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  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 01, 2016-December 31, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The socio-economic desk score dataset includes the socio-economic scores of the households that have taken the 2020 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees (VASyR) assessment. The desk score is a Proxy Means Test (PMT) score, available for all population, that predicts the economic vulnerability of households. The dataset includes the desk scores of the case numbers since 2016. In Lebanon, the desk score is revised annually and used by Lebanon Crisis Response Plan (LCRP) cash actors for the identification and selection of beneficiaries for multi-purpose cash assistance.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: March 11, 2019-March 22, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Uganda currently hosts about 1.2 million refugees spread across twelve settlements in the country with at least 60% of the caseload settled in the West Nile region of the country and having South Sudanese origin. The rest of the refugees come from Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, DRC and other countries. Most of the refugees particularly from South Sudan are new arrivals. The influxes particularly from South Sudan, Burundi and DRC over the past 3 years currently renders Uganda the biggest host for refugees in Africa. In order to efficiently offer adequate aid to these refugees, more and more humanitarian organizations and international non-governmental organizations have decided to convert in-kind support to cash-based transfers. These transfers are provided to people with special needs, such as pregnant women and the elderly, or to refugees taking part in 'cash for work' programmes (e.g., constructing community rubbish pits, building access roads, working on farms or planting trees). A total of 254 households were identified basing on the following criteria (stratified random sampling); (i) Parents/primary care-givers of children with severe mental disabilities, (ii) Parents/primary care-givers of children with special education needs enrolled in school, (iii) Family head with disability who is the primary care-giver of an orphaned child, (iv) Single-heads of household who are care-givers for children with specific needs, (v) Elderly women/men (above 60 years) who are primary caregivers of children with specific needs, (vi) Care-giver of persons with serious medical conditions.
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: February 25, 2021-April 02, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Tajikistan between February, to April, 2021. Tajikistan hosts the largest number of refugees in Central Asia, predominantly from neighbouring Afghanistan. While some progress has been achieved in areas such as access to health and education for refugees, livelihoods and self-reliance, though, continue to pose a challenge. As the result of Covid-19, refugees faced a myriad of challenges, including the loss of daily incomes and livelihoods to cover basic needs such as rent, food and health care. For refugees in Tajikistan, who largely rely on daily work, the impact of Covid 19 has been devastating as it has led to widespread unemployment. As a response measure, UNHCR jointly with its NGO partner provided Covid-19 cash assistance to 414 refugee households over the course of six months (July-December 2020). The results from this survey suggest that cash assistance provided as an immediate measure to support vulnerable refugee households during the Covid-19 pandemic has had a positive impact on the lives of the respondents. Cash assistance predominantly has been spent to cover food, medicines and rent costs. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 15, 2021-February 18, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Kyrgyzstan between February, to April, 2021. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and its far lasting financial impacts, UNHCR Kyrgyzstan has rolled out an Emergency Cash Assistance Program to help refugees meet their basic needs and to mitigate harsh socio-economic impacts in the time of crisis and countrywide lockdowns. The CBI was rolled out in two rounds to all refugee and asylum seeker households to help meet their basic needs including food, rent, and access to essential supplies and services during Covid-19 restrictions. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
  • Updated 4 July 2021 | Dataset date: January 25, 2021-March 09, 2021
    This dataset updates: Never
    THE CBI PDM Household Survey was conducted in Kazakhstan between February, to April, 2021. UNHCR uses Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) as a mechanism to collect refugees' feedback on the quality, sufficiency, utilization and effectiveness of the assistance items they receive. The underlying principle behind the process is linked to accountability, as well as a commitment to improve the quality and relevance of support provided, and related services. UNHCR increasingly uses Cash-Based Interventions (CBIs) as a preferred modality for delivering assistance, offering greater dignity and choice to forcibly displaced and stateless persons in line with UNHCR's core protection mandate. In order to ensure that the cash assistance provided meets the intended programme objectives and that desired outcomes are achieved, UNHCR conducts regular post-distribution and outcome monitoring with a sample or all of refugee recipients.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: March 16, 2020-May 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The present PDM was conducted under time and resource constraints related to COVID-19 emergency. Due to the restrictions on public gathering and partial restrictions on movements, the survey findings could not have been triangulated with the FGDs or market assessment, which will be an integral part of all subsequent PDMs. The PDM household survey data collection took place over three days on 25 - 27 March 2020. ProGres V4 data of Kalobeyei persons of concern was used as a sampling frame, with a sample drawn using stratified random sampling based on random numbers generation. The original sample included over 400 households (adjusted for a non-response rate) aiming at a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of 5. However, the enumerators managed to conduct 457 interviews with respondents added through convenience sampling. Due to poor quality of some of the records, however, only 388 data entries were validated. This nevertheless allows us to remain within the same degree of precision in the inference, although affected by a bias linked to a non-probability sampling.
  • Updated 26 May 2021 | Dataset date: October 26, 2020-November 16, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    These data were produced from a household survey that was part of the post-distribtion monitoring exercise for a cash-based intervention (CBI) in Dzaleka Refugee Camp, Dowa district of Malawi. The CBI was intended to provide consumption support to extremely poor households who graduated from the livelihoods programme. A cohort graduates from the programme after 18 months of active participation. Participants are selected from extremely poor households who live below the poverty line and often times engaged in negative coping mechanisms to meet their basic needs. The consumption support is meant as a cushion for their basic needs as they continue participating in various livelihoods activities. Consumption support has a time frame of 12 months for each participating cohort. The target groups involve persons of concern (POCs) and host communities. After 12 months, it is assumed that participants have started generating enough income to cushion for their basic needs including further investments through diversification into additional livelihoods activities. Out of the 449 households that received the CBI, 264 were randomly sampled for this post-distrubtion monitoring exercise. The total population in Dzaleka camp is 48,557.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 28 February 2021 | Dataset date: July 23, 2018-September 03, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    Since the onset of the Syrian crisis, the humanitarian community has increasingly relied on cash-based assistance provided from donor contributions and implemented by aid partners under the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan to support the affected population. In November 2017, the World Food Programme (WFP) joined the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and non-governmental organisations (NGO) in the delivery of multi-purpose cash (MPC) to assist the most economically vulnerable Syrian refugee households to meet their basic needs. This study aims to measure the short-term (12 months or less) and long-term (more than 12 months) causal impact of the $173.50 and $175 MPC assistance provided by WFP and UNHCR respectively, over and above the $27 per person per month assistance, as well as the impact of discontinuation from MPC on the well-being of Syrian refugees. This report presents the causal impact on multiple dimensions of well-being, namely household expenditures, food security, housing, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), education, employment, health and decision-making. The key take-away messages from the study are: 1. The impact of MPC materialised across most dimensions of well-being in the long-term, indicating the importance of households' access to a longer duration of MPC. 2. The benefits of MPC fade for many indicators within 4 to 10 months after discontinuation, and households' well-being returned to pre-assistance levels for most indicators, and dropped slightly below the pre-assistance baseline for others. 3. The findings would suggest that there are benefits to instituting longer cash cycles and/or linking MPC to other services through a 'cash plus' approach to expand and extend the positive impact of cash on beneficiary households and ensure sustainable impact. A total of 11,457 households were visited and used in this analysis, which constitutes one of the largest samples among impact evaluations conducted in Lebanon to date.
  • 20+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: June 09, 2019-June 24, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    In successive waves over four decades, Rohingya refugees have been fleeing to Bangladesh from Rakhine State, Myanmar, where they have suffered systematic ongoing persecution. Since August 2017, an estimated 745,000 Rohingya refugees have arrived in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, increasing the total number of Rohingya refugees to more than 900,000. Most of the newly-arrived refugees have settled in hilly, formerly-forested areas that are vulnerable to landslides and flash-flooding in monsoon season and rely heavily on humanitarian assistance to cover their basic needs. As the crisis moves beyond the initial emergency phase, comprehensive information on the needs and vulnerabilities of affected populations is needed in order to inform the design and implementation of effective inter-sectoral programming. To this aim, a Joint Multi-Sector Needs Assessment (J-MSNA) was conducted across Rohingya refugee populations to support humanitarian planning and enhance operational and strategic decision-making. The J-MSNA was conducted in support of the mid-term review of the 2019 Joint Response Plan (JRP), with the specific objective of enabling the tracking of JRP 2019 indicators for monitoring and review purposes. A total of 876 households were surveyed across 33 refugee sites. This J-MSNA was funded by UNHCR and coordinated through the MSNA Technical Working Group of the Information Management and Assessment Working Group (IMAWG), led by the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) and comprised of: UNHCR, IOM Needs and Population Monitoring (NPM), ACAPS, WFP VAM, Translators without Borders, and REACH.
  • 10+ Downloads
    Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: May 14, 2018-May 20, 2018
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Rohingya refugee population living in settlements in Cox’s Bazar is dependent on international assistance. Presently, there are limits on how self-sufficient refugees can be, as they have restricted freedom of movement beyond the areas where the settlements are and also have no right to work. In addition, there is insufficient land within their settlements to support subsistence farming. As a result, many refugees are unable to access cash independently to support themselves, and many struggle for the basic necessities not already covered by humanitarian assistance. All current assistance in the form of in-kind distributions and services are free of charge. This includes, for example, food, shelter materials, household items and health services. A number of cash-for-work schemes were designed to support and manage some of the basic services and works in the camps; however, to date, they have not created sufficient income opportunities for refugees or host communities. Likewise, our teams have confirmed that some humanitarian aid items are being sold at local markets. This shows refugees are adopting other, and potentially harmful, coping mechanisms to generate cash for their needs that are not, or not fully, covered by current humanitarian assistance. Negative coping strategies such as food borrowing, reduction in the number of meals and reduced consumption of preferred foods are witnessed across the entire Rohingya refugee population. Between April and May 2018, UNHCR piloted the delivery of unconditional and unrestricted Multipurpose Cash Grants (MPGs) to cover unmet basic needs. This extended to all residents of Camp 5 and Camp 6 in the Kutupalong refugee settlement and was equivalent to approximately half of the monthly Minimum Expenditure Basket (MEB) for a family of five. After completing the delivery of the grants, UNHCR conducted a detailed Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) survey (320 households were interviewed). A Post-Distribution Monitoring (PDM) survey is a mechanism to collect and understand refugees’ feedback on the assistance provided by humanitarian agencies like UNHCR. PDMs are widely used by UNHCR and help to evaluate the effectiveness of the assistance provided directly by UNHCR or through its partners. A PDM is conducted independently from the distribution exercise itself, but closely following it in time. This PDM was intended to evaluate the adequacy of the cash grant provided as well as patterns in its use. It also sought to identify challenges and constraints experienced, and seek refugees’ feedback on any improvements required to implement similar assistance again in the future. The PDM supports a hypothesis that the current basic in-kind assistance packages provided to refugees are not sufficient to meet all demonstrated needs, with the result that potentially harmful coping mechanisms like selling assistance are employed. The adoption of this cash programme by UNHCR, therefore, seeks to ensure that refugees can address their multiple needs in accordance with their household and personal priorities, including benefits such as greater access to a more diversified diet, better hygiene or shelter improvements.
  • Updated 7 February 2021 | Dataset date: March 16, 2020-May 23, 2020
    This dataset updates: Never
    The present PDM was conducted under time and resource constraints related to COVID-19 emergency. Due to the restrictions on public gathering and partial restrictions on movements, the survey findings could not have been triangulated with the FGDs or market assessment, which will be an integral part of all subsequent PDMs. The PDM household survey data collection took place over three days on 25 - 27 March 2020. ProGres V4 data of Kalobeyei persons of concern was used as a sampling frame, with a sample drawn using stratified random sampling based on random numbers generation. The original sample included over 400 households (adjusted for a non-response rate) aiming at a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of 5. However, the enumerators managed to conduct 457 interviews with respondents added through convenience sampling. Due to poor quality of some of the records, however, only 388 data entries were validated. This nevertheless allows us to remain within the same degree of precision in the inference, although affected by a bias linked to a non-probability sampling.
  • 6600+ Downloads
    Updated 27 January 2021 | Dataset date: September 01, 2015-September 01, 2015
    This dataset updates: Never
    This datasets contains a collection of pre-disaster indicators for the Philippines.
  • 7000+ Downloads
    Updated 6 April 2020 | Dataset date: August 20, 2018-August 20, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    Market Monitoring monthly dataset with Survival Minimum Expenditure Basket (SMEB) prices. To inform humanitarian actors’ cash and voucher programming, REACH and the Cash-Based Responses Technical Working Group (CBR–TWG) conduct monthly monitoring of key markets throughout Syria to assess the availability and affordability of basic commodities (Market Monitoring Exercise).
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 6 January 2020 | Dataset date: December 25, 2019-December 27, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Findings presented in this data set are based on data collected by REACH as part of a rapid camps and sites assessment to provide insight on: How many new IDP arrivals are arriving to camps, informal settlements, collective centres, or transit reception centres reported at the site level since Dec. 18th Movement intentions of the new IDP arrivals in the coming two weeks Identify priority needed items by sector of the new IDP arrivals. Data was collected in 150 communities across eight sub-districts in Northern Idleb and Western Aleppo from 25 to 27 December 2019 through REACH enumerators who surveyed one Key Informant (KI) per community on internally displaced persons' (IDPs) camps and sites nearest to their community. In order to qualify as camp or site, a site had to have 5 or more IDP households living on its premises. 1,253 camps and sites were assessed across 150 communities. IDP numbers solely represent newly arrived IDPs (5 or more HH) to planned camps, informal settlements, collective centres, and transit reception centres, and do not account for total camp or site IDP populations or IDPs within the host communities. The definition of IDPs used by enumerators for this assessment was ‘Individuals or groups of people who have been forced to leave their homes or places of habitual residence, in particular as a result of or in order to avoid the effects of armed conflict, situations of generalised violence, violations of human rights, or natural or man-made disasters, and who have not crossed an international border'. The definition of planned camp was 'A planned camp is a place where IPDs find accomodation on purpose-built sites, where service infrastructure is provided and distribution take place. The camp is established by an accountable humanitarian actor and to the extent possible, meet the minimum SPHERE standards'. The definition of informal settlements was 'Otherwise known as a self-settled camp or a spontaneous site, hosting 5 or more IDP households. IDPs may settle in a camp that is independent of assistance from the government or humanitarian community. They are a group of tented, or other types of housing units, or unfinished buildings established by IDPs themselves or by non-experienced actors, often erected on land that the occupants have no legal claim to. IDPs intend to stay in this location for an extended period of time. At the moment, most of the so-called IDP camps in Syria fall under this category. ' The definition of collective centres was 'A pre-existing building or other structure used to host 5 or more IDP households, e.g. public buildings, schools, mosques, private collective building' The definition of transit reception centres was 'Otherwise known as transit camps, they provide temporary accomodation for displaced persons pending transfer to a suitable, safe, longer term camp, or at the end of an operation as a staging point of return. Reception/transit centres are usually either intermediate or short-term installations. These sites are often established during extremely large displacements.' Information should be considered as reflective of the situation at the time of data collection, given the dynamic situation in the region. In addition, information should be considered as indicative, and not representative, of the situation.
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 27 December 2019 | Dataset date: November 30, 2019-November 30, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    The data covers all registered Pantawid IP beneficiaries regardless of their program status. The Modified Conditional Cash Transfer Program (MCCT) is a sub-component of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program which is uses modified approach in implementing the CCT program for poor families including homeless, Indigenous People and Families in Need of Special Protection (FNSP).
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: May 13, 2018-May 13, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    To inform humanitarian actors’ cash and voucher programming, REACH and the Cash-Based Responses Technical Working Group (CBR–TWG) conduct monthly monitoring of key markets throughout Syria to assess the availability and affordability of basic commodities (Market Monitoring Exercise).
  • 300+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: April 10, 2018-April 10, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    To inform humanitarian actors’ cash and voucher programming, REACH and the Cash-Based Responses Technical Working Group (CBR–TWG) conduct monthly monitoring of key markets throughout Syria to assess the availability and affordability of basic commodities (Market Monitoring Exercise).
  • 900+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: December 16, 2014-December 16, 2014
    This dataset updates: Never
    This data is the list containing the location of FSPs consolidated by the Cash Working Group for Typhoon Haiyan Response in the Philippines 2014
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 10 November 2019 | Dataset date: July 10, 2018-July 10, 2018
    This dataset updates: Every month
    To inform humanitarian actors’ cash and voucher programming, REACH and the Cash-Based Responses Technical Working Group (CBR–TWG) conduct monthly monitoring of key markets throughout Syria to assess the availability and affordability of basic commodities (Market Monitoring Exercise).
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 16 August 2019 | Dataset date: August 16, 2019-August 16, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Myanmar 2018 Cash Transfer Programming Activities 4W
  • 200+ Downloads
    Updated 2 May 2019 | Dataset date: July 31, 2018-December 31, 2019
    This dataset updates: As needed
    Cameroon Who is doing What, Where, for Whom and When for Cash and Vouchers Assistance projects
  • 100+ Downloads
    Updated 2 May 2019 | Dataset date: April 25, 2019-April 25, 2019
    This dataset updates: Never
    The Program for Persons with Severe Disability targets adults and children with severe disabilities who require full time support of a care giver. Total allocation for persons with severe disability is expected to increase by 9.3 per cent from KSh 1.2 billion in 2017/18 to KSh 1.3 billion in 2018/19
  • 3400+ Downloads
    Updated 18 February 2019 | Dataset date: February 18, 2019-February 18, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every day
    FTS publishes data on humanitarian funding flows as reported by donors and recipient organizations. It presents all humanitarian funding to a country and funding that is specifically reported or that can be specifically mapped against funding requirements stated in humanitarian response plans. The data comes from OCHA's Financial Tracking Service, is encoded as utf-8 and the second row of the CSV contains HXL tags.
  • 5200+ Downloads
    Updated 29 January 2019 | Dataset date: January 29, 2019-January 29, 2019
    This dataset updates: Every day
    FTS publishes data on humanitarian funding flows as reported by donors and recipient organizations. It presents all humanitarian funding to a country and funding that is specifically reported or that can be specifically mapped against funding requirements stated in humanitarian response plans. The data comes from OCHA's Financial Tracking Service, is encoded as utf-8 and the second row of the CSV contains HXL tags.
  • 500+ Downloads
    Updated 16 August 2018 | Dataset date: December 31, 2013-December 31, 2013
    This dataset updates: Every year
    Regional (4-B, 6, 7, 8) Households under the 4P This data provides information on the households under the 4P (Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program) - a conditional cash transfer scheme run by the government of the Philippines. All personally information on individuals has been removed. Data has been aggregated at the household level. For each household in the database, the geographic information is provided as is data on the approximate income of the the household, whether they are identified as "poor" and whether or not they are receiving 4P assistance. Data for Region 4-B, 6, 7 is from 1 Jan 2014, Data for Region 8 is from 1 Aug 2013