vulnerability criteria (newcomers, PoCs in need of supplementary food or hygiene due to medical condition). In 2020, 121 families residing in Kyiv and Odesa received voucher assistance at least once. In 2020 UNHCR used Metro Cash&Carry (big supermarket chain) cards in the value of 500 UAH. However, due to COVID-19 quarantine restrictions imposed by the government of Ukraine, UNHCR Ukraine has gradually shifted to provision of these types of assistance through other modalities. This PDM focused only on the cases processed through vouchers. MSA (Monthly Subsistence Allowance) Modality: cash. OTC (over the counter) Available in Kyiv, Odesa, Kharkiv Description: MSA (monthly subsistence allowance) aims to support the most vulnerable persons of concern. It is given based on the strict vulnerability criteria and cases are reviewed every four months at the MSA committee meetings, composed of partner social counselors, SMS and UNHCR. In 2020, 105 vulnerable families were covered by this type of support. The amount of MSA is calculated based on the family size. It is in line with the recommendations of the Cash Working Group on assistance provision at 60% of subsistence level (3 774.62 UAH as of February 2020), which corresponds to MSA amount. Assistance per single person provided by UNHCR amounted to 2 400 UAH per month, proportionally increased depending on the number of household members.
    10+ Downloads
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 08, 2018-November 30, 2018
    UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of CBI recipients. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. This CBI PDM took place in Ampain, Egyeikrom, Fetentaa and Krisan camps and some urban/semi-urban areas outside of camps in Ghana in October 2018. It includes 50 refugee households out of 536 who received cash from UNHCR. The majority of refugees were from Côte d'Ivoire with others from Sudan and Togo. The amount of cash received was based on the size of the household where households with one to three members were supposed to receive GH?50.00, households with four to six members GH?70.00 and household with greater than six members GH?70.00 multiplied by 8 months.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 18, 2021-January 31, 2021
    UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of CBI recipients. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. This CBI PDM took place in Ampain, Egyeikrom, Fetentaa and Krisan camps and some urban/semi-urban areas outside of camps in Ghana in January 2021. It includes 96 refugee households out of 706 who received cash from UNHCR. The majority of refugees were from Côte d'Ivoire with others from Sudan and Togo. The amount of cash received was based on the size of the household where households with one to three members were supposed to receive 50.00 Ghanian Cedi, households with four to six members 70.00 Ghanian Cedi and household with greater than six members 70.00 Ghanian Cedi multiplied by 3 months.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: March 17, 2020-February 05, 2021
    UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. To ensure the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR and its partners conduct regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. In 2020, through its partners Adonis Musati Project, Future Families, Refugee Social Services and Hand in Hand Development, UNHCR Southern African Multi-Country Office (SAMCO) provided multi-purpose cash (including for food, accommodation, household and hygiene items) to the most vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers in South Africa for a limited period of time (1 - 3 months) per individual, however, assistance could be extended after a re-assessment. The aim of the assistance was to focus essentially on life-saving and life-sustaining measures to vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers' needs. The CBI PDM was implemented by the partners after the intervention in their area was complete.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: December 05, 2020-December 22, 2021
    UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of CBI recipients. Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) is a mechanism to collect feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of assistance. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. This CBI PDM took place in the Est (Kadeï and Lom & Djerem) and Nord (Mayo Rey) regions of Cameroon in December 2020 following the cash intervention in mid-November 2020. More than 5,000 households were provided with cash with the objective of supporting basic needs and self-reliance. 400 beneficiary households were randomly sampled for the PDM.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2018-December 31, 2018
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2015-December 31, 2015
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
    This dataset updates: Never
  • Updated 30 January 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2014-December 31, 2014
    UNHCR monitors refugee returnees through the process of Voluntary Repatriation to Afghanistan. As part of this process, UNHCR interviews refugees willing to return to Afghanistan at the Voluntary Repatriation Centers in the country of asylum, monitors the return condition through household-level interviews at the Encashment Centers in Afghanistan and follows up on the returnees' situation in the areas of return one to six months later through phone surveys. Upon return to Afghanistan, returnees are assisted at four Encashment Centers with a cash grant to support their immediate humanitarian needs and transportation costs. Returning refugees receive a cash grant up to USD 250 per individual, as well as a range of services to support their reintegration. This dataset is from household interviews at the Encashment Centers. Other datasets from Encashment Centers are available for each year from 2010 to 2020. The objective of the interviews is to record details on the returnee households and family members including the amount of cash grant received.
    This dataset updates: Never