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  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: August 04, 2021-September 28, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Violent extremism carried out by the Boko Haram group in Nigeria and government measures to contain it have led to intense population movement and human suffering in the Lake Chad basin. Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad are particularly affected. Since 2014, the number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in the Far North region of Cameroon has steadily increased due to attacks by armed groups, in particular Boko Haram and rival groups. The situation of IDPs is worrying for the authorities. In 2019, new waves of conflict and violence, associated with flooding, triggered more internal displacement. As of October 2021, the Far North region had 341,535 IDPs and 124,310 returnees (IOM DTM Round 22). In order to ensure the protection of IDPs in the three departments most affected in the Far North (Mayo-Sava, Mayo-Tsanaga et Logone-Et-Chari), a need was expressed by the different actors in the region and the authorities for credible detailed statistics on the IDP households and individuals that could be used for planning purposes. In this light, UNHCR supported the authorities in undertaking an IDP pilot profiling exercise between July and September 2021 in Mayo-Tsanaga. The profiling collected data on a number of topics that could be used to assess the needs of the IDP population and identify solutions, namely living conditions, food security, essential items and legal protection. The profiling was carried out by UNHCR and the Comité Mixte de Protection which composed mainly of public service agents in the department of Mayo-Tsanaga. The profiling covered 85,908 IDPs in 17,572 households in 201 sites and villages. These data are an anonymized sample of the original data, and include two tables from two questionnaires: one at the household level and one at the individuals household member level.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2017-August 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    This dataset covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 232 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2017 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between December 2017 and August 2018, and were performed by teams composed by at least two members, one from the Shelter team and one from the Protection unit. The monitored sample covers all five UNHCR offices in the field (Mariupol, Sloviansk and Severodonetsk in Government Controlled Areas (GCA); Donetsk and Luhansk in non Government Controlled Areas (NGCA)). The 232 monitoring visits included in the report represent 13% of the 1.732 repairs conducted in 2017 by UNHCR. The number of monitoring visits conducted corresponds to approximately one-third of the target recommended by the SOPs (607 visits, or 35% of the total number of repairs). The monitoring of 2017 shelter activities confirms that shelter assistance - in terms of repair of houses damaged by conflict-related activities - is highly appreciated by the recipients and is generally executed with good quality. The consistent quality is related to the fact that it is easy to find construction companies and brigades with sufficient expertise, and the technology involved is basic and repetitive.
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: September 03, 2018-March 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 464 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2018 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between September 2018 and March 2019, and were performed by teams composed of at least two members, one from the shelter team and one from the protection unit. The monitored sample covers repairs completed in the geographic areas of all five UNHCR offices in eastern Ukraine (Mariupol, Sloviansk and Sievierodonetsk in government-controlled areas [GCA]; Donetsk and Luhansk in non-government-controlled areas [NGCA]). The 464 monitoring visits on which this report is based represent 34% of the 1,374 repairs conducted in 2018 by UNHCR: a significant improvement compared to the 13% covered in the 2017 shelter monitoring exercise (232 visits out of 1,732 repairs conducted). The monitoring of 2018 shelter activities confirms the main findings of the 2017 campaign: the repair of houses damaged by conflict-related incidents is still highly appreciated by recipients (95% of respondents, compared to 97% in 2017) and is executed with good quality (99% of cases, compared to 100% in 2017).
  • Updated 31 January 2022 | Dataset date: October 03, 2019-April 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    This report covers the finding of the post-execution monitoring of 433 houses repaired by UNHCR in the frame of the 2019 shelter programme in the east of Ukraine. The monitoring visits took place between October 2019 and April 2020, and were performed by teams composed of at least two members, one from the shelter team and one from the protection unit. The form has two main sections, one focusing on technical aspects, the other on protection. A few changes to the questionnaire were introduced in 2019, mainly to capture the feedback on cash based interventions; all changes, though, comply with the principle of preserving the comparability of data and findings across the implementation years. The monitored sample covers repairs completed in the geographic areas of four of the five UNHCR offices in eastern Ukraine: Mariupol, Sloviansk and Sievierodonetsk in governmentcontrolled areas (GCA); and Donetsk in non government-controlled areas (NGCA). Last year, Luhansk office in NGCA was not allowed to implement field visits and therefore could not contribute to the 20192 monitoring exercise. The 433 monitoring visits on which this report is based represent 33 per cent of the 1,316 repairs conducted in 2019 by UNHCR, in line with last year’s already satisfactory achievement.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 2 November 2021 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 01, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IMU of the ACU, issues its fourth edition of the “Winter Needs in the Northern Syrian Camps” report, addressing 680 camps in the governorates of Aleppo and Idleb. The report brings to light the most important items that IDPs are in need for in terms of type and quantities, according to international standards for humanitarian response. It furthermore, brings emphasis to bear on the course of action that IDPs, as well as the camp management teams, should follow to drive down the effects of natural disasters that may put their lives at risk. Noting that the number of families that ACU enumerators were able to assess their needs reached 156,873 families, making up an overall individual number of 872,082 IDPs
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 13 September 2021 | Dataset date: August 31, 2021-August 17, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The IRC responds to emergencies (drought, floods, disease outbreaks, and conflict displacement) through its dedicated Emergency Rapid Response (ERR) Unit, which was established in 2005. Through two IRC-led multi-sector emergency response mechanisms—the Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM) funded by USAID and the Emergency Response Mechanism (ERM) funded by ECHO— the ERR unit executes coordinated, rapid, and effective responses to emergencies through¬out Ethiopia immediately as they occur, either directly or through sub-awards other agencies. IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between Donors (OFDA/USAID, ECHO, & others) IRC, and implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provides information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2021. The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation, Sector Donors Fields) for IRC Ethiopia for All Funded Emergency Responses as of 30 August 2021.
  • 60+ Downloads
    Updated 9 September 2021 | Dataset date: August 31, 2021-August 17, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The IRC responds to emergencies (drought, floods, disease outbreaks, and conflict displacement) through its dedicated Emergency Rapid Response (ERR) Unit, which was established in 2005. Through two IRC-led multi-sector emergency response mechanisms—the Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM) funded by USAID and the Emergency Response Mechanism (ERM) funded by ECHO— the ERR unit executes coordinated, rapid, and effective responses to emergencies through out Ethiopia immediately as they occur, either directly or through sub-awards other agencies. IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between IRC; Donors (OFDA/USAID, ECHO, & others); and implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2021.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia OFDA Funded Emergency Responses as of 31 August 2021.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 9 September 2021 | Dataset date: August 31, 2021-August 17, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The IRC responds to emergencies (drought, floods, disease outbreaks, and conflict displacement) through its dedicated Emergency Rapid Response (ERR) Unit, which was established in 2005. Through two IRC-led multi-sector emergency response mechanisms—the Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM) funded by USAID and the Emergency Response Mechanism (ERM) funded by ECHO— the ERR unit executes coordinated, rapid, and effective responses to emergencies through out Ethiopia immediately as they occur, either directly or through sub-awards other agencies. IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to produces relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between IRC; Donors (OFDA/USAID, ECHO, & others); and implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2021.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia ECHO Funded Emergency Responses as of 31 August 2021.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: July 29, 2021-August 11, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR uses Post Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. Usually the surveys that form the basis of the assessment are conducted soon after the distribution of relief items is completed. Four PDMs on Non-Food Items (NFI) have been conducted since 2018. One in March 2018 covering the period from the beginning of the refugee influx in August/September 2017, and the second one in August 2018 covering distributions made during the monsoon season that year. A third PDM exercise covered the period from September 2018 up to March 2019. And a fourth one in November 2019 covered the period from April to November 2019. The current PDM survey and recommendations cover the period from November 2019 up to July 2020. This PDM exercise was initially planned in April 2020, however, it was delayed due to the lockdown imposed at the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 1,166 households that had received NFIs from UNHCR took part in this PDM exercise. The findings from this report will be used in improving further upcoming distributions in 2020 and take into consideration lessons learned from COVID-19's impact on the distribution process. This fifth PDM survey and exercise covers the distribution of six types of NFI assistance provided through UNHCR and its partners in 2020. It includes Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)5, Core Relief Item kits (CRI)6, WASH Hygiene kits7, Compressed Rice Husks (CRH)8 and shelter repair and replacement assistance9
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: October 21, 2019-December 18, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 500,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites (about 40% of the total refugees in Kenya), and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey replicates the preceding Kalobeyei SES (2018), designed to address these shortcomings and support the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data was collected in October 2019 to December 2019, covering about 2,122 households.
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 23 February 2021 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-February 02, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Who is doing What in Azerbaijan: Response activities of Azerbaijan civil society organizations in support of internally displaced persons and other populations affected by the armed conflict of 2020.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 01, 2018-July 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR requested REACH to facilitate a JMSNA, with support from ECHO with the objective of establishing a comprehensive evidence-base of multi-sectoral needs among refugee and host community populations across all existing refugee settlements nationwide (30) and the districts hosting these settlements (11). The report also incorporates findings on needs among refugee and host community populations living in vulnerable urban neighbourhoods of Kampala. The findings and analysis from this report has been used to support the Refugee Response Plan for 2019-2020, along with informing other programmatic, strategic, and operational decision making for the humanitarian response coordinators and partner organisations. The JMSNA aims to compare humanitarian needs across population groups and locations in order to highlight groups and areas of most concern. Consequently, it aims to answer the following research question: what is the situation for specific population groups (refugees residing within refugee settlements and host community populations) in Uganda regarding health and nutrition; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH); livelihoods, environment and energy; shelter, site planning, and non-food items; education; and food security. The JMSNA process in Uganda began in February 2018, with REACH facilitating the research design under the auspices of UNHCR and Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister (OPM). Through the inter-agency coordination group and other coordination mechanisms, a collaborative tool was developed with input from many partners. Data collection was conducted from 2 April to 14 July, 2018, in all 30 refugee settlements. Data collection was carried out in Kampala from 6 to 16 March and 28 March to 9 April to assess the needs of refugee and host community households in vulnerable urban neighbourhoods of Kampala. Project URL: https://www.reachresourcecentre.info/country/uganda/theme/multi-sector-assessments/cycle/1252/#cycle-1252
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 22, 2018-January 17, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 470,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites, and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey was designed to address these shortcomings and support the settlement's development framework, as well as the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data were collected in November 2018 to January 2019, covering about 6004 households.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 28, 2020-August 13, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000.1 The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average.2 As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessments (J-MSNA) was conducted in the host community to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi-sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
  • 50+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 27, 2020-August 12, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000. The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average. As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee communities to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 3 December 2020 | Dataset date: October 05, 2017-October 05, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every week
    This dataset contains distribution tracking data for water, food, NFIs and shelter items in Dominica in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. The coordination team in Dominica has been working with partners to make the data as accurate as possible. Please share your distribution to any locations directly to the available dataset created by the team in Dominica or send your information or queries to hurricanemaria2017@undac.org
  • 70+ Downloads
    Updated 3 August 2020 | Dataset date: June 30, 2020-June 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every month
    IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between OFDA, IRC, and other implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide OFDA/Ethiopia with the information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2019.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia ECHO Funded Emergency Responses as of 30 June 2020 overlaid on Hotspot Woredas in the the nation as of January 2020.
  • 70+ Downloads
    Updated 3 August 2020 | Dataset date: June 30, 2020-June 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every month
    IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between OFDA, IRC, and other implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide OFDA/Ethiopia with the information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2019.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia ECHO Funded Emergency Responses as of 30 June 2020.
  • 90+ Downloads
    Updated 3 August 2020 | Dataset date: June 30, 2020-June 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every month
    IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between OFDA, IRC, and other implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide OFDA/Ethiopia with the information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2017. The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia OFDA Funded RRM Emergency Responses as of 30 June 2020.
  • 7100+ Downloads
    Updated 6 April 2020 | Dataset date: August 20, 2018-August 20, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Market Monitoring monthly dataset with Survival Minimum Expenditure Basket (SMEB) prices. To inform humanitarian actors’ cash and voucher programming, REACH and the Cash-Based Responses Technical Working Group (CBR–TWG) conduct monthly monitoring of key markets throughout Syria to assess the availability and affordability of basic commodities (Market Monitoring Exercise).
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 2 April 2020 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every year
    This dataset is produced by the United Nations for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in collaboration with humanitarian partners in Sudan. This dataset contains the total number of people reached per locality and per sector in Sudan for 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan. The original data is available on https://hpc.tools.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 31, 2017-August 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every month
    IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between OFDA, IRC, and other implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide OFDA/Ethiopia with the information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2017.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia OFDA Funded Emergency Responses as of 31 August 2017
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: June 30, 2018-June 30, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    IRC’s GIS unit created this database to allow for a more sustained approach to producing relevant mapping products and geospatial analysis for regions undergoing emergencies, and will fill gaps in information sharing and management between OFDA, IRC, and other implementing partners during emergency response. IRC’s GIS services provide OFDA/Ethiopia with the information and analysis required to monitor the evolution of project / program results and to track project and program impacts across implementing agencies and geographic locations. This dataset contains boundaries of Ethiopian administrative Woredas which are roughly consistent with the actual administrative boundaries for the year 2017.The Woreda boundary contains attribute data (implementing Partners, Situation and Sector Fields) for IRC Ethiopia OFDA Funded Emergency Responses as of 30 June 2018.
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: July 02, 2018-July 12, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every week
    Due to the emergency situation in Southern Syria, REACH and its partners are conducting a Rapid Market Monitoring exercise that will take place on a weekly basis. The first round of data collection was from July 2nd to July 3rd 2018, and a follow up round July 10th to July 11th. In addition to data collection of SMEB components, the dataset also includes information on community supply route dynamics during the rapidly changing situation