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  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 22 June 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2011-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    Data collated by UNHCR, containing information about forcibly displaced populations and stateless persons, spanning across 70 years of statistical activities. The data includes the countries / territories of asylum and origin. Specific resources are available for end-year population totals, demographics, asylum applications, decisions, and solutions availed by refugees and IDPs (resettlement, naturalisation or returns).
  • Updated 27 May 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2018-May 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2018) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its sixth year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million Syrian refugees who have fled their country’s conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2018). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains the largest concentration of refugees per capita and the fourth largest refugee population in the world. VASyR includes a sample of 4,446 Syrian refugee households from 26 districts across Lebanon. The assessment demonstrates that despite the large scale assistance and the efforts of Lebanon and its partners that have resulted in improvements in economic vulnerability and stabilization in education, food security and some improvements in the situation for women, girls and female-headed households, Syrian refugees still remain very vulnerable. The economic context remains precarious and the protection needs to persist.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: April 22, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: September 15, 2020-October 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon. This wave focuses on: livelihoods, economic vulnerability, living conditions, access to health services, food and livelihood coping strategies, covid-19. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 28 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 23, 2018-September 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since the onset of the Syrian crisis, the humanitarian community has increasingly relied on cash-based assistance provided from donor contributions and implemented by aid partners under the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan to support the affected population. In November 2017, the World Food Programme (WFP) joined the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and non-governmental organisations (NGO) in the delivery of multi-purpose cash (MPC) to assist the most economically vulnerable Syrian refugee households to meet their basic needs. This study aims to measure the short-term (12 months or less) and long-term (more than 12 months) causal impact of the $173.50 and $175 MPC assistance provided by WFP and UNHCR respectively, over and above the $27 per person per month assistance, as well as the impact of discontinuation from MPC on the well-being of Syrian refugees. This report presents the causal impact on multiple dimensions of well-being, namely household expenditures, food security, housing, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), education, employment, health and decision-making. The key take-away messages from the study are: 1. The impact of MPC materialised across most dimensions of well-being in the long-term, indicating the importance of households' access to a longer duration of MPC. 2. The benefits of MPC fade for many indicators within 4 to 10 months after discontinuation, and households' well-being returned to pre-assistance levels for most indicators, and dropped slightly below the pre-assistance baseline for others. 3. The findings would suggest that there are benefits to instituting longer cash cycles and/or linking MPC to other services through a 'cash plus' approach to expand and extend the positive impact of cash on beneficiary households and ensure sustainable impact. A total of 11,457 households were visited and used in this analysis, which constitutes one of the largest samples among impact evaluations conducted in Lebanon to date.
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 21 February 2021 | Dataset date: August 19, 2020-September 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Nine years into the Syria conflict, Lebanon remains at the forefront of one of the worst humanitarian crises. The economic downturn, steep inflation, COVID-19 and finally the Beirut blast have pushed vulnerable communities in Lebanon - including Syrian refugees - to the brink, with thousands of families sinking further into poverty. The Government of Lebanon (GoL) estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million1 of the 6.6 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including 879,529 registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2020 ). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains one of the largest concentration of refugees per capita in the world. The 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) was the eighth annual survey assessing the situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their vulnerabilities. Given the COVID-19 pandemic in Lebanon, most assessments and other activities requiring in person visits were either cancelled or postponed. Considering the prolonged socio-economic status in Lebanon and COVID-19, it was crucial to provide needs-based estimates on Syrian refugees in the country. Thus, the VASyR 2020 was one of the few assessments that were conducted face-to-face; the implementation was accompanied by a comprehensive protocol to ensure the safety of families and field workers. The criticality of conducting the VASyR 2020 was to provide insights about Syrian refugees impacted by the political and economic crisis that hit Lebanon in late 2019 and by the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 16, 2018-May 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2018) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its sixth year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million Syrian refugees who have fled their country’s conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2018). The Syrian refugee population in Lebanon remains the largest concentration of refugees per capita and the fourth largest refugee population in the world. VASyR includes a sample of 4,446 Syrian refugee households from 26 districts across Lebanon. The assessment demonstrates that despite the large scale assistance and the efforts of Lebanon and its partners that have resulted in improvements in economic vulnerability and stabilization in education, food security and some improvements in the situation for women, girls and female-headed households, Syrian refugees still remain very vulnerable. The economic context remains precarious and the protection needs to persist.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR-2019) was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to provide a multi-sectoral update of the situation and to identify changes and trends. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). Survey teams visited 4,727 randomly selected Syrian refugee households, covering all districts across Lebanon. The result of the study demonstrates that while some improvements in specific indicators are noted, Syrian refugees in Lebanon continue to show heightened vulnerabilities. While rates of birth registration have seen an increase since previous years, other legal documentation issues (e.g. legal residency) remains to be an on-going challenge. About half of households are living in extreme poverty, despite large scale assistance programs to families. Additionally, while rent prices were not noted to increase dramatically, many families continue to live in substandard and over-crowded conditions across the country.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 08, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Vulnerability Assessment for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon Arsaal, was conducted jointly by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org). Now in its seventh year, the Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses a representative sample of Syrian refugee families to identify changes and trends in their situation. The Government of Lebanon estimates that the country hosts 1.5 million of the 6.7 million Syrians who have fled the conflict since 2011 (including nearly one million registered with UNHCR as of end of September 2019). VASyR Arsaal is an addition to the 2019 VASyR, containing a representative sample of Syrian Refugee households in Arsaal.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 09, 2017-May 24, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    The 2017 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon (VASyR) assesses the situation of a representative sample of registered Syrian refugee households to identify situational changes and trends. With over one million registered refugees within its borders, Lebanon hosts the second-largest population of Syrian refugees in the region, and the highest per capita population of refugees in the world. Since the first assessment, the VASyR has been an essential tool for partnership and for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. A total of 4966 households were interviewed. The contents of this report, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Childrens Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrate that economic vulnerability has worsened, with more than half of refugees living in extreme poverty, and that food insecurity rates are stable, but remain high.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 23, 2016-June 04, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    The 2016 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) surveyed a representative sample of Syrian refugee households in Lebanon to identify changes and trends in their situation. The assessment to provided valuable insight into refugees living conditions, from the size of their families to the shelter they live in, to their economic vulnerability and food insecurity. Throughout this report, refugees own viewpoints offer a crucial glimpse into the strategies they deploy to survive and their own perceptions of their situation and the assistance they receive. A total of 4596 households were surveyed. Since its inception, the VASyR has been an essential process and partnership for shaping planning decisions and programme design. It is the cornerstone for support and intervention in Lebanon. As in previous years, humanitarian agencies have incorporated VASyR findings into their programming and recommendations. The assessment, jointly issued by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Programme (WFP, dataviz.vam.wfp.org), demonstrates that economic vulnerability is, at best, as serious as previous year. Over one third of refugees are moderately to severely food insecure, an increase compared to 2015. Families have exhausted their limited resources, and are having to adapt to survive on the bare minimum. Refugees continue to rely on harmful coping mechanisms to get by.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 20, 2020-June 02, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR conducts Protection Monitoring with partners to analyze trends in the protection environment and situation of refugees in all regions of Lebanon on an ongoing basis. With the outbreak of COVID-19 in Lebanon and the introduction of movement and other restrictions aimed at preventing and containing the spread of the virus, UNHCR and its Protection Monitoring partners Caritas, Intersos and Sheild developed a specific questionnaire to elicit feedback from refugees on the impact of the COVID-19 response on their protection and well-being. The feedback from refugees is used to inform advocacy and programmatic interventions and modes of implementation with the aim of improving refugees' access to protection and essential services, assistance and information.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 21, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 22, 2019-May 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2016, the Vulnerability Assessment of Refugees of Other Nationalities (VARON) has been a key tool for advocacy and program design. The key objectives of the VARON include: • Providing a multi-sectoral update of the situation of refugees from Iraq and other countries in Lebanon through an annual household survey. The survey covers key indicators related to multiple sectors including protection, shelter, water and hygiene, health, livelihoods, socio-economic vulnerability, food security and more. • To enhance the targeting for the provision of multi-purpose cash assistance. The data gathered through the VARON, particularly on expenditure, is used to build econometric models, which are used to determine eligibility for multi-purpose cash and food assistance.