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  • 2200+ Downloads
    Updated 5 August 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2021-April 09, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    A village assessment survey (VAS) is a sub-component of mobility tracking. It collects data on returning IDPs, IDPs, returned migrants and host community members. VAS evaluates the absorption capacity of villages to receive returning IDPs with a focus on accessibility of services, livelihoods and reintegration.
  • 600+ Downloads
    Updated 3 August 2022 | Dataset date: March 02, 2018-April 18, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The dataset contains number of people displaced and returnees at village level in South Kivu province. The dataset also contains needs of the displaced and returned people, reason and time of displacement.
  • 600+ Downloads
    Updated 3 August 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2018-April 25, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The data collection exercise conducted in the villages of Aru, Djugu, Irumu, Mahagi and Mambasa territories. It contains number of IDPs, returnees and theri needs.
  • Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Kenya hosts over half a million refugees, who, along with their hosts in urban and camp areas, face difficult living conditions and limited socioeconomic opportunities. Most refugees in Kenya live in camps located in the impoverished counties of Turkana (40 percent) and Garissa (44 percent), while 16 percent inhabit urban areas—mainly in Nairobi but also in Mombasa and Nakuru. Refugees in Kenya are not systematically included in national surveys, creating a lack of comparable socioeconomic data on camp-based and urban refugees, and their hosts. As the third of a series of surveys focusing on closing this gap, this Socioeconomic Survey of Urban Refugees's aim is to understand the socioeconomic needs of urban refugees in Kenya, especially in the face of ongoing conflicts, environmental hazards, and others shocks, as well as the recent government announcement to close Kenya’s refugee camps, which highlights the potential move of refugees from camps into urban settings The SESs are representative of urban refugees and camp-based refugees in Turkana County. For the Kalobeyei 2018 and Urban 2020–21 SESs, households were randomly selected from the UNHCR registration database (proGres), while a complete list of dwellings, obtained from UNHCR’s dwelling mapping exercise, was used to draw the sample for the Kakuma 2019 SES. The Kalobeyei SES and Kakuma SES were done via Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI). Due to COVID-19 social distancing measures, the Urban SES was collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). The Kalobeyei SES covers 6,004 households; the Kakuma SES covers 2,127 households; and the Urban SES covers 2,438 households in Nairobi, Nakuru, and Mombasa. Questionnaires are aligned with national household survey instruments, while additional modules are added to explore refugee-specific dynamics. The SES includes modules on demographics, household characteristics, assets, employment, education, consumption, and expenditure, which are aligned with the Kenya Integrated Household Budget Survey (KIHBS) 2015–16 and the recent Kenya Continuous Household Survey (KCHS) 2019. Additional modules on access to services, vulnerabilities, social cohesion, mechanisms for coping with lack of food, displacement trajectories, and durable solutions are administered to capture refugee-specific challenges.
  • Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: March 01, 2022-July 07, 2022
    This dataset updates: Never
    Registration in Uganda is carried out by the Government of Uganda through the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) with support from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). In October 2021, OPM and UNHCR commenced a joint verification and individual profiling exercise (IPE) targeting 1,549,181 refugees and asylum seekers consisting of 388,989 households residing in all settlements and urban areas in Uganda. The main population groups are the South Sudanese (61%), Congolese (29%), Burundi (3%), Somali (3%) and the remaining 3% being refugees and asylum seekers from 27 different countries. The exercise is expected to be completed by end of October 2022. The exercise aims to verify the refugee population in Uganda, issue new generation refugee documents (QR compatible) and assess the social economic profiles of refugee households through Individual profiling. Verification will be combined with individual profiling using a desk bound assessment questionnaire, with validation of profiling data through sampling by making home visits. 10% of the verified households will be sampled based on strata covering settlement, country of origin, ethnicity, household with persons with special needs, family composition and year of arrival. By mid July 2022, verification/individual profiling was complete in 6 priority settlements (Imvepi, Kyaka II, Kyangwali, Nakivale, Oruchinga and Rwamwanja) with 9,480 home visits undertaken.
  • 6600+ Downloads
    Updated 18 July 2022 | Dataset date: September 02, 2020-August 15, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The Syrian IDP camps monitoring interactive study is issued by the IMU of the ACU on a monthly basis, to monitor the humanitarian situation of 231 IDp camps in Idleb and Aleppo governorates in Syria’s northwest, shedding light on the needs of the IDPs and the services provided in the camps in the following sectors: Population statistics, WASH, Health, Education, FSL, Shelter and NFI, in addition to the priority needs of IDPs. The study also includes statistics of those who arrive at and leave the camps and the important incidents which took place during the month of the data collection.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: February 20, 2021-March 04, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Following the influx of refugee-returnees from Pakistan and Iran in 2016, UNHCR has been supporting the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan's (GoIRA) Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MoRR) through a series of programmes aimed at providing durable solutions for returnees and long-term displaced populations in Afghanistan. 20 locations were identified by UNHCR and GoIRA as Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR locations). In these locations, large populations of refugee-returnees, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and host communities live together. Within these PARR locations, UNHCR implemented its short and medium-term Community-based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (CO-PROSPER) programmes to promote long-term development initiatives. UNHCR aimed to develop an area-based, humanitarian-development-peace triple nexus response to support durable solutions and create conducive conditions for the sustainable reintegration of displaced persons. To understand the impact of these programmes on the PARR locations, IMPACT Initiatives (IMPACT) conducted an evaluation of the impact of the programmes in PARR locations across four different dimensions: 1) community leadership inclusivity, 2) strengthening public services and equitable access, 3) income generation and economic empowerment, and 4) peacebuilding, and created indices to measure progress over these four key objectives that can be compared against the programme goals. In order to conduct this assessment, a mixed-method approach was used with two structured tools with separate methodologies to assess each site as follows. A HH level tool was used to interview a representative sample of HHs in each of the 20 PARR locations, with a 95% confidence level and a 10% margin of error. While aggregated (to the overall HH level) results are representative by population group (IDPs, refugee-returnees, and host communities) and by location, findings per population group in the locations are indicative only. Household data collection took place from 20 February to 4 March 2021. A total of 2,039 households in representing a total population of 1,347,207 people (approximately 192,458 households) across 20 PARR locations were interviewed.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 22, 2021-December 05, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2017, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting durable solutions aimed at returns and reintegration through its Community based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (Co-PROSPER) in Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR). Initially supporting 1,347,207 individuals in 20 PARR locations in 11 provinces, in 2021, the programme was then further expanded in December 2021 to an additional 1,423,775 individuals in another 20 PARR locations in 19 provinces. In order to establish a baseline for the population prior to intervention, IMPACT conducted a Socio-Economic Vulnerability Assessment (SEVA) of the 20 locations. Between 22 November and 5 December 2021, IMPACT interviewed 2,031 households in each of the 20 new PARR locations on household vulnerabilities, community leadership inclusivity, service quality and access, livelihoods and economic outlook, and community relations and stability. The following preliminary findings note shares the key findings from the assessment, to provide an understanding of the overall level of integration of households living in the new PARRs
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 07, 2019-October 24, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: April 14, 2020-June 04, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-January 18, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: August 08, 2021-November 20, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: February 18, 2021-April 28, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a winterization distribution.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: April 15, 2020-June 08, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a winterization distribution.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2020-January 26, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a distribution of education grants
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 18, 2020-November 17, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Most refugees live in environments where they have access to markets and services in the same way that local communities do. Providing refugees with cash enables them to fulfil their needs in a dignified manner and contributes to the local economy. UNHCR uses cash-based interventions (CBI) to provide protection, assistance, and services to the most vulnerable. Cash and vouchers help the displaced meet a variety of needs, including access to food, water, healthcare, shelter, that allow them to build and support livelihoods, and to facilitate voluntary repatriation. Refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced and other vulnerable populations receive cash assistance through collaborative cash systems in which UNHCR works in close partnership with governments, the private sector, UN agencies, community-based and local partners and development actors. UNHCR started a corporate Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) process to review the use and effectiveness of cash assistance provided by UNHCR and its partners. PDM semi-standardized questionnaires assess the adequacy of cash programmes, and results inform programme changes at the country level in order to improve CBI design and delivery. This survey regards a distribution of grants given to support the Covid-19 response.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: August 03, 2021-August 25, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    In the last quarter of 2021, a full-fledged participatory assessment exercise was successfully organized by UNHCR and conducted through 17 UNHCR protection partners in all the 14 Syrian governorates. With the participation of almost 9,000 internally displaced people, returnees and host communities. The dataset is a consolidation of approximately 870 focus group discussions conducted.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 17, 2021-January 19, 2022
    This dataset updates: Never
    In July-August 2021, a participatory assessment was conducted to map the protection gaps and challenges faced by refugees and asylum-seekers in Syria. The assessment was conducted mainly through 80 focus group discussions (FGDs) that were conducted in 11 Governorates with the participation of 712 PoCs. The FDGs were conducted in areas with the largest refugee and asylum-seeker populations. The main areas included Damascus / Rural Damascus (26 FGDs), Hassakeh (18 FDGs) and Aleppo (12 FDGs). During the discussions, refugees and asylum seekers identified various protection challenges and made recommendations to UNHCR.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: September 07, 2021-September 20, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Until May 2021 all registered refugees in Rwanda received food assistance. Against the background of ever-limited resources and recognizing that the refugee population is not homogeneously vulnerable, in mid-2021 WFP and UNHCR initiated the shift to the targeted provision of food assistance based on needs. A targeting strategy – developed by UNHCR and WFP with support from the Joint UNHCR-WFP Programme Excellence and Targeting Hub - was formulated with the following objectives: - Identify vulnerable refugee households in need of humanitarian assistance and less vulnerable refugees with higher livelihood resilience who would benefit from livelihoods support; - Ensure the greatest protection outcomes through strong community participation, communications with refugee communities and risk analysis to inform the approach. This second JPDM has served to ensure that the corporate practice of post-distribution monitoring is fulfilled. Additionally, it assessed the extent to which the targeting approach has – over a period of five months between May and September 2021 – achieved the above objectives. Overall vulnerability among refugee households – defined by livelihood resilience, economic capacity and food access - reduced over a period of nine months between December 2020 and September 2021
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 21, 2021-December 13, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 2017, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting durable solutions aimed at returns and reintegration through its Community based Protection and Solutions Programme Response (Co-PROSPER) in Priority Areas of Return and Reintegration (PARR). Initially supporting 1,347,207 individuals in 20 PARR locations in 11 provinces, in 2021, the programme was then further expanded in December 2021 to an additional 1,423,775 individuals in another 20 PARR locations in 19 provinces. In order to establish a baseline for the population prior to intervention, IMPACT conducted a Socio-Economic Vulnerability Assessment (SEVA) of the 20 locations. Between 22 November and 5 December 2021, IMPACT interviewed 2,031 households in each of the 20 new PARR locations on household vulnerabilities, community leadership inclusivity, service quality and access, livelihoods and economic outlook, and community relations and stability. Key Informant (KIs) interviews were conducted to assess community leadership in each of the 20 new PARR locations to provide indicative information on infrastructure, service presence, stakeholder presence, and conditions faced by specific displacement groups in each site. The KI survey also aimed to provide additional information on each site and location to complement HH survey findings. Nine KIs were interviewed in each location (except for two locations where certain population groups were absent).