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  • 60+ Downloads
    Updated 12 April 2021 | Dataset date: April 11, 2021-August 11, 2022
    This dataset updates: Never
    Kutupalong Rohingya Refugee Camp, Bangladesh. The structure footprint covers the camps directly affected by the fire of the 22nd March 2021 (Camp 8E, Camp 8W and Camp 9). The footprint is based on high resolution drone imagery from March 2020 (IOM) and has been processed by REACH/UNOSAT. The footprint includes all digitised structures and so includes bridges, shelters and smaller structures, such as latrines etc. This footprint is an early release of the full structure/shelter footprint for all camps and has not been QCed. Users should use accordingly. The full, QCed, post-processed structure/shelter footprint for all camps will be released in mid-April.
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 23 February 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-February 02, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Who is doing What in Azerbaijan: Response activities of Azerbaijan civil society organizations in support of internally displaced persons and other populations affected by the armed conflict of 2020.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 02, 2018-July 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    An estimated 723,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the newly-arrived refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources during the journey. The monsoon season began in May and continues into September, threatening the vast majority of refugees living in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the priority needs of the refugees, a Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), comissioned by UNHCR and with technical support from REACH, was conducted at the household level in 31 refugee sites (3,171 households were surveyed). Translators Without Borders supported in questionnaire translation and enumerator training. This survey identified a number of areas where the basic needs of Rohingya refugees are being met. At the same time, this assessment has identified continuing service gaps in the Rohingya response. For example, the majority of households do not believe there is enough light at night to safely access latrines, and WASH facilities are generally perceived as dangerous areas for girls under age 18. In terms of access to protection services, only a small number of households report members making use of children and women friendly spaces. Despite widespread distribution coverage of key non-food items such as kitchen sets, demand for these items remains high, and refugees are spending the greatest portion of their limited financial resources on basic items including food, clothing and fuel. Findings suggest that there are uncertainties around actions to prepare for cyclones. The mahjis remain almost the sole focal point for communication and complaints with refugees, reflecting their continued prominent position within refugee communities. Finally, the median household debt is twice the median household income for the 30 days prior to data collection, with only two-fifths of households reporting any source of income at all.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 08, 2019-January 26, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    An estimated 738,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state since August 25, 2017. Most of the refugees rely on humanitarian assistance, having left with few possessions and exhausted their financial resources on the journey. The cyclone and monsoon seasons, stretching from May to October, further threatened the living conditions of the vast majority of refugees living who are in makeshift shelters and settlements highly vulnerable to floods and landsides. To understand the evolving priority needs of the refugees, and to understand change over time, this Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (MSNA), coordinated by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and with technical support from REACH, was conducted in 33 refugee sites using a household survey methodology (3,165 households were surveyed). It is a follow up assessment to MSNA I in July 2018. Results of this MSNA are generalizable to the camp level with 95% confidence level and 10% margin of error. Support for questionnaire translation and enumerator language training was provided by Translators Without Borders.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2019-June 24, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee populations to support humanitarian planning and enhance operational and strategic decision-making. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the mid-term review of the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP), with the specific objective of enabling the tracking of JRP 2019 indicators for monitoring and review purposes. A total of 876 households were surveyed across 33 refugee sites. This J-MSNA was funded by UNHCR and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) and comprised of: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 05, 2019-September 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Ensuring adequate and safe shelter for the refugees has been the core part of UNHCR's response in the Rohingya Refugee Crisis Operation from the beginning of influx. Moving forward from emergency shelter kits (ESK) distribution to upgrade shelter kits (USK) distribution, in 2019 UNHCR has initiated a need based targeted shelter repair and replacement assistance to maintain adequate shelter conditions. In line with this approach, condition of the shelters have been assessed in order to identify the individual shelter needs and specific needs of vulnerable families by the technical staff of shelter partners according to criteria and information have been collected through GIS tool. A total of 59,920 shelters were assessed. Based on the outcome of the assessment, most vulnerable shelters have been provided shelter support for Repair and Replacement and less vulnerable shelters are also receiving support for repair and replacement.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: October 02, 2018-November 18, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    From 2 October to 18 November 2018, UNHCR carried out a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sweep assessment on water points, latrines and bathing facilities in 14 refugee camps. These include Kutupalong and Nayapara registered camps, and the Transit Centre. The assessment cover basic information on location, status, quality, the privacy of facilities and issues such as the management of menstrual hygiene and facilities for persons with specific needs. The dataset contains 3 modules: bathing (12,259 obervations), latrine (11,490 observations) and water points (6,767 observations).
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 15, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 21, 2020-February 28, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only Wave1 fot the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: April 17, 2020-May 21, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Monitoring of the Effects of the Economic Deterioration on Refugee Households dataset is a Phone survey of Syrian and non-Syrian households to monitor the changes over time in key areas in the context of the deteriorating economic situation in Lebanon.The UNHCR call center was used to conduct the two waves of data collection: 20-28 February (Wave I) and 17 April-15 May (Wave II). Several call attempts were made at different times of the day to reach the largest possible number of households. After the Wave I of the survey, which was collected before the first case of Covid 19 was reported in Lebanon, the Wave II was conducted to account for the impacts of the spread of the Covid 19 virus on refugees, the level of awarness among them and their accessibility to hygiene items and health care services. This dataset includes only the non-Syrian refugees cases.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 24, 2019-December 19, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR (Cox’s Bazar Field Office) conducted the second round of its WASH Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey from 24th November to 19th December 2019 in UNHCR’s area of operation in Kutupalong and Teknaf. Five WASH partners implemented the survey: NGO Forum, BRAC, OXFAM, Solidarité International and ACF. Preparation began in early November, as UNHCR discussed methodologies with participating agencies. Several meetings focussed on issues such as; staffing for the data collection and financial issues such as ‘per diem’ allowances. Several partner enumerators and their team leaders had no previous experience in KAP surveys, therefore, training modules were developed and implemented by UNHCR WASH staff. The objective of the survey was to better plan and guide future UNHCR WASH interventions implemented through NGO partners.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 25, 2019-December 04, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Maratane Refugee Camp is found in Northern Mozambique, Nampula Province, and is located around 35 kms from the capital city Nampula. The camp was established in February 2001, and since 2003, it has become the only reception center and official settlement in Mozambique, where asylum seekers and refugees can be registered and assisted. Currently, Maratane Refugee camp hosts approximately 9,242 refugees, which are mainly from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Rwanda, Somalia and other nationalities. Maratane Camp is the only refugee camp in the country and is managed by the Instituto Nacional de Apoio aos Refugiados (INAR). INAR is UNHCR's main government counterpart, and operates under the jurisdiction of the Ministry for Internal Affairs. INAR is divided into several units, including Protection/RSD, program, Registration and Logistics and is also UNHCR WASH partner for providing WASH service in the camp. In order to understand the current status and level of WASH service in the camp, UNHCR had conducted a WASH KAP (Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices) survey through coordination with INAR. Accordingly, a total of 433 households from different zones of the camp were interviewed using UNHCR's standard WASH KAP survey questionnaire which was pre-tested and adapted to local context.
  • 80+ Downloads
    Updated 14 December 2020 | Dataset date: December 08, 2020-December 08, 2020
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Shelter Cluster 4W report (Who does What, Where, and When) for typhoon Goni (Rolly) and Vamco (Ulysses) in the Philippines
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 3 December 2020 | Dataset date: October 05, 2017-October 05, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every week
    This dataset contains distribution tracking data for water, food, NFIs and shelter items in Dominica in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. The coordination team in Dominica has been working with partners to make the data as accurate as possible. Please share your distribution to any locations directly to the available dataset created by the team in Dominica or send your information or queries to hurricanemaria2017@undac.org
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 6 January 2020 | Dataset date: December 25, 2019-December 27, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Findings presented in this data set are based on data collected by REACH as part of a rapid camps and sites assessment to provide insight on: How many new IDP arrivals are arriving to camps, informal settlements, collective centres, or transit reception centres reported at the site level since Dec. 18th Movement intentions of the new IDP arrivals in the coming two weeks Identify priority needed items by sector of the new IDP arrivals. Data was collected in 150 communities across eight sub-districts in Northern Idleb and Western Aleppo from 25 to 27 December 2019 through REACH enumerators who surveyed one Key Informant (KI) per community on internally displaced persons' (IDPs) camps and sites nearest to their community. In order to qualify as camp or site, a site had to have 5 or more IDP households living on its premises. 1,253 camps and sites were assessed across 150 communities. IDP numbers solely represent newly arrived IDPs (5 or more HH) to planned camps, informal settlements, collective centres, and transit reception centres, and do not account for total camp or site IDP populations or IDPs within the host communities. The definition of IDPs used by enumerators for this assessment was ‘Individuals or groups of people who have been forced to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as a result of or in order to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalised violence, violations of human rights, or natural or man-made disasters, and who have not crossed an international border'. The definition of planned camp was 'A planned camp is a place where IPDs find accomodation on purpose-built sites, where service infrastructure is provided and distribution take place. The camp is established by an accountable humanitarian actor and to the extent possible, meet the minimum SPHERE standards'. The definition of informal settlements was 'Otherwise known as a self-settled camp or a spontaneous site, hosting 5 or more IDP households. IDPs may settle in a camp that is independent of assistance from the government or humanitarian community. They are a group of tented, or other types of housing units, or unfinished buildings established by IDPs themselves or by non-experienced actors, often erected on land that the occupants have no legal claim to. IDPs intend to stay in this location for an extended period of time. At the moment, most of the so-called IDP camps in Syria fall under this category. ' The definition of collective centres was 'A pre-existing building or other structure used to host 5 or more IDP households, e.g. public buildings, schools, mosques, private collective building' The definition of transit reception centres was 'Otherwise known as transit camps, they provide temporary accomodation for displaced persons pending transfer to a suitable, safe, longer term camp, or at the end of an operation as a staging point of return. Reception/transit centres are usually either intermediate or short-term installations. These sites are often established during extremely large displacements.' Information should be considered as reflective of the situation at the time of data collection, given the dynamic situation in the region. In addition, information should be considered as indicative, and not representative, of the situation.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: April 04, 2018-April 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    This dataset comprises of 644 facilities that were classified as not exposed to a flood or landslide hazard within the 21 Kutupalong Refugee Camps to assess which facilities would be optimal for further shelter upgrades and reinforcement. An index was created for prioritization and of these 644 sites, 224 were identified as having optimal indicators for further site visits. Corresponding maps for these 224 sites can be found on the REACH Resource Centre or ReliefWeb. It should be noted that ALL 644 facilities not exposed to a flood or landslide hazard should be explored as viable options for awareness raising to the local Camp/Majhee populations. For further information regarding the indicators used for the analysis please see the caveats section below.
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 31, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    On the 26th of October 2015, a large scale earthquake caused shelter damage throughout much of northern and central Afghanistan. During August 2016, the REACH Initiative (supported by ACTED, AfghanAid and People in Need) conducted a shelter response evaluation in 3 districts of Afghanistan on behalf of the Shelter Cluster. The aim of the assessment was to evaluate shelter interventions and locate possible intervention gaps in order to inform the shelter cluster of Afghanistan of the current shelter context and needs of earthquake affected families. The assessment consisted of three specific areas of investigation: 1. To monitor change in sheltering conditions for families 2. To evaluate the value of various shelter interventions in allowing families to recover and to identify possible gaps 3. To determine recovery limitations and successes relating to vulnerable groups
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: June 11, 2018-June 11, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    Rapid needs assessment conducted across 255 communities in Idleb Governorate and surrounding opposition held areas in north western Hama, and western Aleppo. Dataset includes demographics, IDP movement intentions, and sectoral information for shelter, food security, livelihoods, electricity and NFIs, WASH, Health, Education, and Protection. Data was collected from May 24th to the 31st.
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 17, 2016-September 19, 2016
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    This dataset provides the clean data from round VI of the Quarterly IDP Camp Profiling exercise in Iraq, conducted in August-September 2016. The exercise was conducted by REACH and the CCCM Cluster Iraq. Findings are based on a total of 4,097 household interviews, and provide statistically representative data about the humanitarian situation and needs of the population of 48 formal IDP camps across Iraq.
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: February 26, 2019-February 26, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Since the end of January 2019, southern Idleb and northern Hama governorates have seen a significant escalation of conflict. Shelling and airstrikes intensified in the area, leading to a deterioration of the humanitarian situation. In response, REACH conducted a rapid needs assessment to provide actors with an update on the humanitarian situation. The latest conflict escalation affects an area that is home to an estimated 700,000 residents and internally displaced persons (IDPs), increasing vulnerability, and in some cases, leading to secondary and tertiary displacements. From late 2017, the region has witnessed a large-scale influx of IDPs, following escalations of conflict and displacements from formerly opposition-held areas in south-east Idleb, south-west Aleppo, Rural Damascus, Homs, Hama, Dar’a and Quneitra governorates. The increase in IDP population in Idleb governorate and surrounding areas has led to a growing strain on resources and an increase in inter-communal tensions in the region. Further complicating the situation, there has been increasing concern regarding a potential military offensive in the region since September 2018, with shelling and airstrikes occurring with increased frequency. While the mid-September 2018 announcement of a demilitarised zone put a pause on concerns over an imminent military offensive in the region, clashes have continued unabated. Data for this assessment was collected from 25-26 February 2019 in 85 opposition-controlled communities in 12 sub-districts via community-level key informant (KI) interviews. KIs were asked to report on the previous week (18 to 25 February). This dataset provides the findings for indicators on demographics, shelter, food, livelihoods, electricity & NFIs, WASH, health, education, protection, reported priority needs, and reported movement intentions.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 28 December 2018 | Dataset date: October 01, 2018-October 01, 2018
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IMU of the ACU, issues its fourth edition of the “Winter Needs in the Northern Syrian Camps” report, addressing 234 camps in the governorates of Aleppo and Idleb. The report brings to light the most important items that IDPs are in need for in terms of type and quantities, according to international standards for humanitarian response. It furthermore, brings emphasis to bear on the course of action that IDPs, as well as the camp management teams, should follow to drive down the effects of natural disasters that may put their lives at risk. Noting that the number of families that ACU enumerators were able to assess their needs reached 46,145 families, making up an overall individual number of 252,052 IDPs
  • 900+ Downloads
    Updated 11 September 2018 | Dataset date: May 16, 2016-May 16, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    4W of the Ecuador Response as of 16th May 2016, compiled by OCHA featuring 4W inputs from: WASH, Food Security, Education, Protection, CCCM, Shelter, Logistics, Early Recovery sectors.
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated 21 July 2018 | Dataset date: July 21, 2018-July 21, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Dataset covers Shelter and Non-food Items needs severity mapping by Local Government Area (LGA) as of June 2018. Dataset covers Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, the three crisis-affected states; Shelter needs severity mapping by Local Government Area (LGA) as of June 2018. Dataset covers Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, the three crisis-affected states; Non-food Items needs severity mapping by Local Government Area (LGA) as of June 2018. The zipped shapefile covers Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, the three crisis-affected states; and a CSV dataset containing Shelter and Non-food Items (NFI) needs severity mapping combined, by Local Government Area (LGA) as of June 2018, covering the three crisis-affected states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa.
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated 21 July 2018 | Dataset date: July 21, 2018-July 21, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    North East Nigeria Camp Management partner operational presence by Local Government Area or LGA (Admin 2). Dataset covers partner operational presence in the three crisis-affected states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, up to LGA level; Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) coverage by Local Government Area or LGA (Admin 2). Includes number of households covered and not covered; total households and individuals covered, percentage and overall coverage in the three crisis-affected states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa, up to LGA level; Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) and Emergency Shelter and Non-Food Items (ESNFI) activity coverage up to Local Government Area or LGA (Admin 2) level in the three crisis-affected states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa. Also includes Camp Management partner operational presence by LGA, as of June 2018.