Data Grid Completeness
16/27 Core Data 38 Datasets 13 Organisations Show legend
What is Data Grid Completeness?
Data Grid Completeness defines a set of core data that are essential for preparedness and emergency response. For select countries, the HDX Team and trusted partners evaluate datasets available on HDX and add those meeting the definition of a core data category to the Data Grid Completeness board above. Please help us improve this feature by sending your feedback to hdx@un.org.
Legend:
Presence, freshness, and quality of dataset
  • Dataset fully matches criteria and is up-to-date
  • Dataset partially matches criteria and/or is not up-to-date
  • No dataset found matching the criteria
Expand
Affected People
6 Datasets
Internally-Displaced Persons
International Organization for Migration
Refugees & Persons of Concern
Returnees
International Organization for Migration
Humanitarian Profile Locations
Humanitarian Needs
Casualties
Coordination & Context
10 Datasets
Food Security & Nutrition
4 Datasets
Food security
Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC)
Severe Acute Malnutrition Rate
Food Prices
WFP - World Food Programme
Geography & Infrastructure
9 Datasets
Administrative Divisions
Populated Places
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Roads
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
OCHA Sudan
Airports
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Health & Education
7 Datasets
Health Facilities
Global Healthsites Mapping Project
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Affected Schools
Population & Socio-economy
3 Datasets
Baseline Population by Age & Sex
Poverty Rate
Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative
Data Datasets [260] | Archived Datasets[0] [?] Show filter:
Refine your search: Clear all
Featured:
Locations:
More
Formats:
More
Organisations:
More
Tags:
More
Licenses:
More
  • 600+ Downloads
    Updated 18 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2000-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Food Security Indicators for Sudan. Contains data from the FAOSTAT bulk data service.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 13 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-March 31, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    The data set contains the number of people in need, people targeted and people reached by humanitarian assistance in Sudan during the period January-March 2021.It contains the overall reached and the sector breakdowns too. The data is provided by admin 2 level.
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated 12 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-September 22, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Dataset contains Sudan baseline data -population,IDPs,Refugees,GAM,IPC- and the overall number of people in need(PIN ) and by sector down to admin 2 level.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 29 June 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2021-March 01, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Latest data shows that an estimated 7.3 million people in Sudan (16% of the population analyzed) are in high levels of acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) between April and May (current period) and require urgent action. Of these, around 5.5 million people are classified in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) while around 1.8 million are critically food insecure classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). The most affected localities of Red Sea State (Halaib and Jubayt-el-maaadin) are classified in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). An increase in localized conflicts triggered population displacement, which, combined with the deterioration of the economy, led to higher than usual levels of acute food insecurity. As a result, the highest prevalence of population in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse are observed in North Darfur (25%), followed by West Darfur (22%), North Kordofan (20%), South Kordofan (20%), Gedarif (19%) and Central, East and South Darfur states, ranging from 17-18%.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 29 June 2021 | Dataset date: June 27, 2021-September 22, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    IOM Sudan DTM teams activated EET to monitor the displacement of individuals affected by inter-communal conflict between Masalit and Arab tribes. Clashes initially erupted on 16 January 2021 in the Krinding area of Ag Geneina town, West Darfur. On 3 April 2021, inter-communal conflict has escalated in the Hai Eljabal area of Ag Geneina town, West Darfur, resulting in additional displacement
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated 22 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2011-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    Data collated by UNHCR, containing information about forcibly displaced populations and stateless persons, spanning across 70 years of statistical activities. The data includes the countries / territories of asylum and origin. Specific resources are available for end-year population totals, demographics, asylum applications, decisions, and solutions availed by refugees and IDPs (resettlement, naturalisation or returns).
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 9 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2021-September 22, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every year
    This dataset is made for planning purposes. It contains the 2021 number of people potentially at risk of hazards (floods, disease outbreaks and conflict) in Sudan.
  • 50+ Downloads
    Updated 8 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-December 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Data on location, type, status of schools and corresponding number of students by state and locality.
  • 700+ Downloads
    Updated 30 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2008-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Internally displaced persons are defined according to the 1998 Guiding Principles (http://www.internal-displacement.org/publications/1998/ocha-guiding-principles-on-internal-displacement) as people or groups of people who have been forced or obliged to flee or to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as a result of armed conflict, or to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalized violence, violations of human rights, or natural or human-made disasters and who have not crossed an international border. "People Displaced" refers to the number of people living in displacement as of the end of each year. "New Displacement" refers to the number of new cases or incidents of displacement recorded, rather than the number of people displaced. This is done because people may have been displaced more than once. Contains data from IDMC's Global Internal Displacement Database.
  • Updated 27 May 2021 | Dataset date: April 01, 2019-May 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The South Sudan situation is currently the largest refugee situation on the African continent. There are over 2.2 million refugees spread across Sudan, Uganda, Ethiopia, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), and the Central African Republic (CAR) a further 1.8 million people are displaced internally in South Sudan. An estimated 140,000 South Sudanese spontaneously returnees are reported to have returned to South Sudan from November 2018 to date. The South Sudan situation continues to be characterized as a children's tragedy with children constituting over 65 percent of the refugee population. The Revitalised Agreement for the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic in South Sudan (R-ARCSS) foresees the formation of a Government of National Unity (GNU) with all the parties in agreement including the leader of the SPLA IO and first vice president by May 2019. In November 2018, it was agreed during the Kampala Representatives meeting that intention surveys should be conducted for South Sudanese refugees in all countries of asylum. This was further concretized in March 2019, during the EHA/GLR planning meeting; here it was decided that UNHCR country representations of CAR, Kenya, Uganda, DRC, Sudan, Ethiopia would ensure that a rapid intention survey of South Sudanese refugees in their respective asylum countries is carried out before May 2019, in line with the agreed calendar of the R-ARCSS The Intention Survey was a cross-sectional survey conducted among the over 2.2 million South Sudanese refugees living in six countries of asylum using a stratified random sampling approach to survey 6,964 refugees (heads of households) in 15 camps selected across the region. In each location, sample size estimation assumed a 95 per cent confidence level, and a margin of error of 7 per cent; sample was drawn taking into account the location, place of origin, ethnicity, year of arrival to the country of asylum and gender of the head of household. The confidence intervals were taken into consideration in all the tables and analysis. Security, access and logistical constraints restricted sampling in some locations, therefore weighting was applied to adjust for unequal selection probabilities in each of the 15 locations. The findings of this report are representative of the return intentions of refugee households in these 15 camps. Data was collected through in-person interviews using a harmonised survey that was conducted concurrently in the six countries in May 2019 with a mobile data collection tool (KoBo Toolkit). Questionnaires were administered to consenting refugees aged 12 years and above. Children below 12 years of age were excluded from the survey.
  • 50+ Downloads
    Updated 8 May 2021 | Dataset date: May 19, 2020-May 19, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Pool fund Extended allocation Details
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 4 May 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 1990-December 31, 2030
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The aim of the Human Development Report is to stimulate global, regional and national policy-relevant discussions on issues pertinent to human development. Accordingly, the data in the Report require the highest standards of data quality, consistency, international comparability and transparency. The Human Development Report Office (HDRO) fully subscribes to the Principles governing international statistical activities. The HDI was created to emphasize that people and their capabilities should be the ultimate criteria for assessing the development of a country, not economic growth alone. The HDI can also be used to question national policy choices, asking how two countries with the same level of GNI per capita can end up with different human development outcomes. These contrasts can stimulate debate about government policy priorities. The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of average achievement in key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, being knowledgeable and have a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the three dimensions. The 2019 Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) data shed light on the number of people experiencing poverty at regional, national and subnational levels, and reveal inequalities across countries and among the poor themselves.Jointly developed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) at the University of Oxford, the 2019 global MPI offers data for 101 countries, covering 76 percent of the global population. The MPI provides a comprehensive and in-depth picture of global poverty – in all its dimensions – and monitors progress towards Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 1 – to end poverty in all its forms. It also provides policymakers with the data to respond to the call of Target 1.2, which is to ‘reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women, and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definition'.
  • 7000+ Downloads
    Updated 30 April 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2016-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition (SHCC) is made up of 40 health provider organizations, humanitarian groups, human rights organizations, NGOs, and academic programs to take action to protect health workers and end attacks against them. This page is managed by SHCC member Insecurity Insight.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 15 April 2021 | Dataset date: March 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    Under the leadership of UNDP and DCO, an inter-agency task team developed the UN framework for the immediate socio-economic response to COVID-19 (adopted in April 2020) to govern its response over 12 to 18 months. To measure the UN’s support to the socio-economic response and recovery, UN entities developed a simple monitoring framework with 18 programmatic indicators (endorsed by the UNSDG in July 2020). Lead entities – based on their mandate and comparative advantage – were nominated to lead the development of methodological notes for each indicator and lead the collection of data at the country level. These lead entities reported through the Office of the Resident Coordinators the collective UN results on a quarterly basis through UN Info. All 2020 data was reported by March 2021. This is the UN development system’s first comprehensive attempt at measuring its collective programming contribution and results. These programmatic indicators enabled the UN system to monitor the progress and achievements of UNCT’s collective actions in socio-economic response. In support of the Secretary-General’s call for a "… single, consolidated dashboard to provide up-to-date visibility on [COVID-19] activities and progress across all pillars” all data was published in real time on the COVID-19 data portal, hosted by DCO. The data is disaggregated by geography (rural/urban), sex, age group and at-risk populations -- to measure system-wide results on the socio-economic response to the pandemic, in order to ensure UNDS accountability and transparency for results.
  • Updated 11 April 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2018-December 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
  • Updated 11 April 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The UNHCR Livelihoods Monitoring Framework takes a program-based approach to monitoring, with the aim of tracking both outputs and the impact of UNHCR dollars spent on programming (either via partners or through direct implementation). The process for developing the indicators began in 2015 with a review of existing tools and approaches. Consultations were held with governments, the private sector, field-based staff and civil society partners to devise a set of common, standardized measures rooted in global good practices. Since 2017, a data collection (survey) has been rolled out globally, and the participating operations conducted a household surveys to a sample of beneficiaries of each livelihoods project implemented by UNHCR and its partner. The dataset consists of baseline and endline data from the same sample beneficiaries, in order to compare before and after the project implementation and thus to measure the impact. More info is available on the official website: https://lis.unhcr.org
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 6 April 2021 | Dataset date: May 05, 2020-May 05, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This data was developed as part of the Modelling Exposure Through Earth Observation Routines (METEOR) project and is a Level 1, or a global-quality exposure data set. Minimal country-specific data was collected. The data is intended for CAT modeling and loss estimation. Repurposing this data for any reason other than assessing risk is not recommended. The data presents the estimated number of buildings, building area, and rebuilding value at a 15-arcsecond grid resolution (approximately 500 meters at the equator). This data set is in point shapefile format where the points represent the centroids of the 15-arcsecond grid. The results were created through a process of spreading the number of buildings to the 15-arcsecond level by a statistical assessment of moderate resolution EO data, which is described in more detail in the dasymetric mapping lineage processing step. The estimated building count at any given area is a result of statistical processes and should not be mistaken as a building count. The structural classes of buildings used for risk assessment are estimated given the building wall, floor, and roof material classes surveyed through 2002 Population and Housing Census - Volume 1. Analytical report. Additionally, the data is provided in Open Exposure Data (OED) import format, as a pair of CSV files. One CSV file contains the location details, and the other is an "account" file that is filled with default information to satisfy OED format requirements. The OED input files are set to use "All perils" (i.e. "AA1"). All required OED account-related fields are populated with "1" by default (such as PortNumber, AccNumber, PolNumber). If you find this data useful please provide feedback via our questionnaire; it should take only a few minutes: https://forms.gle/DQjhE89CRegNKB3X8 Please see the METEOR project page for information about the METEOR Project: http://meteor-project.org/ Please see the METEOR map portal for interactive maps: https://maps.meteor-project.org/ For more information about the Open Exposure Data (OED) standard, please see https://github.com/OasisLMF/OpenDataStandards
  • 600+ Downloads
    Updated 25 March 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The data set contains the people in need, people targeted and people reached by humanitarian assistance in Sudan during the period January-December 2020
  • 2300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 March 2021 | Dataset date: December 31, 2014-August 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The Who does What Where (3W) is a core humanitarian coordination dataset. It is critical to know where humanitarian organizations are working and what they are doing in order to identify gaps and plan for future humanitarian response. This dataset includes a list of humanitarian organizations by state and sector currently registered in Sudan. If you have updates for the 3W please contact OCHASudan@un.org.
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 9 March 2021 | Dataset date: February 24, 2021-March 03, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    The DTM Emergency Event Tracking (EET) is deployed to track sudden displacement and population movements, provide more frequent updates n the scale of displacement and quantify the affected population when needed.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 4 March 2021 | Dataset date: July 29, 2020-November 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought into stark focus the need for data and the value of models to inform response strategies. Since March, the Centre has been working with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) to develop a COVID-19 model adapted for use in humanitarian contexts. Access the - code repository , including all the source code scripts necessary to run the model. View the - technical documentation and - FAQs explaining how to configure and run the source code in the repository. Download the - methodology paper providing details on model assumptions and the main equations. Access - [biweekly reports] (https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/16FR8owccpfIm-tspdAa4YTEwPoZKHtvI) for six countries. Download the - OCHA-Bucky model card created according to the Centre’s Peer Review Framework. The result is a model, named OCHA-Bucky, that forecasts the number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths over two or four weeks, at the subnational and national levels.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 4 March 2021 | Dataset date: November 20, 2020-November 20, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Data on access constraints, aid workers security, % of affected CERF and CBPF projects combined with the status of Polio vaccination in the HRP countries.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated Live | Dataset date: February 08, 2021-September 22, 2021
    This dataset updates: Live
    Number of children 6-59 months admitted for TREATMENT OF SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION (SAM) by country
  • 80+ Downloads
    Updated 24 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 16, 2020-November 26, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This inaugural round of Sudan's Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), conducted by REACH and OCHA in close collaboration with the Inter-Sectoral Coordination Group (ISCG), seeks to understand multi-sectoral priority humanitarian needs of populations across the whole of Sudan. The findings from this assessment are presented in this document and are intended to provide timely updates on key sectoral needs and priorities in order to inform humanitarian response and strategic programming for non-displaced, IDP and refugee households across the country.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2018-July 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Government of Sudan and the international community are working together to jointly support durable solutions for Darfurs internally displaced people. The commitment is rooted in the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) from 2011, signed by the Government of Sudan, other major parties to the conflict and the international community, and which sets out the framework for peace in Darfur. The peace agreement and the Darfur Development Strategy (DDS) that followed constitute political commitments to support durable peace and development in Darfur. This pledge has resulted in piloting a durable solutions process in El Fasher in North Darfur. To reach durable solutions and end displacement, long-term planning based on agreed and jointly-owned comprehensive data is needed. To establish an agreed evidence base, a collaborative profiling approach was adopted that brought actors together to ensure trust and ownership of the results of the profiling exercise. An important aspect of this durable solutions profiling is that it places IDPs centre-stage alongside the two other major stakeholdersthe Government of Sudan and the international communitypermitting the profiling results and recommendations to be owned and signed off by all parties. The durable solutions profiling exercise in El Fasher makes up step two: getting better informed about the displacement affected communities in the five-stage durable solutions process. The survey included 3002 households. It specifically aims to: provide a comprehensive profile of IDPs residing in Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps; develop a better understanding of IDPs vulnerabilities, coping mechanisms, capacities and provide insight into IDPs perceptions and their future settlement intentions; provide a jointly agreed upon data set to help inform durable solutions programming responses; pilot a profiling exercise of displacement and joint durable solutions planning that could be replicated in other Sudan contexts with displaced populations.