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  • 600+ Downloads
    Updated October 14, 2019 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2019-Oct 5, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every week
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, earthquakes, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices based on assessments in the field. 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) The information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, IOM, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 1300+ Downloads
    Updated July 10, 2019 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2018-Dec 31, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, drought, earthquakes, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices based on assessments in the field. 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) The information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, IOM, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated June 10, 2019 | Dataset date: May 25, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Database of Global Landslide Catalog from NASA collected from 1970 - 2019. It was generated using news feeds and is mostly capturing rain-induced landslide events. More information on metadata and original update source here: https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/global-landslide-catalog-export
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated April 6, 2019 | Dataset date: Oct 23, 2015
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Deslizamiento de laderas sin probabilidad de ocurrencia regionalizada en Baja California, Baja California Sur, Eje Neovolcánico, Golfo California, Chihuahua, Durango, Golfo Norte, Golfo de México, Pacífico Norte y Pacífico Sur.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated January 14, 2019 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2012-Dec 31, 2012
    This dataset updates: Never
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, extreme winter conditions, flooding, heavy rainfall, landslides & mudflows, and extreme weather (sandstorms, hail, wind, etc) as recorded by OCHA field offices. 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) Afghans, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM.
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated December 31, 2018 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2013-Dec 31, 2013
    This dataset updates: Never
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, extreme winter conditions, flooding, heavy rainfall, landslides & mudflows, and extreme weather (sandstorms, hail, wind, etc) as recorded by OCHA field offices and IOM Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance Database (HADB). 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) Afghans, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated December 26, 2018 | Dataset date: Dec 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Population data (population, household, breakdown by age) at village level (admin 4), with total 1551 villages and the admin code has been adjusted into BPS code. This data is extracted from the latest version 2017 - SIAK database (Population Information Administration System - https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistem_informasi_administrasi_kependudukan) of the Ministry of Home Affairs - MoHA. The data is served as GIS REST Services and is available publicly. Data cleaning and analysis was done by the World Food Programme (WFP)
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated December 26, 2018 | Dataset date: Dec 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Population data (population, household, breakdown by age) at village level (admin 4), with total 2650 villages and the admin code has been adjusted into BPS code. This data is extracted from the latest version 2017 - SIAK database (Population Information Administration System - https://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistem_informasi_administrasi_kependudukan) of the Ministry of Home Affairs - MoHA. The data is served as GIS REST Services and is available publicly. Data cleaning and analysis was done by the World Food Programme (WFP)
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated December 18, 2018 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2015-Dec 31, 2015
    This dataset updates: Never
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches,earthquake, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices and IOM Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance Database (HADB). 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated August 12, 2018 | Dataset date: Oct 15, 2010
    This dataset updates: Never
    This is "Flood vectors - Radarsat-2 (15 October 2010)" of the Land Slide analysis for Pakistan which began on 18 May 2010. It includes 1 satellite detected water bodies with a spatial extent of 12.54 square kilometers derived from the Radarsat-2 image acq...
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated August 12, 2018 | Dataset date: May 31, 2010
    This dataset updates: Never
    This is "Flood vectors - SPOT4 (31 May 2010)" of the Land Slide analysis for Pakistan which began on 18 May 2010. It includes 1 satellite detected water bodies with a spatial extent of 12.03 square kilometers derived from the SPOT4 image acquired on 31 Ma...
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated August 12, 2018 | Dataset date: May 14, 2010
    This dataset updates: Never
    This is "Flood vectors - ASTER (14 May 2010)" of the Land Slide analysis for Pakistan which began on 18 May 2010. It includes 1 satellite detected water bodies with a spatial extent of 6.59 square kilometers derived from the ASTER image acquired on 14 May...
  • This map illustrates satellite-detected landslide and flood water extent in Peshghor village and surrounding areas in Khenj District, Panjshir Province, Afghanistan as seen on Sentinel-2 satellite imagery, 10 m resolution, collected on 13 July 2018, one day after the disaster happened. The landslides and floodwaters hit villages downstream because of the break-up of the natural banks of the dam. As a result, Peshghor and surrounding villages have been cut off and damages have been reported on structures and buildings. Within the current map extent Saricha primary road is potentially affected by the landslides and the overflow of Panjshir River. Around 198 buildings are located within areas affected by the landslide and 9 within areas affected by the floods. Due to the resolution of the satellite imagery, the extent of landslide and floodwaters may be underestimated and as a consequence, the number of buildings potentially affected. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated June 21, 2018 | Dataset date: Apr 13, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    This map illustrates areas potentially affected by the mudflow, extracted from a Pleiades and GeoEye-1 satellite images acquired on the 10 April 2017 over Mocoa city and its outskirts, in Putumayo Department, Colombia. Inside some neighbourhoods of the city of Mocoa, flood waters and mudflow have receded compared with previous analysis performed by UNOSAT using an image from 4 April 2017. The situation as of 10 April 2017 reveals: 22 km of roads seem potentially affected and about 1,300 buildings are within areas which are still experiencing floods and mud flow. It is likely that flood waters and mudflow could have been systematically under or overestimated along highly vegetated areas and within built-up urban areas. This analysis has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR-UNOSAT.
  • 1400+ Downloads
    Updated April 11, 2018 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2017-Dec 31, 2017
    This dataset updates: Every year
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, earthquakes, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices based on assessments in the field. 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) The information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, IOM, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated April 4, 2018 | Dataset date: Apr 4, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    This dataset includes WASH infrastructure (latrines and handpump tubewell) exposure to flood and landslide hazards. Data is from REACH's Round 4 infrastructure mapping for Kutupalong Refugee Camps. Flood analysis was conducted by IOM/UNHCR and landslide analysis by ADPC/UNHCR. For access to media hyperlink files please contact reach.mapping@impact-initiatives.org or the ISCG in CXB.
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated July 16, 2017 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2016-Oct 29, 2016
    This dataset updates: Every year
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches,earthquake, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices and IOM Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance Database (HADB). 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated April 28, 2017 | Dataset date: Apr 12, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Following a large mudflow that hit the city of Mocoa (Department of Putumayo, Colombia) on 31 March 2017 as a consequence of the heavy rains, the International Charter Space and Major Disasters has been activated upon the request of the National Unit for Disaster Risk Management (UNGRD) / Unidad Nacional para la Gestion del Riesgo de Desastres, IDEAM. In response to this emergency, UNITAR-UNOSAT has carried out satellite based damage analysis to assess (visible) building structural damage caused by mudflows. This map illustrates satellite-detected damaged structures including building damage density in Mocoa city and its surroundings. Analysis has been undertaken by using post satellite imagery acquired by Pleiades and Geoeye-1 satellites on the 7 and 10 April 2017 and pre satellite images acquired by Worldview-2 & 1 satellites on the 21 December 2016 and 26 December 2013. As result of UNOSAT satellite analysis, a total of 1,082 buildings were detected as damaged of which 736 observed as destroyed or washed out by mudflow and 346 observed as severely damaged. Due to the pronounced incident angle and cloud cover of the satellite images, UNITAR-UNOSAT has also used orthophotos collected by Corpoamazonia in order to validate satellite based analysis. Orthophotos and additional baseline data were provided by OSM Humanitarian Mapping Unit and UMAIC (Unidad de Manejo y Analisis de Informacion de Colombia) who is also providing information management coordination support for this event. Kindly note that the number of damaged structures could have been underestimated due to the parameters of the images. This analysis has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR-UNOSAT.
  • This map illustrates satellite-detected water bodies and inundated areas in Mocoa city, Putumayo department in Colombia as seen on Resourcesat-2 satellite imagery collected 04 April 2017. Heavy rainfall in the area caused flooding, landslides and mudflow that affected the city. UNOSAT extracted a water index from the satellite image to determine areas of standing water as well as soils with varying levels of water content (i.e. mud). Within the city of Mocoa and the current map extent, about 18 km of roads are potentially affected. About 2900 buildings are within areas which experienced floods and mudflow. It is likely that flood waters and inundation have been systematically underestimated along highly vegetated areas and within built-up urban areas because of the special characteristics of the satellite data used. This analysis has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR /UNOSAT.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated April 27, 2017 | Dataset date: Apr 13, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Posterior al deslizamiento de tierra que sembró el caos en la ciudad de Mocoa (Departamento de Putumayo, Colombia) el 31 de marzo de 2017 como consecuencia de las fuertes lluvias, el International Charter Space & Major Disasters fue activado bajo la petición de la Unidad Nacional para la Gestión del Riesgo de Desastres, IDEAM. En respuesta a la emergencia, UNITAR-UNOSAT ha llevado a cabo análisis visible de daño en las edificaciones causado por el deslizamiento de tierra, usando imágenes satelitales de alta resolución. Este mapa ilustra edificaciones dañadas detectadas en imágenes satelitales y la densidad de daño asociada en la ciudad de Mocoa y sus alrededores. El análisis ha sido conducido utilizando como imágenes post emergencia las adquiridas por los satélites Pleiades y GeoEye-1 el 7 y el 10 de abril de 2017 y como imágenes pre emergencia las adquiridas por los satélites WorldView-2 y WorldView-1 en las fechas del 21 de diciembre de 2016 y 26 de diciembre de 2013. El resultado del análisis conducido por UNOSAT revela un total de 1,082 edificaciones dañadas, de las cuales 736 aparecen como destruidas en la imagen o arrastradas por el deslizamiento de tierra y 346 presentan daño severo. Debido al acusado ángulo y la cobertura de nubes de las imágenes satelitales, UNITAR-UNOSAT ha utilizado orthophotos colectadas por Corpoamazonia como fuente auxiliar de validación del análisis realizado con las imágenes satélites. Las orthophotos y otros datos secundarios fueron provistos por OpenStreetMap & la Unidad de Mapeo Humanitario y UMAIC (Unidad de Manejo y Análisis de Información de Colombia), quienes también han provisto apoyo en la coordinación y gestión de la información durante esta emergencia. Por favor, note que el número de estructuras dañadas ha podido ser infra-estimado como consecuencia de los parámetros de las imágenes satelitales utilizadas. Este es un análisis preliminar que aún no ha sido validado en el terreno. Por favor, envíen sus comentarios a UNITAR-UNOSAT.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated November 24, 2015 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2015-Jun 30, 2015
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, flooding, heavy rainfall & snowfall, and landslides & mudflows as recorded by OCHA field offices and IOM Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance Database (HADB). 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) people, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM. 4) The number of affected people and houses damaged or destroyed are based on the reports received. These figures may change as updates are received.
  • 900+ Downloads
    Updated November 24, 2015 | Dataset date: Apr 25, 2015
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Geodata of landslides from earthquake on 25 April, 2015. East of Dharapani, Manang District, Nepal (50 Kilometers Northwest of Epicenter)
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated November 24, 2015 | Dataset date: Jan 1, 2014-Dec 31, 2014
    This dataset updates: Every year
    1) Natural disaster events include avalanches, extreme winter conditions, flooding, heavy rainfall, landslides & mudflows, and extreme weather (sandstorms, hail, wind, etc) as recorded by OCHA field offices and IOM Afghanistan Humanitarian Assistance Database (HADB). 2) A natural disaster incident is defined as an event that has affected (i.e. impacted) Afghans, who may or may not require humanitarian assistance. 3) HADB information is used as a main reference and supplemented by OCHA Field Office reports for those incidents where information is not available from the HADB. OCHA information includes assessment figures from OCHA, ANDMA, Red Crescent Societies, national NGOs, international NGOs, and ERM.