Refine your search: Clear all
Featured:
Locations:
More
Formats:
More
Organisations:
More
Tags:
More
Licenses:
More
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2019-June 30, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 01, 2018-August 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 60+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: February 01, 2017-June 30, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2017-March 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 50+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: February 01, 2017-June 30, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: March 01, 2017-March 31, 2023
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: April 01, 2017-September 30, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 30+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: January 01, 2017-February 28, 2023
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 60+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: June 01, 2017-June 30, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 01, 2017-May 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2017-March 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: February 01, 2018-August 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 29 July 2022 | Dataset date: July 01, 2019-March 31, 2022
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The IPC Acute Food Insecurity (IPC AFI) classification provides strategically relevant information to decision makers that focuses on short-term objectives to prevent, mitigate or decrease severe food insecurity that threatens lives or livelihoods. This data has been produced by the National IPC Technical Working Groups for IPC population estimates since 2017. All national population figures are based on official country population estimates. IPC estimates are those published in country IPC reports.
  • Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 01, 2020-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Kenya hosts over half a million refugees, who, along with their hosts in urban and camp areas, face difficult living conditions and limited socioeconomic opportunities. Most refugees in Kenya live in camps located in the impoverished counties of Turkana (40 percent) and Garissa (44 percent), while 16 percent inhabit urban areas—mainly in Nairobi but also in Mombasa and Nakuru. Refugees in Kenya are not systematically included in national surveys, creating a lack of comparable socioeconomic data on camp-based and urban refugees, and their hosts. As the third of a series of surveys focusing on closing this gap, this Socioeconomic Survey of Urban Refugees's aim is to understand the socioeconomic needs of urban refugees in Kenya, especially in the face of ongoing conflicts, environmental hazards, and others shocks, as well as the recent government announcement to close Kenya’s refugee camps, which highlights the potential move of refugees from camps into urban settings The SESs are representative of urban refugees and camp-based refugees in Turkana County. For the Kalobeyei 2018 and Urban 2020–21 SESs, households were randomly selected from the UNHCR registration database (proGres), while a complete list of dwellings, obtained from UNHCR’s dwelling mapping exercise, was used to draw the sample for the Kakuma 2019 SES. The Kalobeyei SES and Kakuma SES were done via Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI). Due to COVID-19 social distancing measures, the Urban SES was collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). The Kalobeyei SES covers 6,004 households; the Kakuma SES covers 2,127 households; and the Urban SES covers 2,438 households in Nairobi, Nakuru, and Mombasa. Questionnaires are aligned with national household survey instruments, while additional modules are added to explore refugee-specific dynamics. The SES includes modules on demographics, household characteristics, assets, employment, education, consumption, and expenditure, which are aligned with the Kenya Integrated Household Budget Survey (KIHBS) 2015–16 and the recent Kenya Continuous Household Survey (KCHS) 2019. Additional modules on access to services, vulnerabilities, social cohesion, mechanisms for coping with lack of food, displacement trajectories, and durable solutions are administered to capture refugee-specific challenges.
  • Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: March 01, 2022-July 07, 2022
    This dataset updates: Never
    Registration in Uganda is carried out by the Government of Uganda through the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) with support from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). In October 2021, OPM and UNHCR commenced a joint verification and individual profiling exercise (IPE) targeting 1,549,181 refugees and asylum seekers consisting of 388,989 households residing in all settlements and urban areas in Uganda. The main population groups are the South Sudanese (61%), Congolese (29%), Burundi (3%), Somali (3%) and the remaining 3% being refugees and asylum seekers from 27 different countries. The exercise is expected to be completed by end of October 2022. The exercise aims to verify the refugee population in Uganda, issue new generation refugee documents (QR compatible) and assess the social economic profiles of refugee households through Individual profiling. Verification will be combined with individual profiling using a desk bound assessment questionnaire, with validation of profiling data through sampling by making home visits. 10% of the verified households will be sampled based on strata covering settlement, country of origin, ethnicity, household with persons with special needs, family composition and year of arrival. By mid July 2022, verification/individual profiling was complete in 6 priority settlements (Imvepi, Kyaka II, Kyangwali, Nakivale, Oruchinga and Rwamwanja) with 9,480 home visits undertaken.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 24 July 2022 | Dataset date: January 31, 1995-August 15, 2022
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Somalia Monthly staple food price data collected by FEWS NET since 1995.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: June 27, 2012-July 05, 2012
    This dataset updates: Never
    Dzaleka refugee camp in Malawi has been hosting refugees since 1994, mainly from the Great Lakes Region in Central Africa. Since 2002, WFP in accordance with theMemoradum of Understanding between WFP and UNHCR has been providing food rations to therefugees in the camp. To support informing revisions to the food assistance programme, a UNHCRStandardised Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) was conducted by UNHCR with the support of WFPbetween 27 June and 5 July 2012. This was the fi rst nutrition assessment since 2008. The SENS was based on the Standardised Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions(SMART) methodology and UNHCR SENS Guidelines for Refugee Populations (v 1.3, March 2012).Simple random sampling was used to select a target sample of 504 households and 314 children under5 years. A resultant sample size of 422 households and 365 children was achieved. The microdata arethe anonymized version of the original data, and include a data fi le for the following modules:foodsecurity, mosquito net coverage, WASH, children under 5 years old, infants aged 0 to 23 months andwomen aged 15 to 49 years.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 16, 2013-December 23, 2013
    This dataset updates: Never
    In December 2013 Botswana's Dukwi refugee camp was host to an estimated 3,104 individuals (1,527 households) from 14 countries, mostly Somalia and Namibia. There was an assortment of languages and cultures co-existing in the camp. In December 2013, UNHCR conducted a nutrition survey in the camp with the overall aim to assess the prevalence of malnutrition and to monitor selected indicators of programme performance. The survey was based on the UNHCR Standardised Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) guidelines for refugee populations (v1.3) (see www.sens.unhcr.org) and the Standardized Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions (SMART) methodology (v1). This data is the anonymous version of the data collected for the 2013 survey. See the details on the specific objectives of the survey and survey methods in the report.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 10, 2016-January 24, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health through the National Directorate of Nutrition and Food Technology (DNTA) and operational partners including WFP, UNICEF, IRC, ADES, CSSI and IMC organized a Standardized Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) in seven camps in the south, south-east and west of Chad in order to assess the nutrition and health situation of the refugee populations. The survey took place from 10 December 2016 to 24 January 2017 in the seven refugee camps hosting refugees from Central African Republic, Nigeria and Niger. The survey include two modules (children under 5 and women of child-bearing age) and used two-stage cluster sampling. See more details in the report.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: December 07, 2016-January 22, 2017
    This dataset updates: Never
    Refugees from Sudan started arriving in eastern Chad in 2003 due to the conflict in Darfur. The number of long-term refugees was estimated to be 310,834 people in 2016. The region is mostly desert with few natural resources, in particular land and water. On top of the difficult environment, insecurity has made it a challenge for NGOs and international organizations to provide support to the camps. The refugees in the camps have relied on WFP food assistance since they arrived. In January 2014, the food ration was reduced from the standard 2,100 kcal/day to 800 kcal. As part of nutrition and health monitoring, UNHCR in collaboration with WFP organized a Standardized Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) in the camps in order to assess the nutrition and health situation of the refugee populations, and orient and guide decision-making for the following year. The survey took place from 7 December 2016 to 22 January 2017 in the 12 camps hosting refugees from Sudan in the regions of Ouaddai, Wadi Fira, Ennedi East and Sila (situated on the border with Darfur, Sudan). The survey include two modules (children under 5 and women of child-bearing age) and used two-stage cluster sampling. See more details in the report.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: March 07, 2016-March 28, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    Malawi has been hosting refugees and asylum seekers in Dzaleka camp,Dowa district, since 1994. By 2016 the camp reached a population of 25,202 refugees, most of whomlive in the refugee camp (ProGres database). The refugees are mainly from the Great Lakes Regioncomprising of Democratic Republic of Congo (46%), Burundi (25%) and Rwanda (20%). About 8% of theremaining refugees come from Somalia, Ethiopia and other countries. Dzaleka camp is surrounded by12 villages, and UNHCR Malawi mapped 11 villages with a total population of 37,412 for programmingas host communities. In March of 2016, the Government of Malawi opened Luwani Camp, Neno district, to primarily hostasylum seekers from Mozambique. With a growing population, the camp had nearly 2,200 persons ofconcern to UNHCR in 2016. The camp is surrounded by 6 villages with a total population of 4,614households. UNHCR, the World Food Programme (WFP) and partners worked to ensure that food security andrelated needs of the refugees were adequately addressed in the two camps. The Government of Malawihas responsibility for the host communities through national plans, supported by a variety of NGOpartners. In 2016, there was a great need to monitor the nutrition situation of the refugees in the twocamps as well as the host communities serving the two camps in order inform appropriateinterventions. Thus, four Standardised Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) were conducted in the twocamps and their host communities from 7 to 8 November 2016. This was the fi rst SENS in Luwani campand the host communities. Previous SENS were conducted in Dzaleka camp in 2008, 2012 and 2014. The SENS was based on the Standardised Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions(SMART) methodology and UNHCR SENS Guidelines for Refugee Populations (v 2, 2013). A two-stagecluster sampling was conducted in three of the survey areas (Dzaleka camp, two host communities) andan exhaustive method was used in Luwani camp as the total population was below 2,500. See moredetails in the report. The microdata are the anonymized version of the original data, and include a datafi le for the following modules:food security, mosquito net coverage, WASH, children under 5 years old,and women aged 15 to 49 years.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: November 07, 2021-November 19, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugess (UNHCR) and World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a joint assessment mission (JAM) of Nigerian refugees in the Far North of Cameroon between October 7 and 19, 2021. The objective of the assessment was to collect updated information on basic needs, shelter, food security, nutrition, water and sanitation, education, protection, security, common services, and livelihoods of Nigerian refugees to inform improved humanitarian assistance. Assessment data was collected at three levels: household, children under five and women of child-bearing age. Stratified random sampling was used to collect the data, with two main strata: 1) Nigerian refugees in the Minawao camp and 2) Nigerian refugees outside of camps. The second strata was further divided into strata by department: Diamaré, Logone-et-Chari, Mayo-Sava, Mayo-Tsanaga. Raw survey weights were calculated by dividing the size of the sample frame by the sample size per strata. The published data on the MDL are an anonymous version of the original data.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.
  • Updated 10 July 2022 | Dataset date: October 01, 2021-November 30, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    Protracted and new displacements of large numbers of people as well as complex conflict dynamics continue to be a major issue in Darfur. In 2020, an estimated 2.5 million people were internally displaced and close to 400,000 Darfuris refugees resided in neighbouring countries. The political transition following years of conflict paved the way for the signing of the Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) in 2020. The peace agreement aims to address the root causes of conflict but also establishes durable solutions for displaced populations as a necessity for lasting peace in Darfur. In 2021, the Government furthermore initiated work on a National Strategy on Solutions, which will offer a critical strategic framework and operational roadmap towards solutions for displaced communities in Sudan. In 2017, the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the international community agreed on the need to collectively support Durable Solutions for IDPs, returnees, and their host communities to end the situation of protracted displacement. The collaboration on Durable Solutions between the GoS and international community resulted in two Durable Solution pilots in respectively El Fasher (North Darfur) and Um Dukhun (Central Darfur). JIPS provided technical support for the scale-up of the durable solutions analysis across Darfur under the Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF). Focusing on nine localities, including urban areas, the data collection exercises build directly on the durable solutions analysis approach piloted in El Fasher in 2019. The Durable Solutions Working Group (DSWG) identified a joint evidence base and a collaborative approach as priorities and therefore undertook a joint area-based profiling exercise, focusing on the Abu Shouk and El Salaam IDP camps on the outskirts of El Fasher. The focus was set on profiling of IDPs (in camp settlements and out of camps), IDP returnees, refugee returnees, and non-displaced. The profiling exercises are aimed at: i.Informing CERF programming and Action Plan development in each state/locality; ii.Provide the baseline of the agreed upon CERF outcome/output indicators (for later measurement of impact); and iii.Inform broader UNHCR programming beyond the Fund.