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  • 50+ Downloads
    Updated 26 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 11, 2020-February 28, 2021
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    Ce jeu de données représente les sites fournis par OIM, UNHCR et les ONG qui font des évaluations multi-sectorielles sur le terrain Compilation des données de 2016 à aujourd'hui
  • 3300+ Downloads
    Updated 17 February 2021 | Dataset date: September 02, 2020-September 02, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every month
    The Syrian IDP camps monitoring interactive study is issued by the IMU of the ACU on a monthly basis, to monitor the humanitarian situation of 231 IDp camps in Idleb and Aleppo governorates in Syria’s northwest, shedding light on the needs of the IDPs and the services provided in the camps in the following sectors: Population statistics, WASH, Health, Education, FSL, Shelter and NFI, in addition to the priority needs of IDPs. The study also includes statistics of those who arrive at and leave the camps and the important incidents which took place during the month of the data collection.
  • 1900+ Downloads
    Updated 10 February 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2019-January 31, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    This dataset includes incidents affecting the affecting the protection of IDPs and refugees. The data contains incidents identified in open sources. Categorized by country and with links to relevant Monthly News Brief.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: February 01, 2018-July 14, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    UNHCR requested REACH to facilitate a JMSNA, with support from ECHO with the objective of establishing a comprehensive evidence-base of multi-sectoral needs among refugee and host community populations across all existing refugee settlements nationwide (30) and the districts hosting these settlements (11). The report also incorporates findings on needs among refugee and host community populations living in vulnerable urban neighbourhoods of Kampala. The findings and analysis from this report has been used to support the Refugee Response Plan for 2019-2020, along with informing other programmatic, strategic, and operational decision making for the humanitarian response coordinators and partner organisations. The JMSNA aims to compare humanitarian needs across population groups and locations in order to highlight groups and areas of most concern. Consequently, it aims to answer the following research question: what is the situation for specific population groups (refugees residing within refugee settlements and host community populations) in Uganda regarding health and nutrition; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH); livelihoods, environment and energy; shelter, site planning, and non-food items; education; and food security. The JMSNA process in Uganda began in February 2018, with REACH facilitating the research design under the auspices of UNHCR and Uganda’s Office of the Prime Minister (OPM). Through the inter-agency coordination group and other coordination mechanisms, a collaborative tool was developed with input from many partners. Data collection was conducted from 2 April to 14 July, 2018, in all 30 refugee settlements. Data collection was carried out in Kampala from 6 to 16 March and 28 March to 9 April to assess the needs of refugee and host community households in vulnerable urban neighbourhoods of Kampala. Project URL: https://www.reachresourcecentre.info/country/uganda/theme/multi-sector-assessments/cycle/1252/#cycle-1252
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: November 22, 2018-January 17, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since 1992, Kenya has been a generous host of refugees and asylum seekers, a population which today exceeds 470,000 people. The Kakuma Refugee Camps have long been among the largest hosting sites, and have become even larger in recent years, with an estimated 67 percent of the current refugee population arriving in the past five years. In 2015, UNHCR, the Government of Kenya, and partners established Kalobeyei Settlement, located 40 kilometers north of Kakuma, to reduce the population burden on the other camps and facilitate a shift towards an area-based development model that addresses the longer term prospects of both refugees and the host community. The refugee population makes up a significant share of the local population (an estimated 40 percent at the district level) and economy, engendering both positive and negative impacts on local Kenyans. While Kenya has emerged as a leader in measuring the impacts of forced displacement, refugees are not systematically included in the national household surveys that serve as the primary tools for measuring and monitoring poverty, labor markets and other welfare indicators at a country-wide level. As a result, comparison of poverty and vulnerability between refugees, host communities and nationals remains difficult. Initiated jointly by UNHCR and the World Bank, this survey was designed to address these shortcomings and support the settlement's development framework, as well as the wider global vision laid out by the Global Refugee Compact and the Sustainable Development Goals. Data were collected in November 2018 to January 2019, covering about 6004 households.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 01, 2016-August 31, 2016
    This dataset updates: Never
    In April 2016, following a series of consultations between the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the City Social Welfare and Development Office and other partners in Zamboanga, a profiling exercise for home-based internally displaced persons (IDPs) was conceptualized. The main purpose was to validate the relevance of existing lists and obtain up-to-date information from home-based IDPs who decided to take part in the exercise so that the government, as well as other humanitarian and development actors, can make informed and consultative decisions while designing and targeting their assistance programs, including protection interventions. Following a piloting phase in June 2016, the full-blown profiling was conducted in July-August 2016 and reached 6,474 families from 66 barangays in Zamboanga. Of these, 1,135 families were assessed to be potential home-based IDPs based on the documents they presented. The profiling revealed that most home-based IDPs are living in barangays of Sta. Catalina, Sta. Barbara, Talon-Talon and Rio Hondo.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 28, 2020-August 13, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000.1 The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average.2 As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessments (J-MSNA) was conducted in the host community to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi-sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 27, 2020-August 12, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 860,000.1 The presence of the refugee communities has raised concerns over local environmental degradation, falling wages and rising prices, exerting additional pressures on localities where public services and infrastructure were already lagging behind the national average.2 As the crisis moved beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected host communities is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. Against this background, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee communities to support detailed humanitarian planning and enhance the ability of operational partners to meet the strategic aims of donors and coordinating bodies. To date, a number of MSNAs have been implemented to support the response. The 2020 J-MSNA aims to provide an accurate snapshot of the situation with the specific objectives of (1) providing a comprehensive evidence base of household-level multi sectoral needs to inform the 2021 Joint Response Plan (JRP); (2) providing an analysis of how needs have changed in 2020 with an emphasis on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on multisectoral needs; and (3) providing the basis for a joint multi stakeholder analysis process.
  • 4300+ Downloads
    Updated 26 January 2021 | Dataset date: May 01, 2020-June 30, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The Dataset contains IDPs, returnees at sub national level.
  • Updated 20 January 2021 | Dataset date: January 21, 2021-February 28, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The location of centralized IDP was extracted from geotag photos of IDP in Mamuju
  • 8800+ Downloads
    Updated 20 January 2021 | Dataset date: January 20, 2021-February 28, 2021
    This dataset updates: As needed
    This spatial database contains the outline of the camps, settlements, and sites where Rohingya refugees are staying in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.
  • 3700+ Downloads
    Updated 21 December 2020 | Dataset date: September 01, 2020-October 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    This datasets has IDPs, Household & Returnees data at Admin3 level gathered through DTM Mobility Tracking Assessment. In the context of the political instability that has prevailed since the uprising in Libya (October 2011) and culminated in the collapse of a fragile central authority accompanied by fragmentation and infighting among myriads of militias, with continued fighting since the mid-2014 escalations, estimates indicate that the number of Internally Displaced Per-sons (IDPs) in Libya has exceeded 400,000 individuals, some eight percent of the total population (HNO, September 2015). While the country struggles to achieve and maintain stability, thousands of migrants are also taking journeys to and through Libya in a desperate bid to seek a better life in Europe. These migrants are exposed to risks of being trafficked and exploited while traveling through dangerous routes in deserts and territories controlled by different armed groups, as well as dying during attempts to cross the Mediterranean Sea. However, there has been no standardized mechanism in place to verify and regularly update IDP and migrant numbers. Given that most humanitarian and international organizations operate remotely from Tunis since mid-July 2014 due to the deteriorating security situation, maintaining access to reliable and updated data on the humanitarian situation in Libya has been challenging.
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated 6 November 2020 | Dataset date: January 20, 2020-January 20, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    The dataset contains households and individual number of returnees at village level. The dataset is gender and age dis-aggregated with category of returnees i.e. IDPs or Refugees.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 1 July 2020 | Dataset date: June 17, 2020-June 20, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    The dataset contains number of displaced persons by gender and age dis-aggregated. Dataset contains data on Covid-19, WASH, Shelter and other needs.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 30 March 2020 | Dataset date: February 20, 2020-February 20, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Camps in Sudan for IDP - IOM
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated 26 March 2020 | Dataset date: January 01, 2020-January 01, 2020
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    Turkey Refugee Camps
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 6 January 2020 | Dataset date: December 25, 2019-December 27, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Findings presented in this data set are based on data collected by REACH as part of a rapid camps and sites assessment to provide insight on: How many new IDP arrivals are arriving to camps, informal settlements, collective centres, or transit reception centres reported at the site level since Dec. 18th Movement intentions of the new IDP arrivals in the coming two weeks Identify priority needed items by sector of the new IDP arrivals. Data was collected in 150 communities across eight sub-districts in Northern Idleb and Western Aleppo from 25 to 27 December 2019 through REACH enumerators who surveyed one Key Informant (KI) per community on internally displaced persons' (IDPs) camps and sites nearest to their community. In order to qualify as camp or site, a site had to have 5 or more IDP households living on its premises. 1,253 camps and sites were assessed across 150 communities. IDP numbers solely represent newly arrived IDPs (5 or more HH) to planned camps, informal settlements, collective centres, and transit reception centres, and do not account for total camp or site IDP populations or IDPs within the host communities. The definition of IDPs used by enumerators for this assessment was ‘Individuals or groups of people who have been forced to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as a result of or in order to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalised violence, violations of human rights, or natural or man-made disasters, and who have not crossed an international border'. The definition of planned camp was 'A planned camp is a place where IPDs find accomodation on purpose-built sites, where service infrastructure is provided and distribution take place. The camp is established by an accountable humanitarian actor and to the extent possible, meet the minimum SPHERE standards'. The definition of informal settlements was 'Otherwise known as a self-settled camp or a spontaneous site, hosting 5 or more IDP households. IDPs may settle in a camp that is independent of assistance from the government or humanitarian community. They are a group of tented, or other types of housing units, or unfinished buildings established by IDPs themselves or by non-experienced actors, often erected on land that the occupants have no legal claim to. IDPs intend to stay in this location for an extended period of time. At the moment, most of the so-called IDP camps in Syria fall under this category. ' The definition of collective centres was 'A pre-existing building or other structure used to host 5 or more IDP households, e.g. public buildings, schools, mosques, private collective building' The definition of transit reception centres was 'Otherwise known as transit camps, they provide temporary accomodation for displaced persons pending transfer to a suitable, safe, longer term camp, or at the end of an operation as a staging point of return. Reception/transit centres are usually either intermediate or short-term installations. These sites are often established during extremely large displacements.' Information should be considered as reflective of the situation at the time of data collection, given the dynamic situation in the region. In addition, information should be considered as indicative, and not representative, of the situation.
  • 3900+ Downloads
    Updated 13 November 2019 | Dataset date: November 08, 2019-November 08, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every month
    DTM is tracking in/out movement of displaced people in 4 Provinces hit by IDAI cyclone.
  • 80+ Downloads
    Updated 11 November 2019 | Dataset date: May 05, 2019-July 10, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The dataset contains IDPs at site level.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: April 04, 2018-April 04, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    This dataset comprises of 644 facilities that were classified as not exposed to a flood or landslide hazard within the 21 Kutupalong Refugee Camps to assess which facilities would be optimal for further shelter upgrades and reinforcement. An index was created for prioritization and of these 644 sites, 224 were identified as having optimal indicators for further site visits. Corresponding maps for these 224 sites can be found on the REACH Resource Centre or ReliefWeb. It should be noted that ALL 644 facilities not exposed to a flood or landslide hazard should be explored as viable options for awareness raising to the local Camp/Majhee populations. For further information regarding the indicators used for the analysis please see the caveats section below.
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: January 01, 2018-January 01, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Tsore Refugee Camp, International Rescue Committee Ethiopia Program, Tsore Refugee Camp Water Supply Coverage January 2018.
  • 40+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: February 26, 2019-February 26, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    Adi Harush Refugee Camp Water Supply Scheme Layout & Water Resource Facilities, Refugee Blocks and Service Facilities-May 2018
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: August 17, 2016-September 19, 2016
    This dataset updates: Every three months
    This dataset provides the clean data from round VI of the Quarterly IDP Camp Profiling exercise in Iraq, conducted in August-September 2016. The exercise was conducted by REACH and the CCCM Cluster Iraq. Findings are based on a total of 4,097 household interviews, and provide statistically representative data about the humanitarian situation and needs of the population of 48 formal IDP camps across Iraq.
  • 400+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: December 30, 2014-January 18, 2015
    This dataset updates: Every six months
    This population count of Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan, provides information about the camp's current inhabitants, disaggregated by age, sex, block and district, date of arrival, area of origin and shelter type. The count was conducted by REACH in partnership with UNICEF, between December 2014 to January 2015, in order to provide up to date figures about the camp's inhabitants to influence the planning and delivery of assistance by humanitarian actors. The population count shows a total population of 78,086 Syrian refugees present in Za’atari. This is 7,954 less than the last population count of Za’atari camp, conducted in June 2014, which identified 86,040 people. You can explore this dataset further using the Za'atari Camp Population Count Interactive Dashboard. You can also download the [Summary of Key Findings from the Za'atari Camp Population Count, January 2015] (http://www.reachresourcecentre.info/system/files/resource-documents/reach_jor_report_zaatari_camp_population_count_february2015_1.pdf)
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 31 October 2019 | Dataset date: October 29, 2019-October 29, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    South Sudan flood locations as per end of October 2019